Category Archives: Other News

Granby students persevere

Elizabeth Chrisman and Riley Lunn were among the students selected by their teachers for their exemplary behavior and representation of the month’s behavioral expectation: perseverance. The students selected were treated to a special breakfast with Principal Heather Perry (middle).
Elizabeth Chrisman and Riley Lunn were among the students selected by their teachers for their exemplary behavior and representation of the month’s behavioral expectation: perseverance. The students selected were treated to a special breakfast with Principal Heather Perry (middle).

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

March’s character education trait in the Fulton City School District was perseverance.

Students at Granby Elementary School selected at best representing that character trait were treated to a special breakfast with Principal Heather Perry.

Over a meal of breakfast pizza, fruit cups, cereal and juice, Perry asked students if they could define perseverance.

One student described perseverance as facing many obstacles, but never giving up.

The following students were honored with the breakfast and each received a special certificate: Angelina Ferro, Jadriel Baez, Allison Treneer, Lucian Perkins, Avery Nunez, James Carden, Natalie Mcrae, Lily Mccoy, Zachary Brown, Mylea Calabro, Hannay Mackey, Jeffery Landers, Lyle Cole, Junior Gomez, Hailey Payment, Brielle Sievers, Miguel Sanderson, Daniel Demott-Smith, Savanna Flynn, Dylan Sullivan, Madison McCarty-Castillo, Gabby Farnham, Preston Collett, Nathaniel Sivalia, Adrienne Santos, Skylar Blake, Nicholas Smith, Kaylee Holmes, Elise Morse, Aiden Trude, Adyson Shepard, Jasmine Clew, Donald Gates, Ethan Bardin, Cameron Brown, Aiyanna Kolb-Kee, Rose Mills, Reese Calkins, Nick Mariotti, Riley Lunn, Walter Crofoot, Rebecca Stone, Elizabeth Chrisman, Chloe Bonoffski, Jillian Crandall, Sean Hein, Dominic Berry, Leah Mansfield, Hannah Rice, Montanna Gardinier, Chelsea Redman, Morgan Schuyler, Makayla Nolin and Conner Schneider.

Learn to paint silk scarves

Cindy Schmidt demonstrating the techniques used for Hand Painted Silk Scarves.
Cindy Schmidt demonstrating the techniques used for Hand Painted Silk Scarves.

Anyone who has ever wanted to learn how to make hand-painted silk scarves should take an upcoming class at Lakeside Artisans, 191 W. First St., Oswego.

The class will be held from 10 a.m. to noon, Saturday, April 29.

Cindy Schmidt will show how to use the resist and dye method to decorate a silk scarf. Each participant will produce a scarf of their own design. All materials will be provided. There is a class limit of 6 participants.

This is another in the series of educational experiences for adults put on by Lakeside Artisans.

To register for a class, a non-refundable registration fee of $10 is required. The deposit may be delivered to the store or mailed to Lakeside Artisans, 191 W. First St., Oswego NY 13126.

The total class fee is $45, which includes the registration fee.

For additional information, call 342-8880, go to lakesideartisans.com  or visit Lakeside Artisans us on Facebook.

Entrepreneur SUNY Oswego’s honors convocation speaker

Tracy Higginbotham
Tracy Higginbotham

Submitted by SUNY Oswego

Living her passion every day fuels Tracy Chamberlain Higginbotham, a 1986 SUNY Oswego graduate who will be the featured speaker at the college’s Honors Convocation.

The ceremony will begin at 3 p.m. April 11 in the Campus Center’s arena and convocation hall.

When Higginbotham addresses the 115 honors recipients and their supporters that Friday, she will speak about her own experiences, and she will encourage audience members, no matter what their goals, majors or ages, to find the nexus of their personal and corporate passions.

“I believe that we are most fulfilled, and our contributions to society are most effective, when we work in a profession that fits that overriding passion,” Higginbotham says.

Founder and president of Women TIES (Women Together Inspiring Entrepreneurial Success), Higginbotham helps female small business owners expand their economic opportunities by connecting with and supporting one another.

The group serves 300 members with 60 volunteers in six regional districts of New York state.

“My corporate mission is the same as my personal mission,” she says. “I have been constant in my beliefs and in my advocacy for women entrepreneurs.”

As a small business owner herself for 15 years — she founded an events management company, Five Star Events, in 1995 — Higginbotham knows firsthand the needs of her colleagues.

By 2005, she says, she embraced her passion for helping other women entrepreneurs and created her second company, Women TIES, to foster larger and stronger economic networks among women across the state.

Role models

Higginbotham, eldest of eight siblings, says her advocacy for women stems from her early observations of successful women who were close to her. Her mother and an aunt were both small business owners, and a 1931 SUNY Oswego alumna, the late Olive Brannan Spargo, served as an important mentor to Higginbotham in her late teens.

“I had such strong women to guide me that I developed love and respect for women who are engaged in interesting ventures,” Higginbotham says. “My mother and aunt were each in business in the 1960s, a time when women were just emerging in such roles.”

Spargo, who had been a public school teacher and active Oswego volunteer, lived in Rome, Oneida County, where Higginbotham grew up.

“She tapped me on the shoulder when I was 16 to take a leadership role greeting potential SUNY Oswego students in our hometown, and she was a great influence on me from that time on,” Higginbotham said.

Spargo was instrumental in bringing Higginbotham back to the SUNY Oswego family after she graduated to work for the Alumni Relations Office and in encouraging her to serve as one of the youngest members of the Oswego Alumni Association board of directors.

“Women have helped me,” Higginbotham says. “They have been inspirational and practical in their assistance. It is my intention to carry this help forward.”

Her professional success in small business and leadership has been recognized extensively, including two awards, in 2005 and 2011, from the New York State Small Business Administration.

Amid her busy professional life, she still makes her affiliation with SUNY Oswego a priority.

“I wanted to be involved in everything at SUNY Oswego from the moment I got there,” says Higginbotham, who lives with her husband and two sons in Central New York.

“It’s natural for people to love their alma maters, but I am impressed that Oswego had so much to offer. I’ll always be grateful for my education there and for the people I’ve met along the way.”

Higginbotham graduated from SUNY Oswego with a bachelor’s degree in business administration.

She continued with graduate studies in business management and now serves on the advisory board of Oswego’s School of Business in addition to several other board memberships in Central New York.

Deadline May 3 to register for MASH Camp

Learning how to suture at last year’s Oswego Hospital MASH Camp was Megan Lagoe, of Oswego. Offering his expertise is Oswego Hospital Surgeon Aleksandr Sokolovsky, D.O. The goal of the two-day camp is to introduce healthcare careers to students entering eighth and ninth grades. The application deadline is May 3.
Learning how to suture at last year’s Oswego Hospital MASH Camp was Megan Lagoe, of Oswego. Offering his expertise is Oswego Hospital Surgeon Aleksandr Sokolovsky, D.O. The goal of the two-day camp is to introduce healthcare careers to students entering eighth and ninth grades. The application deadline is May 3.

Area students entering the eighth or ninth grade in the fall can learn more about healthcare careers this July at Oswego Hospital’s MASH Camp.

While July may be a few months away, the application deadline is May 3.

This year’s MASH Camp (Medical Academy of Science and Health) at Oswego Hospital will be 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 30 and 31.

During the camp, students have the opportunity to take part in hands-on activities, such as learning how to suture, which is taught by the hospital surgery center staff.

There will also be tours of many departments, providing the students with a behind-the-scenes look at the hospital and the variety of jobs offered in a healthcare setting.

All campers will receive hospital scrubs to wear each day at camp, breakfast and lunch, a T-shirt and education materials. The camp fee is $30 per student.

The camp is coordinated by the Central New York Area Health Education Center, which also offers scholarships to those students who need help paying the fee.

Space is limited to 20 students at M.A.S.H. Camp and applications will be reviewed by a selection process. Students can access the online application by visiting the CNYAHEC website at www.cnyahec.org.

PORKY & BUDDY: Shoes not a chew toy for black lab

Screen shot 2014-04-01 at 10.22.40 AMDear Porky and Buddy,

I just adopted Barney, a nine-month old black lab.

We have been going to training classes and he is dong very well.  He is house trained and really just a perfect companion and I am so happy to have him in my life.

But there is one thing. Several times in the last month I have come home from work to find that he has destroyed the heel of one of my shoes.  I love Barney, don’t get me wrong, but I love my Jimmy Choos too.  I keep them in a closet, but he actually opens the door to the closet!

What can I do to correct this behavior?

 Chelsea

 

Dear Chelsea,

We are thinking that they are called Jimmy “Choos” for a reason. Get it???

Think about it — nice leather, wrapped around what for all intents and purposes looks like a Nylabone. Of course he has figured out how to open the closet door to get at them.

Remember that chewing is a natural behavior for dogs, as they use their mouths to investigate the environment. It also helps them keep their teeth clean and strong and exercises their mouth and jaw muscles.

Dogs who seem to be chewing too much, however, especially if it mostly happens when they are home alone, may be  simply bored or lonely or anxious.

Does Barney have a crate that he can stay in when you are at work? That would lessen his anxiety, especially if he has a couple of real chew toys in there with him to keep him occupied.

If crating is not an option, you really need to “chew proof” your house, or at least that part of the house where he stays when you are away.

Lock those expensive shoes up high somewhere that he really can’t open.  What else does he chew inappropriately?  The TV remote? Magazines?  Your sunglasses?

Be very careful that all of these chew toy-sized accessories are way out of his reach.

The Jimmy Choos are probably harmless, but he can seriously hurt himself by swallowing thinks like sharp plastic pieces or electronic parts.

At the same time, where ever he is in the house when you are gone, make sure  he has great, indestructible, meant to be chew toys available to him. He is going to be a big strong boy, so you need  to look for things like Boomer balls, Nylabones, Kongs, or Tug-a-Jugs.

Some of them are made with cavities that you can fill with small treats so they are even more fun for him.

When you do get  home, spend a lot of time with Barney. Take him for walks. Play Frisbee with him (with an indestructible Kong Frisbee).

Give him lots of  cuddle and play time, so that when you do have to leave again, he will nap happily, waiting for your return. He is always going to be way more fun than a pair of shoes!

Speaking of things that pets eat — Could you donate some dry Purina cat or kitten food to the Humane Society?

We use a lot of it for our foster cats.  You could just drop it off any time in our outer office at 265 W. First St., Oswego, or call us at 207-1070 and we will make arrangements. Thanks!

The Oswego County Humane Society provides spay/neuter services and assistance, fostering and adoption of animals in urgent need, humane education programs, and information and referrals to animal lovers throughout Oswego County.

Our office is located at 265 W. First St., Oswego. Phone is 207-1070. Email is ochscontact@hotmail.com. Website is  www.oswegohumane.org

Fulton students learn ‘who grew the soup’

Lynne Field’s first-grade class at Fairgrieve Elementary School listen to Ag Literacy Week volunteer Erica Schreiner read them the story “Who Grew My Soup” by Tom Darbyshire. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oswego County coordinated Ag Literacy Week activities at the school as a way to get students thinking about where their food comes and what food is grown and harvested in Oswego County.
Lynne Field’s first-grade class at Fairgrieve Elementary School listen to Ag Literacy Week volunteer Erica Schreiner read them the story “Who Grew My Soup” by Tom Darbyshire. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oswego County coordinated Ag Literacy Week activities at the school as a way to get students thinking about where their food comes and what food is grown and harvested in Oswego County.

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

Where does food come from?

That’s the question first-graders at Fairgrieve Elementary School in Fulton talked about during Ag Literacy Week.

Erica Schreiner, a volunteer coordinated through Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oswego County, stopped at the school during the state-wide literacy campaign to read to students the book “Who Grew My Soup” by Tom Darbyshire.

The students munched and crunched on healthy carrot snacks as she talked to the classes about eating healthy. They all then played a ‘Let’s Make Soup” game in which she got the students thinking about where their food comes from and what items are grown and harvested in Oswego County.

Ag Literacy Week is a New York state Agriculture in the Classroom initiative celebrated the week of March 17 through 21. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oswego County coordinates the educational outreach program for the Fulton City School District, organizing a literacy volunteer to stop by classrooms to discuss the importance of agriculture.

As part of the Ag Literacy Week program, the Fairgrieve Elementary School Library receives a free copy of the program’s featured book to keep in circulation for the students to sign out at their leisure.

Scotsman employee to conduct book signing

Elizabeth Marie Fortune poses with her newly released book, “Shhh, Quiet, Listen: What Do You Hear When You Listen for God?”  Photo by Elizabeth Stassi
Elizabeth Marie Fortune poses with her newly released book, “Shhh, Quiet, Listen: What Do You Hear
When You Listen for God?”
Photo by Elizabeth Stassi

By Ashley M. Casey 

Oswego native Elizabeth Marie Fortune will be signing copies of her first children’s book, “Shhh, Quiet, Listen: What Do You Hear When You Listen for God?” at the Connection Point in Oswego on April 5.

The picture book follows a little girl named Faith and her journey to listen to God in everyday life, whether she is at school with her friends or spending time with her grandparents.

Fortune,  a customer service representative with the Scotsman Media Group’s  commercial printing department, now lives in Camillus with her husband, William, and their 7-year-old daughter, Erin. She published the book through Inspiring Voices, an Indiana-based publishing company that specializes in spiritual literature.

Fortune began writing the book in 2009 while at home with Erin and found that many of the books she read to her daughter lacked a spiritual message.

“I started reading books and I saw there was a need for this type of book,” Fortune said. “As Erin was getting older, that’s when the concept came about because I saw how kids are really busy.”

Fortune said part of the book’s message is to take time from one’s busy day to be thankful.

“I’m also hoping that the book will open up a dialogue with parents and their children to start talking about God and how important it is to think about God each day,” she said. “Hopefully, the book will help children connect with God.”

Fortune said the process of creating the book was “really exciting.”

“When you see it, you just see your manuscript on two pages of paper. It’s so exciting to finally see it come together,” she said. Fortune worked closely with an illustrator from Inspiring Voices to create the finished product.

“Every page on the book is directed by me — every scene, color schemes … That was exciting, to see your vision come to life.”

The hardest part of the process for Fortune was time management, balancing life as a working mother with writing the book. She said her husband and daughter both have been involved in the process.

“He’s been so supportive regarding time management. He’s actually helping me with marketing my book (and) handling the business end of things. So therefore it’s a family endeavor,” Fortune said.

Fortune is looking to expand distribution of “Shhh, Quiet, Listen,” and the book is available on amazon.com and barnesandnoble.com. “I’m working on plans now, reaching out to different outlets for the book, not just locally, but regionally and nationally,” Fortune said.

She added she plans to write a series of religious children’s books to follow “Shhh, Quiet, Listen.”

Fortune will be signing copies of “Shhh, Quiet, Listen” from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.  Saturday, April 5, at the Connection Point, 198 W. First St., Oswego. The Connection Point will have copies of the book for sale during and after Saturday’s book signing. To learn more about the Connection Point, call 216-6455 or visit theconnectionpt.com and facebook.com/theconnectionpoint.

Group out to kill invasive species giant hogweed in Oswego County

Giant hogweed plant
Giant hogweed plant

Partners of the SLELO-PRISM (St. Lawrence Eastern Lake Ontario – Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management) will again be busy controlling giant hogweed plants in the eastern Lake Ontario region.

More than 61 sites spread across five counties — including Oswego County — are scheduled to be treated. Counties included in this effort are St. Lawrence, Jefferson, Lewis, Oneida and cswego Counties.

“Giant Hogweed poses a serious threat to anyone who comes into contact with the sap from the plant,” said Rob Williams, PRISM coordinator. “The sap, combined with sunlight, creates a photosensitive reaction on human skin which can cause serious burns and blisters and eventual scarring.”

“Due to the biology of this plant, we believe it is still possible to eradicate local populations of Giant Hogweed,” Williams said. “Since the beginning of the program in 2011 we have achieved a 33 percent reduction in active hogweed sites.”

Techniques used to control this plant include cutting the root of the plant just below the ground surface, applying herbicides and removing the flowering seed head just before seed drop.

The main stem/stalk of the giant hogweed plant with identifying purple blotches and white hairs
The main stem/stalk of the giant hogweed plant with identifying purple blotches and white hairs

The group’s work takes place primarily on public property and rights-of-way. The most effective and “safe” way for landowners to control this plant on private property is to apply over-the-counter herbicides in accordance with their labels.

Invasive species of plants, animals, insects and microorganisms are among the most serious threats to native species, habitats and ecosystems within the five-county areas that define the St. Lawrence Eastern Lake Ontario (SLELO) region.

Invasive species interfere with many types of outdoor recreation. They reduce crop yields and interfere with harvest operations on local farms.

Along public roads and highways, invasive plants restrict visibility and create roadside hazards. Invasive insects and diseases kill trees in forested areas as well as along community streets.

The economic impact of invasive species in the United States alone has been estimated at 120 billion annually.

Local communities have been challenged with controlling invasive species or remediating their impacts at costs ranging from several thousand to millions of dollars.

For more information on Giant Hogweed, visit the SLELO website at sleloinvasives.org.

To report a sighting call the Giant Hogweed Hotline at 845-256-3111.