Tag Archives: Assemblyman Will Barclay

Four county libraries receive special state grants

 

by Andrew Henderson

The libraries in Phoenix, Parish, Pulaski and Williamstown are recipients of grants from the State of New York, according to Senator Patty Ritchie.

Ritchie said she secured special funding for 25 area libraries and two library networks serving local communities.  The libraries — 15 in Jefferson County, six in St. Lawrence and four in Oswego — will share $85,000 in special funding that’s in addition to a $4 million increase in state budget aid for libraries statewide.

“Today’s libraries are more than just places to find a great book,” the senator said. “They are community centers that serve as excellent resources for researchers, job-seekers and families living on a budget.”

The Phoenix library is getting over $12,500 to repair its roof and enact energy-saving measures, according to Assemblyman Will Barclay.

“Our libraries provide access to vital information for the public, as well as host programs offering culturally enriching opportunities,” said Barclay. “These construction grants will greatly assist in providing the crucial infrastructure repairs our libraries need to continue serving our communities.”

More than 40 percent of library buildings across New York are over 60 years old and another 30 percent are more than three decades old. Many of the state’s libraries are unable to accommodate users with disabilities, are energy inefficient, cannot provide Internet and computer and other electronic technologies to users because of outdated and inadequate electrical wiring and do not have sufficient space to house the library’s expanding collection.

Ritchie serves on the recently re-formed State Senate Select Committee on Libraries. The Senate’s former leadership eliminated the library panel. Ritchie was appointed a member of the panel in 2012.

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WarOnSynthetics1

State legislation aimed at improving synthetic drugs laws

Pictured is the Woolson family of Baldwinsville standing at a press conference held Tuesday in Oswego. They lost a loved one due to injuries related to synthetic drug use and support legislation that would close legal loopholes regarding synthetics.
Pictured is the Woolson family of Baldwinsville standing at a press conference held Tuesday in Oswego. They lost a loved one due to injuries related to synthetic drug use and support legislation that would close legal loopholes regarding synthetics.

by Nicole Reitz

A press conference was held Tuesday outside of the Oswego County Public Safety Building to discuss proposed legislation aimed at improving laws related to synthetic drugs.

Assemblyman Will Barclay spoke of a new comprehensive legislation that would increase penalties, penalize chemical swapping, mislabeling and other proposed charges.

Barlcay and Senator Patty Ritchie’s bill would also penalize both dealers and users of synthetics.

The legislation defines a synthetic drug as any substance that affects a person’s cannabinoid receptor.

The cannabinoid receptors language in the legislation pinpoints the affect the drug has on a person, rather than naming actual substances.

Oswego County Sheriff Reuel Todd said that while the use of synthetics has definitely decreased in Oswego County, these drugs are typically sold as other products, such as bath salts, shoe powder and incense.

“You still have a certain amount of people that want to make a buck and not have to work for it, and they prey on the vulnerable,” said Todd. “Having this law in place would allow us to act faster when a new drug comes on the scene and better protect the public.”

Police approaching a scene put themselves in danger because of the users’ erratic behaviors. Users can hallucinate, become extremely agitated, paranoid and violent — sometimes for days.

Todd said that those under the influence of synthetics also have a “terrific ability to mask pain,” and can withstand taser guns and pepper spray.

The reaction of the people taking these poisons also make the jobs of health-care professionals more difficult. Unlike more common street drugs, nurses and doctors do not know the chemical makeup of these drugs, making it hard to treat users symptoms.

Often the abusers of these agents do not realize or anticipate the intensity of symptoms that are produced from these drugs.

One of these people is the late Victor Woolson of Baldwinsville, who died last August of injuries sustained from a synthetic drug called Avalanche.

Woolson purchased it in Oswego on a store shelve, which he falsely believed to be a legal and safe alternative to real drugs.

The Woolson family was at the press conference, holding signs in remembrance of Victor.

The family advocates for strengthening laws regarding synthetics to prevent further addiction and deaths. Victor died after federal legislation and the New York Department of Health ban was put in place.

Teresa Woolson, Victor’s mother, knows that improving the law will help the problem of synthetic drug use in the county.

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Dr. Uva receives Distinguished Service Award

Several colleagues attended the honoring of Dr. Uva. From left are Oswego Health Medical Staff President Dr. Ivan Proano, President and CEO of Oswego Health Ann Gilpin, Dr. Ronald Uva, Assemblyman Will Barclay and Chair of Oswego Health Board of Directors Thomas Schneider.
Several colleagues attended the honoring of Dr. Uva. From left are Oswego Health Medical Staff President Dr. Ivan Proano, President and CEO of Oswego Health Ann Gilpin, Dr. Ronald Uva, Assemblyman Will Barclay and Chair of Oswego Health Board of Directors Thomas Schneider.

by Nicole Reitz

Dr. Ronald Uva, who has been on Oswego Hospital’s active medical staff for more than 30 years, recently received the Distinguished Service Award from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Assemblyman Will Barclay presented Dr. Uva with an Assembly Resolution Friday at Oswego Health. The resolution was presented to Dr. Uva in the company of his close colleagues, hospital administrators, his wife Sarah and their children and grandchildren.

During his years at the hospital, Dr. Uva has taken an active role in his profession and has served on several state medical boards. He earned his undergraduate degree from the University of Buffalo and attended medical school at the University of Studies of Bologna, in Bologna, Italy. His residency was completed at Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse.

He is the former medical coordinator for the Oswego-Montserrat connection for Partners of the Americas. In this capacity, he taught medical professionals how to incorporate ultrasound and fetal monitoring into obstetrical practices.

Dr. Uva is the current president of Oswego County OB/GYN, PC, which has provided obstetrical and gynecological care to the residents of Oswego County for more than 45 years. The group also provides 24 hour on-site coverage at the Oswego Hospital Maternity Center.

Dr. Uva was elected as vice chair of the New York District of American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in 2011.

In this position, he advocates at both the state and federal levels for universal maternity coverage and for other health issues related to women.

He recently began his second five-year term on the NYS Board for Medicine. He is believed to be the first physician from Oswego Health to be named to the prestigious state board.

He has also been active with the Medical Society of the State of New York and writes semiannual book reviews for the organization.

Closer to home, Dr. Uva writes a monthly column for the Palladium-Times titled, and in 1997 was named Little League Coach of the Year.

Barclay commended Uva on his several accomplishment, and his sustained commitment to excellence.

“Dr. Uva has brought many Oswego County residents into this world,” said Barclay. “Beyond his admirable accomplishments with his many patients, he also works to improve the medical community through his advocacy efforts.

“You know how dedicated a person really is and one that believes in their community when I walk into a room to honor him and the first thing he talks about is some issues that need to be addressed,” added Barclay.

Oswego Health President and CEO Ann Gilpin said that its Dr. Uva’s work outside of his practice and busy family life that makes him such an asset to the hospital and the community.

To read the rest of the article, pick up a copy of The Valley News. You can subscribe by calling 598-6397 or click on the link on our home page. 

Barclay calls Hollywood gun amendment a ‘joke’

by Andrew Henderson

Governor Andrew Cuomo made the first amendment to the controversial NY SAFE Act last week. It was an amendment that Assemblyman Will Barclay called a “joke.”

The governor’s first amendment to the controversial gun-control legislation allows Hollywood productions to continue using the weapons banned by the legislation.

Barclay has expressed concern that the first amendment to this ill-conceived measure failed to address the restrictions banning law enforcement officers from entering school property as well as the legitimate concerns of law-abiding sportsmen and gun owners.

“(Last week), we saw nearly 10,000 law-abiding sportsmen, law enforcement officers and law-abiding gun owners rally together for their right to bear arms,” Barclay said about Thursday’s rally in Albany. “Rather than address their concerns and the many flaws in the NY SAFE Act, the governor has decided that the needs of Hollywood producers supersedes the needs of our residents and law enforcement officers.

“It’s more evident with each passing day that the NY SAFE Act needs to be repealed,” Barclay added. “I urge the governor to take action and eliminate this measure that does little to address the root causes of violence and illegal firearm use, while infringing on the constitutional right of all responsible New Yorkers.”

Recently, members of the Oswego County Legislature approved a resolution urging the state to repeal its recently adopted NY Safe Act.

Oswego County was one of 50 counties to have proposed or passed resolutions seeking its repeal.

The new law requires criminal background checks on the sale of ammunition, requires five-year renewals on pistol permits, and changes mental health reporting requirements.

Those mandates will be costly to the county, the legislators claim in their memorializing resolution. The legislation outlines a stricter definition of assault weapons and implements an immediate ban of defined assault weapons.

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Governor’s budget includes more aid to school districts

by Andrew Henderson

Governor Andrew Cuomo presented his executive budget earlier this week.

Local representatives were cautiously optimistic about the governor’s plan, which does not include new taxes or fees, closes a $1.35 billion budget gap, and increases aid to local school districts.

“Taking a first look at Governor Cuomo’s 2013-2014 New York State budget, I found things to like but also things that concern me,” said Assemblyman Bob Oaks. “I am encouraged the governor was able to keep the ‘all funds’ budget increase under the two-percent spending cap and has proposed a four percent increase in education aide.

“I think the legislature should take a serious look at considering his mandate relief initiatives,” Oaks added. “At the same time, we need to determine exactly how he proposes to portion out that school aid and encourage him to consider additional mandate relief.”

According to the governor’s budget, the Fulton City School District is targeted to receive $37,074,440 in state aid, an increase of 3.11 percent.

The Hannibal Central School District is targeted to receive $16,646,549 in state aid, which is an increase of 2.26 percent.

The Oswego City School District is looking at $15,732,350, which is an increase of .53 percent while the Phoenix Central School District is targeted to receive $19,559,842, which is an increase of 1.20 percent.

Assemblyman Will Barclay said he was pleased that the budget proposal does not include more taxes or fees.

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