Category Archives: Other News

George Horace Stone, Jr.

Stone OBGeorge H. Stone, Jr., 74, of Fulton, passed away on Saturday, Feb. 7, at Upstate University Hospital after an extended illness. He was born on May 20, 1940 in Boylston, a son to the late George and Nellie Dennie Stone, Sr. George retired from Huhtamaki after 45 years. He was a hardworking, independent, do it yourself individual who was a loving and devoted family man. Along with his parents he was predeceased by three siblings, Francis Stone, Bill Stone and Myrtle Smith and granddaughter, Stella Stone.

George will be greatly missed and forever loved by his wife of 37 years, Dawn Stone; five children, Virginia (Kevin Leonard) Stone of Auburn, Patricia (Randy) Platt of Oswego, Steven (Andrea) Stone of Phoenix, Timothy (Trisha) Stone of Hannibal and Tammie (Charles) Carroll of Fulton; 13 grandchildren, Tonia, Saun, Andy, Danny, Jamie, Zoey, Sam, Ceceila, Kyle, Hailey, Bryce, Ryan and Mya; eight great-grandchildren; beloved dog, Roxi as well as several nieces and nephews.

A funeral service was held Thursday at Foster Funeral Home, Fulton. Spring burial will be in St. Peter’s Cemetery, Oswego.

 

Paul H. Hicks

Hicks OBPaul H. Hicks, 64, of Sterling, passed away on Monday, Feb. 9, at home surrounded by his family. He was born in Fulton, a son to the late William Hicks and Ida Stevens and lived all his life in Sterling. Paul graduated from Red Creek Central High School in 1969 and was a boilermaker with the Boilermakers Local #175, Oswego for 30 years, retiring in 2006.

He is survived by his wife of 35 years, Kathleen Hicks; three children, Renee (Steve) Griffin of Sterling, Erin (Michael) Schane of Lake Ariel, Pa., and Paul (Jamie) Hicks, Jr. of Red Creek; three sisters, Lucy Arseneau of Webster, Mary (Steve) Zonneville of Williamson and Susan Wollek of Rochester; six brothers, Joe Hicks of Sterling, Michael Hicks of Martville, Patrick Hicks of Hannibal, Tom (Dawn) Hicks of Chaumont Bay, N.Y., Mark (Becky) Hicks of Sterling and Dan Hicks of Sterling; eight grandchildren, Kate, Beau, Margaret, Emma, Brett, Hunter, Ryan and Hayden as well as several nieces and nephews.

Calling hours were Friday at Foster Funeral Home, 837 Cayuga St., Hannibal, 13074.

 

Carol Louise Cole

Carol Louise Cole, 95, of Granby, (Fulton), passed away at home on Tuesday Feb. 10, 2015. Born in Phoenix, N.Y., to her late parents, Leal M. (Henley) and George A. Archambo on December 25, 1919, she was a graduate of Phoenix High School and continued her education in the field of cosmetology.

Cole OBCarol was a licensed beautician, and self-employed owner of Carol’s Beauty Shop. She was a lady of faith, belonging to Fulton Alliance Church. Carol served as a deaconess, a Sunday school teacher, Bible study group member and participated in the Vacation Bible School program, summers.

She was predeceased by her husband of 60 years, Daniel  C. Cole, Jr. on March 16, 2011; her granddaughter, Cynthia “Cindy” Thompson, died December 4, 2013.

Surviving are her daughter, Sandra Louise Sivers of Fulton; a grandson, William (Ronica) Sivers; Cindy’s husband David Thompson; four great-grandchildren, Will (Kristina) Sivers, Kyle Stapleton, Melinda Stapleton, and Cody Sivers; a sister Frances Currier; a brother-in-law, Leo Borte; several nieces, nephews.

Memorial services will be on Saturday Feb. 21, 2015 at 11 a.m. in the Fulton Alliance Church, 1044 state Route 48, Fulton, NY 13069, with the Rev. J. Spurling officiating.

Per Carol’s wishes, there will be no calling hours.

Spring burial will be in Jacksonville Cemetery, 9250 Fenner Rd., town of Lysander, N.Y.

Contributions in Carol’s memory should be made to Fulton Alliance Church.

 

Margaret A. Lambert

Lambert OBMargaret A. Lambert, 90, of Granby, passed away Monday, Feb. 9, at Loretto. She was born in Split Rock, N. Y., a daughter to the late James and Margaret McNally, and lived most of her life in Granby. Margaret was a devoted mother and homemaker. In addition to her parents, she was predeceased by her husband, Robert W. Lambert; sons, Robert B. Lambert and Patric L. Lambert and by a son-in-law, Peter Loughlin. Margaret is survived by her children, Diane Loughlin, Cliff (Darlene) Lambert, Gloria Lambert and Paul (Kelly) Lambert; she is also survived by several grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. Margaret’s family would like to extend a sincere thank you to their mother’s special caregiver and friend, Steve Prince. Funeral services are private. Burial will be in the spring at Fairdale Rural Cemetery, Hannibal. Foster Funeral Home, has care of arrangements.

 

Improvements planned for Recreation Park

By Colin Hogan

Fulton's Recreation Park, which sits next to G. Ray Bodley High School along the eastern side of Lake Neatahwanta, will get a makeover this summer thanks to state funds recently acquired through state Sen. Patricia Ritchie. File photo
Fulton’s Recreation Park, which sits next to G. Ray Bodley High School along the eastern side of Lake Neatahwanta, will get a makeover this summer thanks to state funds recently acquired through state Sen. Patricia Ritchie.
File photo

Wheels are in motion for Fulton to upgrade Recreation Park this summer with a new kayak launch and playground.

The project comes thanks to $50,000 in state funds acquired through state Sen. Patricia Ritchie (R-Oswegatchie). Officials said those funds, coupled with a discount on playground equipment arranged through KaBOOM! — a national nonprofit that specializes in establishing parks in high-need communities — should cover the full cost of the endeavor.

Fulton Parks and Recreation Superintendent Barry Ostrander said restoring the 28-acre park, which sits next to G. Ray Bodley High School along the eastern side of Lake Neatahwanta, is one of many steps on the path to revitalizing the lake-area’s recreational use.

“We’d like to eventually restore that whole area, including the Stevenson Beach area, back to how it was years ago before all of the issues with the lake,” Ostrander said.

Lake Neatahwanta has sat mostly dormant for years due to a high concentration blue-green algae. Clean-up efforts are currently underway by committees in both Fulton and Granby, which include dredging silt from the lake’s basin.

Ritchie, who also acquired major funding for the lake clean-up efforts, stated in a press release Wednesday that she was pleased to be able to help with the park project.

“Whether they are for families or individuals, quality outdoor recreational opportunities are key to any strong community,” said Ritchie. “I’m pleased to provide this funding, which will give children a safe place to play and also build upon efforts to revitalize Lake Neatahwanta.”

Ostrander said Ritchie “has been instrumental” in helping Fulton move forward with its lake-area projects.

“I can’t thank Sen. Ritchie enough, because with out her help these things would’t be possible. We’re very fortunate to have her assistance,” he said.

The park’s roots can be traced back to the early 1920s when leaders at the American Woolen Mills factory decided to establish recreational facilities for their 1,500 employees. Fulton then adopted the site a city park in 1961.

Kelley Weaver of Friends of Fulton Parks said her organization will be seeking input from students at both G. Ray Bodley and Fulton Junior High School on what kinds of playground equipment they’d prefer to have on the site, as they will likely be using it most often.

“There’s no playground equipment there geared toward the 13-and-older age group, so we want their input on what we can put there that will be most useful to them,” Weaver said.

The kids’ input on the equipment will be key to ensuring that the park doesn’t go unused, according to Ostrander.

“That’s what you need. You have to get what the kids want to use, otherwise it’s just going to sit there,” Ostrander said.

Weaver said improvements like these are exactly what Friends of Fulton Parks aims to accomplish, and thanked the senator for her support.

“Here in Fulton, we are continually striving to make our community a better place for those who live here,” said Weaver. “A big part of that is making sure there are family-friendly opportunities for people to get outside and get active. Our organization’s main goal is to increase the well-being of others by improving our local parks. We are truly grateful that Sen. Ritchie recognizes how important parks are to enhancing local communities and we are thankful for her support.”

The kayak launch, which will be handicap-accessible, will be the only one of its kind on the lake. Ostrander said once the next round of lake clean-up begins this spring, he will have a better idea of where they can place the launch, provided it doesn’t interfere with any of the dredging efforts.

While the state funds should cover the entire cost of the project, Fulton will have to pay up front and be reimbursed by the state after the work is complete. The Common Council authorized city clerk/chamberlain Dan O’Brien Tuesday to establish a $50,000 capital account for the project.

Second Ward Councilor Daniel Knopp said improving Recreation Park could also be a boon to the Fulton’s lake clean-up fundraising.

“Anything we do to improve the area along the lake is just going to draw more attention to the lake, and hopefully bring more funds to the clean-up project,” Knopp said.

Knopp also gave special thanks to Ritchie “for the interest she’s had in the city of Fulton and helping us with this project.”

 

Council to consider raising parking fines

By Colin Hogan

Next month, the Fulton Common Council will be considering raising the city’s parking fines, which officials say are outdated and not compliant with state mandates.

The council will hold a public hearing on proposed changes to the parking ticket structure, which would alter both the initial fines for violations and how unpaid fines increase over time.

The city’s current structure applies $15 and $25 for basic parking tickets, and $50 for a handicapped parking violation.

From there, unpaid fines on basic tickets increase every 10 days to a maximum of $65 on an initial $15 ticket, or up to $75 on a $25 ticket.

The recommendation for the new structure comes from Fulton Police Chief Orlo A. Green III, who said it’s been more than two decades since the fines have been updated.

“I’ve been here 21 years and it hasn’t been changed since before I was chief,” Green said.

Green proposes raising all basic parking fines to $30, which would then double after 30 days, rather than accrue gradually 10 days at a time. He says that would make the violations easier to track and enforce.

Green said there is also a state-mandated $30 surcharge that is supposed to be imposed on all handicapped parking violations. He said Fulton has never been compliant with this mandate, and proposes raising those fines to $80 to include the state’s surcharge.

“We wouldn’t be getting any more money from that, but the state would get its charge,” Green said.

Mayor Ron Woodward Sr. said Fulton is the only municipality in the area that isn’t compliant with that mandate, and said he believes a portion of those funds go to local agencies that assist people with disabilities.

“The handicapped (parking) fines are something we really need to do something about,” Woodward said.

Green said, because the city currently has to order new tickets from its supplier, the time is right to make the change.

The proposal also includes changes to city’s law regarding unregistered vehicles. Currently, the law only allows for tickets to be issued on vehicles that are being “operated” without a valid registration. Green is proposing an addition to the law that would include prohibiting unregistered vehicles from being parked on any city streets, as well.

The public hearing will be held at the beginning of the March 3 Common Council meeting at 7 p.m.

 

Fire destroys structure in Volney

A fire burned down a backyard structure in the town of Volney Wednesday. First responders were called to 65 Distin Road just after 2 p.m., where a fire was burning through a 20-by-30-foot shed that was reportedly used to house chickens. Officials with the Volney Volunteer Fire Corporation said the building appeared to have been mostly burned down by the time a call was placed to authorities. Firefighters remained on the scene until 3:23 p.m., the Oswego County E911 Center reported. No people were injured, but several chickens were reportedly lost in the fire. Fire departments from Volney, Cody, Minetto, Palermo, New Haven and Central Square all responded, with personnel from Menter Ambulance Services waiting on standby, E911 officials said.  Staff photo
A fire burned down a backyard structure in the town of Volney Wednesday. First responders were called to 65 Distin Road just after 2 p.m., where a fire was burning through a 20-by-30-foot shed that was reportedly used to house chickens. Officials with the Volney Volunteer Fire Corporation said the building appeared to have been mostly burned down by the time a call was placed to authorities. Firefighters remained on the scene until 3:23 p.m., the Oswego County E911 Center reported. No people were injured, but several chickens were reportedly lost in the fire. Fire departments from Volney, Cody, Minetto, Palermo, New Haven and Central Square all responded, with personnel from Menter Ambulance Services waiting on standby, E911 officials said.
Staff photo

Witness denies knowledge of Heidi Allen abduction

Staff Report

A crucial witness in the ongoing hearing as to whether convicted kidnapper Gary Thibodeau deserves another trial for the 1994 disappearance of New Haven teenager Heidi Allen took the stand Friday — and denied ever saying anything.

Jennifer Wescott was recorded speaking to Tonya Priest on a phone call in 2013, implicating Roger Breckenridge, James Steen and Michael Bohrer in the kidnapping. Wescott, an ex-girlfriend of Breckenridge, said on the recorded call that Allen’s abduction was related to cocaine, and her body was burned in a wood stove outside of a cabin on Rice Road in Mexico.

Federal public defender Lisa Peebles, Thibodeau’s attorney, called Wescott as her final witness, and presented various receipts of Facebook conversations, text messages, sworn statements made to police and a transcript of the recorded phone conversation to Wescott.

Wescott made very few concessions over the course of the day’s questioning, but she did testify that she was a cocaine user around the time of Allen’s abduction and that she met Breckenridge some time in 1994.

District Attorney Greg Oakes offered Wescott immunity for any statements she might make, freeing her from the fear of being prosecuted for perjury.

“Did you say cocaine was the reason Heidi Allen got abducted?” Peebles asked.

Wescott asserted on the stand that what she was saying was that she did cocaine.

“All I said was I was young and on cocaine,” she said.

According to Wescott, she turned 18 on Feb. 18, 1995, what she called her “eight ball birthday.” “We went and bought an eight ball of coke and sat there and sniffed it,” she said.

According to both Breckenridge and Wescott, it was the date their romantic relationship began.

Wescott also said she used to babysit for Breckenridge’s five children with his wife Tracey, and would sometimes be paid in cocaine.

On the cross examination, Oakes asked why Wescott answered in the affirmative in her conversation with Priest when Priest began mentioning Allen.

“I lied to Tonya a lot in this conversation,” she said. “I told Tonya a lot of lies.” Wescott painted Priest as a woman demanding of attention, and said she would agree with Priest to placate her.

In reference to Facebook conversations with a friend named Carl Robinson, in which Wescott indicated that she didn’t want to be the next one to turn up dead, Wescott said the messages sent from her account were someone else.

“Several people have access to my account,” she said. “I have children. I have multiple friends.” During his cross-examination, Oakes asked Wescott if she had any information that could potentially free a man who served 20 years of a 25 to life prison sentence.

Wescott said she had no information, and had shared everything she knows. She said, as a mother of three, she would gladly share any information that would lead to the discovery of Allen’s body and bring any potential accomplices or anyone who committed the crime instead to justice.

The hearing will resume the week of March 23, when Oakes begins calling witnesses.