Category Archives: Other News

2015 Treasure Fulton Parks Medallion Hunt begins today

First Medallion Hunt and daily stones search clues appear belowValley News Treasure Our Parks Medallion Hunt 2014 Map(1) 2

The first clue of the Treasure Fulton Parks 2015 Medallion Hunt, brought to you by Friends of Fulton Parks, Par-K Enterprises and The Valley news, appears below, as well as on page 6 of today’s edition.

The clue can be used to locate a medallion hidden in one of Fulton’s parks by volunteers from Friends of Fulton Parks. On Saturday, June 27, a second clue on the medallion’s location will appear in both The Valley News and the Oswego County Advertiser. A photo of the medallion appears here, along with a map of Fulton outlining where its parks can be found.

The first person to find the medallion and return it FOFP will be rewarded with a $250 shopping spree courtesy of The Valley News and the participating businesses. The winner will be awarded five $50 gift certificates from their choice of five different businesses who are sponsoring this year’s event. In addition to the medallion, some other items will be hidden during the event that can also be redeemed for prizes.

Each day, a separate clue will appear on www.valleynewsonline.com regarding the locations of some stones (see photo) hidden by FOFP members. These stones will be hidden in a different park each day. Go to that park and find the stone for that day. Try to collect a stone from each of the 10 parks. Each collection will be awarded a playground prize through FOFP.

 

Find one of these four letter tiles: There are no clues for this challenge, but the tiles will be hidden randomly in the parks on the map. Each tile can be redeemed for a $25 gift card. (One per household)
Find one of these four letter tiles: There are no clues for this challenge, but the tiles will be hidden randomly in the parks on the map. Each tile can be redeemed for a $25 gift card. (One per household)

The group will also hide four letter tiles (see photo) throughout the parks. There will be no clues for this search, but anyone who finds a tile will get to redeem it through FOFP for a $25 gift card.

Rules for the treasure hunt:

1. The Treasure Hunt begins at sunrise on Wednesday, June 24, and ends at sunset on Saturday, June 27.

2. The medallion, tiles and stones are all hidden in the 10 parks listed on the map. Search during daylight hours only.

3. Be safe. The items are not hidden near the road or water bodies. Keep your feet on the ground. There is no need to climb or dig. Search at your own risk.

4. The contest is open to all ages. Board members of Friends of Fulton Parks, employees of the Valley News and prior year grand prize winners are not eligible for prizes.

5. The person who finds the medallion or tiles must notify Friends of Fulton Parks as soon as possible, by calling 402-7431. Once verified, the winner will be posted on valleynewsonline.com

6. The grand prize, awarded to whoever finds to medallion, is a $250 shopping spree that includes five $50 gift cards for our participating sponsors, courtesy of the Valley News.

7. Only one prize awarded per household. Winners are responsible for taxes on their winnings.

8. The Valley News, Friends of Fulton Parks, and the City of Fulton are not responsible for any perceived loss or damage related to this contest.

Stones Search Clues: Wednesday 6/24

Find these stones: These stones will be hidden in a different park each day. A clue will be given daily at valleynewsonline.com. Go to that park and find the stone for that day. Try to collect a stone from each of the 10 parks. Each collection will be awarded a playground prize. (One per household)
Find these stones: These stones will be hidden in a different park each day. A clue will be given daily at valleynewsonline.com. Go to that park and find the stone for that day. Try to collect a stone from each of the 10 parks. Each collection will be awarded a playground prize. (One per household)

In 2014, the challenge was to find the park when given its name. This year, a park fact will give you the clue to the location of the stones of the day.

Find today’s stones in these parks:

1) This park is named after the family who built it, near the circle.

2) This park has a toddler playground named for a local author

Medallion Hunt Clue #1:

Find the medallion: See the Medallion Hunt page of The Valley News on June 24 for the first clue. If the medallion is not found in the first 48 hours, a second clue will appear in the June 27 editions of The Valley News and Oswego County Advertiser. Whoever finds the medallion first will win the grand prize, a $250 local shopping spree courtesy of The Valley News.
Find the medallion: See the Medallion Hunt page of The Valley News on June 24 for the first clue. If the medallion is not found in the first 48 hours, a second clue will appear in the June 27 editions of The Valley News and Oswego County Advertiser. Whoever finds the medallion first will win the grand prize, a $250 local shopping spree courtesy of The Valley News.

“I think that I shall never see a poem lovely as a tree” —Joyce Kilmer.

Swing to the left or picnic to the right. Don’t get stumped, choose the right path.

 

 

Eugene R. Saylor

Eugene R. Saylor, 81, of Hannibal, passed away on Tuesday. He will be reunited with his wife Shirley (Livingston) Saylor, who passed away in 2005. Eugene served in the Korean Conflict earning a United Nations Service medal, National Defense Service metal as well as three Bronze Stars. Eugene retired from Container Corporation of America (CCA) in Fulton in 1996. He leaves behind two brothers, Theodore of Arizona and Millard of Arizona, and a sister, Gloria of Ohio; a daughter, Brenda Axtell of Baldwinsville, N.Y.; two sons, Martin (Susan) Saylor of Red Creek, N.Y. and Thomas Saylor of Hannibal, N.Y.; as well as five grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. At Eugene’s request there were no calling hours and a burial will be at the family’s convenience.

Treasure Fulton Parks Medallion Hunt begins Wednesday

Valley News Treasure Our Parks Medallion Hunt 2014 Map(1)
Find the medallion: See the Medallion Hunt page of The Valley News on June 24 for the first clue. If the medallion is not found in the first 48 hours, a second clue will appear in the June 27 editions of The Valley News and Oswego County Advertiser. Whoever finds the medallion first will win the grand prize, a $250 local shopping spree courtesy of The Valley News. Find the medallion: See the Medallion Hunt page of The Valley News on June 24 for the first clue. If the medallion is not found in the first 48 hours, a second clue will appear in the June 27 editions of The Valley News and Oswego County Advertiser. Whoever finds the medallion first will win the grand prize, a $250 local shopping spree courtesy of The Valley News.

 

Find these stones: These stones will be hidden in a different park each day. A clue will be given daily at valleynewsonline.com. Go to that park and find the stone for that day. Try to collect a stone from each of the 10 parks. Each collection will be awarded a playground prize. (One per household)
Find these stones: These stones will be hidden in a different park each day. A clue will be given daily at valleynewsonline.com. Go to that park and find the stone for that day. Try to collect a stone from each of the 10 parks. Each collection will be awarded a playground prize. (One per household)
Find one of these four letter tiles: There are no clues for this challenge, but the tiles will be hidden randomly in the parks on the map. Each tile can be redeemed for a $25 gift card. (One per household)
Find one of these four letter tiles: There are no clues for this challenge, but the tiles will be hidden randomly in the parks on the map. Each tile can be redeemed for a $25 gift card. (One per household)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you know where all your city parks are located?
On Wednesday, Friends of Fulton Parks’ 2015 Teasure Fulton Parks Medallion Hunt will begin with a clue inside The Valley News.
The contest, which is designed to get everyone more acquainted with the 14 beautiful parks the city offers, consists of a medallion being hidden somewhere in one of those parks.
To find the medallion, residents must first read The Valley News. Readers will find the first clue on a special page that spotlights the contest and participating sponsors.
On Saturday, June 27, a second clue will appear in both The Valley News and the Oswego County Advertiser.
A photograph of the medallion appears above. To help out, there also is a map above showing where all the city parks are located.
The first person to find the medallion and return it FOFP will be rewarded with a $250 shopping spree courtesy of the Valley News and the participating businesses. The winner will be awarded five $50 gift certificates from their choice of five different businesses who are sponsoring this year’s event.
The first person to find the medallion and return it FOFP will be rewarded with a $250 shopping spree courtesy of the Valley News and the participating businesses. The winner will be awarded five $50 gift certificates from their choice of five different businesses who are sponsoring this year’s event.
Members of Friends of Fulton Parks came up with the idea for the contest last year when thinking about all the beauty and fun the parks have to offer. Kelley Weaver, board president, thought an event like this might help some residents get to know parks they otherwise might not explore.
“People usually know their one park — the one they like or the one in their neighborhood,” she said. “But what about the others?”
In addition to the medallion, some other items will be hidden during the event that can also be redeemed for prizes. Each day, a separate clue will appear on www.valleynewsonline.com regarding the locations of some stones (see photos) hidden by FOFP members. These stones will be hidden in a different park each day. Go to that park and find the stone for that day. Try to collect a stone from each of the 10 parks. Each collection will be awarded a playground prize through FOFP. The group will also hide four letter tiles (see photos) throughout the parks. There will be no clues for this search, but anyone who finds a tile will get to redeem it through FOFP for a $25 gift card. Several small
The Fulton parks are scattered throughout the city. Three – Bullhead Point, Recreation Park and Indian Point – are on the water. Ten have playgrounds. One is simply a serene place to sit on a bench and gaze at the garden. One honors our veterans.

Rules for the treasure hunt:
1. The Treasure Hunt begins at sunrise on Wednesday, June 24, and ends at sunset on Saturday, June 27.
2. The medallion, tiles and stones are all hidden in the ten parks listed on the map. Search during daylight hours only.
3. Be safe. The items are not hidden near the road or water bodies. Keep your feet on the ground. There is no need to climb or dig. Search at your own risk.
4. The contest is open to all ages. Board members of Friends of Fulton Parks, employees of the Valley News and prior year grand prize winners are not eligible for prizes.
5. The person who finds the medallion or tiles must notify Friends of Fulton Parks as soon as possible, by calling 402-7431. Once verified, the winner will be posted on valleynewsonline.com
6. The grand prize, awarded to whoever finds to medallion, is a $250 shopping spree that includes five $50 gift cards for our participating sponsors, courtesy of the Valley News.
7. Only one prize awarded per household. Winners are responsible for taxes on their winnings.
8. The Valley News, Friends of Fulton Parks, and the City of Fulton are not responsible for any perceived loss or damage related to this contest.

 

 

Hannibal water service project slated to begin in mid-July

By Matthew Reitz

Hannibal officials announced Wednesday that construction on the town’s water service project is slated to begin in mid-July.

Town Supervisor Ron Greenleaf said officials recently held a pre-construction meeting regarding the water service area with representatives from the United States Department of Agriculture Office of Rural Development, the engineering firm C2AE, and Highlander Construction. The tentative start date was set for July 13. Greenleaf said the project should take three to four months to complete.

“It should be done this year unless we get some terrible weather in the fall,” Greenleaf said.

Greenleaf said the project will provide water service to roughly 70 residences. It will cover the balance of Stock Road that was not previously provided water, Fowler Road, and Sixty Six Road from Durbin Road to the other side of Dunham Road. Greenleaf said the project is set to begin on Sixty Six Road because that area has the greatest need for water.

“From what I’ve been told they’re going to start on Sixty Six Road,” he said. “They seem to have the worst wells.”

The entire project is expected to cost $1.457 million. A $682,000 grant is expected to come from the USDA Office of Rural Development, and the town will receive a low interest loan for the remaining $775,000, according to Greenleaf.  The project will bring water service to town properties, but the cost and responsibility for hooking up to the service will fall on the property owners.

Town officials also discussed the possibility of utilizing solar power at the municipal building.

A representative of CNY Solar, Rich Champion, addressed residents and board members about a preliminary plan to bring solar power to the town. The plan is in the initial stages and nothing has been agreed to, but Greenleaf has been working with CNY Solar to find a solution that will save the town money and provide the municipal building with a source of renewable energy.

The plan calls for the town to enter into a power purchase agreement. Through the 20-year agreement, solar panels would be installed behind the municipal building, and the town would purchase the power produced by the panels from a third party owner at a significantly reduced rate.

“With a power purchase agreement you actually only purchase the power that is produced by the solar panels,” Champion said. “Any power that the system produces would be sold to the town at a rate lower than the utility company charges.”

The town currently pays about $0.135 per kilowatt hour, and the proposal in its current state would charge the town about $0.095 per kilowatt-hour. The town uses over 100,000 kilowatt hours each year, officials said.

Gary Thompson, a candidate for town council, asked Champion if the town would still be responsible for delivery charges from utility companies.

“They will not get charged delivery charges,” Champion said. “The power will be produced on site, and they can’t charge you for power that you’ve produced on site.”

Thompson also asked who was responsible for any maintenance that might need to be done on the system. Champion said the third-party owner is responsible, but there are also production guarantees that ensure the owner has incentive to fix a broken or underperforming system. He said at the end of the 20-year contract, the system would become the property of the town. Greenleaf said he would pass the proposal on to the town’s attorney to look at before proceeding.

Other news

The board unanimously approved Joe Burgdorf as a new member of the Zoning Board of Appeals. Greenleaf said Burgdorf was the only resident to send in a letter stating interest in the appointment. The board also unanimously approved a motion to purchase a new computer for the town supervisor’s office. Greenleaf said the computer in his office was at least 12 years old.

Green Team looking to change people’s outlook on littering

Bob Green, chairman of the Green Team, talks about his group’s anti-littering campaign at a community forum in Fulton earlier this year.
Bob Green, chairman of the Green Team, talks about his group’s anti-littering campaign at a community forum in Fulton earlier this year.

By Matthew Reitz

A group of volunteers has established an anti-littering movement that they hope will take hold throughout Oswego County.

The Green Team, led by Chairman Robert Green, is a subcommittee of the Oswego County Tourism Advisory Council that was formed in October 2014 to spread an anti-littering message across the county. Green said there are many positive efforts by groups to pick up litter, but the Green Team is also trying to stop the littering before it happens.

“Nobody is trying to stop the litter,” Green said. “All the efforts of public awareness are gone.”

Members of the Green Team recently met to discuss ways to promote their campaign. The team is looking for ways to bolster public awareness and educate the community on both the effects of littering and what they can do to help combat the problem.

“We want a clean area for tourists and the community,” Green said.

Green said he would like to see more “no littering” signs put up around the county and have better enforcement on violations. The group is currently working with state Sen. Patty Ritchie’s office to put anti-littering signs up on roadways and in parks across the county. Green said a lack of signage and commendable efforts to clean up roadways and parks sends a message to the public that there will always be someone to pick up their trash.

“People always think someone else will pick it up,” Green said.

According to the group, the efforts to clean up trash are not worthless, but they don’t correct the problem. He said fast food packaging, beer cans and cigarette butts are the most frequent items littered.

The group is working with schools to send an anti-littering message to children. A recycling campaign will generate funds to put drinking fountains in schools that can easily fill up individual water bottles and help cut back on the growing use of plastic bottles.

“The idea is working with the kids to educate them,” Green said.

He added that the kids he’s working with are doing a terrific job recycling.

The campaign is also focused on litter from motor vehicles that ends up scattered across roadways throughout the county. Green said this an area of major concern in Oswego County. He feels auto manufacturers should build trash receptacles into vehicles. In an effort the confront that issue, the group is purchasing litter bags for vehicles and distributing them to school children.

By involving children in the process, Green feels anti-littering sentiment can grow from the bottom up.

“The goal is for the children to take and give them to parents and educate the parents to help build awareness,” Green said. “The goal is that children will educate parents and create public awareness from the bottom up.”