Tag Archives: City of Fulton

Fulton Bike Rodeo returns May 31

By Ashley M. Casey

The annual Fulton Bike Rodeo, sponsored by the Fulton Police Department, will be held 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 31 at the Fulton Community Center.

The long-running event, which is geared toward children, features a bicycle obstacle course, bounce house and a bicycle giveaway for kids in need.

The city of Fulton is donating abandoned bikes to be sold as scrap metal to benefit the Bike Rodeo. Oswego Health, Dunkin Donuts and the Child Advocacy Center of Oswego County are also sponsors. Continue reading

Fulton mayor says Aldi project still a go

By Ashley M. Casey

Mayor Ron Woodward dispelled rumors that Aldi’s plan to develop the former Nestlé property on Fourth and Fay streets had fallen through at the May 6 meeting of the Fulton Common Council. Demolition activity at the site has ceased to allow for asbestos abatement in the buildings.

Ralph Stacy Jr. of the city’s planning commission addressed the mayor and the council during the public forum, saying that several people had approached him after hearing that Aldi’s proposal was “in jeopardy.”

“People have noticed that the demo activity has halted at the plant and people are concerned and they want to know what’s going on,” Stacy said. Continue reading

Fulton ups fines for rental violations

By Ashley M. Casey

Fulton landlords will have to be a little more diligent in caring for their properties.

The Fulton Common Council amended the law concerning housing maintenance and rental permits to include steeper fines for property owners who skip out on inspections and a $500 fee to renew a revoked rental permit.

“It adds fees to multiple inspections and ‘no-shows’ to help offset our costs and entice owners to come into compliance in a more timely manner,” Brace Tallents of the code enforcement office told The Valley News. “We think that the $500 per unit fee will provide some incentive to the owners to pay a little more attention to their properties.”

The law amends the City Charter’s Subsection C 152(J), “Housing maintenance; rental permits.” The fee for a rental permit is $30 per unit, which includes one code inspection and one follow-up re-inspection to correct any code violations.

That fee doubles to $60 for a second re-inspection, and increases by $30 for each subsequent re-inspection, up to $180 for a sixth re-inspection. If a unit is occupied, the cutoff is the third re-inspection and the code enforcement officer files charges against the property owner.

There are also cancellation and “no-show” fees: $25 if the owner fails to appear within 15 minutes of a scheduled inspection, $25 if the owner cancels within 24 hours of the inspection and $35 for a second cancellation.

“This is not going to hurt landlords that take care of their properties,” Fourth Ward Councilor Jim Myers said. “This is basically recouping our costs for landlords that don’t fix up their properties in a timely manner.”

Fulton resident Dennis Merlino asked the council about “checks and balances” in terms of this amendment’s financial incentive to the city.

“What mechanisms does the city have in place to prevent this from being abused?” Merlino asked.

Mayor Ron Woodward Sr. said the fees mainly act as a deterrent to delinquent landlords and the city spends a lot of time in court battling with such property owners.

“We’re not going to waste our time … on people who don’t want to do simple housing maintenance,” Woodward said.

Tallents said property owners usually have 30 days to correct code violations. Woodward said landlords who are making improvements or need more time to correct violations can apply for an administrative hearing through the code enforcement office without incurring extra penalties.

 

2 Fulton grocers oppose plan for new Aldi store

By Ashley M. Casey

Despite the dissent of two local grocers, the city of Fulton is going forward with Aldi’s plan to build a 17,651-square-foot grocery store on the former Nestlé site.

If all goes as planned, the Nestlé buildings will be demolished by the end of June and construction of the Aldi store will begin in July with an anticipated opening in December. Continue reading

Boil-water advisory: Fulton water has high turbidity levels

by Andrew Henderson

The City of Fulton issued a boil-water advisory over the weekend after a breakdown at the K-1 well.

Discolored water entered the Fulton water system Saturday, causing turbidity, or cloudiness. The city tests for turbidity in order to see if it is effectively filtering the water supply.

Because the west side is connected to the east side via two bridge pipelines, the boil water advisory also applied to that side of the river.

There was an undermining problem at the K-1 well and it was taken immediately off line after it was reported by an on-site Water Works resident.

As customer complaints came in, hydrants were opened at those locations and remained so until the water had cleared. Chlorine levels have been elevated at the Fulton Water Works as an added precautionary measure of safety.

Because of these high levels of turbidity, there is an increased chance that the water may contain disease-causing organisms.

In an effort to combat against this possibility, chlorine levels have been turned up at the Fulton Water Works. This boil water advisory will remain in effect until at least today, May 23 when all regulatory sampling results should be received.

The city is encouraging residents not to drink the water without boiling it first. Residents should bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using.

Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and food preparation until further notice.

Turbidity has no health effects. However, turbidity can interfere with disinfection and provide a medium for microbial growth. Turbidity may indicate the presence of disease causing organisms.

These organisms may include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause symptoms such as nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
People with severely compromised immune systems, infants, and some elderly may be at increased risk. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.

Fulton Area Home Show to be held March 31

Booths and exhibits from building suppliers, home repair specialists, and financial institutions will fill the Fulton War Memorial for the sixth consecutive year when the Fulton Area Home Show returns Saturday, March 31.

The free home show is an opportunity for local homeowners and potential homebuyers to get a glimpse of the  many services available for buying, selling, renovating, and sprucing up a home.

The show runs from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. and features a special guest this year. Carol Bradford will be on hand from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. to talk about gardening, pruning and other landscaping Ideas.

Continue reading