Category Archives: Other News

Woodward seeking re-election this year

By Colin Hogan
Ron Woodward Sr. announced this week that he will be seeking another term as Fulton’s mayor this fall.
The Republican incumbent is currently on the tail end of his second consecutive term as the city’s mayor. If re-elected, he would enter his fourth overall mayoral term. In all, his history as a Fulton public servant includes 14 years as a city councilor, 10 years as mayor and four years as the mayor’s executive assistant.
Woodward first served on the Common Council from 1982 until 1986, at which point he began his first term as mayor. After serving what at that time was a two-year term, Woodward then took a hiatus from the city government in the late ’80s while he battled cancer. In 1994, he was again elected to the council, on which he served consecutive terms from 1995 to 2004. From 2004 to 2008, Woodward served as then-Fulton Mayor Daryl Hayden’s executive assistant. He then assumed the mayoral office again in 2008, serving what are now four-year terms. After winning re-election in 2011, he is now serving what will have been his second consecutive, and third overall, term as mayor.
Woodward said Wednesday that he’s proud of his record as a public servant in Fulton and he’s willing to take on any opponents who emerge.
“The city has certainly had some hard times, and we’ve always done the best we could,” Woodward said. “If there’s someone else out there who the public thinks can do a better job and they beat me, so be it.”
Members of the Fulton Republican Committee — which has been advertising for potential candidates for mayor, the Common Council and Fulton’s county legislature seats — met with Woodward Saturday morning. According to Woodward, the subcommittee offered him financial support and help with circulating petitions, but did not specify whether they will continue to search for other possible mayoral candidates.
FRC Chairman Marc Holliday said Wednesday the committee would still like to hear from any Republicans interested in running for mayor, but that he, personally, wouldn’t be opposed to endorsing Woodward. He said the committee is just trying to get more people participating in the process.
“It’s nothing against Ron. I like Ron. I think he’s done a lot of good things, given the state the city is currently in,” said Holliday. “We just want to get more people involved. The more choice, the better. Getting some new blood in there is always a good thing.”
As of Wednesday, Woodward was the only mayoral candidate the subcommittee had interviewed. Holliday said after meeting with the subcommittee, all candidates then have to meet with the full Republican committee before any endorsements are made. He estimated that endorsements would be announced by early June.
Woodward noted that the FRC’s four-person subcommittee consists of Holliday and Mark Sherman — each of whom ran against Woodward in the 2007 election — along with Holliday’s wife and his son. He said he plans to run regardless of whether he ends up receiving the Republican committee’s support.
“I’m not asking their permission to run,” Woodward said. “I’ll be running with or without their support.”

No more tracks

A six-year-long effort to remove the railroad tracks that cross state Route 481 next to the Nestlé Avenue intersection finally came to an end recently. The tracks were removed by line owner CSX with assistance from the Fulton Department of Public Works on April 30. City officials said the effort was executed quickly and flawlessly, causing as little impact as possible to the high-traffic byway, which reportedly sees more than 22,000 vehicles per day. Mayor Ron Woodward Sr. and members of the Common Council praised CSX and the DPW for their work, but most of all acknowledged the continued efforts made by Cathy Trowbridge of the mayor's office, who finally brought the project to fruition.  Colin Hogan photo
A six-year-long effort to remove the railroad tracks that cross state Route 481 next to the Nestlé Avenue intersection finally came to an end recently. The tracks were removed by line owner CSX with assistance from the Fulton Department of Public Works on April 30. City officials said the effort was executed quickly and flawlessly, causing as little impact as possible to the high-traffic byway, which reportedly sees more than 22,000 vehicles per day. Mayor Ron Woodward Sr. and members of the Common Council praised CSX and the DPW for their work, but most of all acknowledged the continued efforts made by Cathy Trowbridge of the mayor’s office, who finally brought the project to fruition.
Colin Hogan photo

Memorial Day Salute coming together in Fulton

By Colin Hogan

Organizers are getting ready for the 34th annual Memorial Day Salute in Fulton, which will be held this year on Saturday, May 23.

True to tradition, the celebration will kick off with the annual Memorial Day parade through town at 10 a.m., which this year will be themed “Remember Those Who Served.”

In a release on the parade, the Memorial Day Salute Committee said they wanted the theme to encourage thanks from the community to all those who have served in conflicts past and present.

“Our community has many heroes who are serving or have served in the present conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, as well as veterans who have served their country over the years. These men and women ask for nothing from their fellow American citizens, so it is time to honor them on this Memorial Day weekend. Therefore, this year‘s parade is in honor of all those who have served their country,” the committee stated.

So far, at least 10 bands have signed up to participate in the parade, including the G. Ray Bodley High School Marching Band, Central New York Police and Firemen’s Band, City of Syracuse Highland Pipe and Drums, Camden Fife and Drum Corps, Central Square Middle School Band, Original Yanks Drum & Bugle Corps, Pembroke High School Marching Band, Naples High School Marching Band, Island Band and Downbeat Percussion — the official drumline for the Buffalo Bills.

The parade will also feature several floats made by local businesses and organizations. Organizers said anyone interested in entering a float, a marching group or a vehicle in the parade should contact parade chair Zach Menter at 591-4502 as soon as possible to get an application form.

Menter described this year’s lineup of floats and bands as “very exciting” and said that parade preparations have been going very smoothly.

“Everything seems to be coming together well,” Menter said. “We’ve got a lot of good stuff going on this year, and a lot to look forward to.”

Serving as the parade’s grand marshall this year will be John Young, Fulton’s 2015 “Veteran of the Year.”

Each year, the celebration is coordinated by members of Fulton’s four service clubs —Kiwanis, Lions, Sunrise Rotary and Rotary — as well as some city officials and representatives from the Fulton Veterans Council. MDS Committee Chair Larry Macner said the committee has been doing “a fantastic job” pulling the event together.

“Everyone on the committee is working really hard and doing great just getting everything together,” Macner said. “We’ve got some really good talent on that committee and all the work they’ve put into this over the years has made the process easy.”

While the formerly two-day event was reduced to only one day last year, publicity chair Holly Carpenter noted that the rides are still expected to be set up Friday evening and would be open for kids to use then, even though the event doesn’t formally start until Saturday morning.

Providing entertainment Saturday evening will be reputed central New York show band The Billionaires.

Macner said, in addition to coming out and enjoying the fun and entertainment, he hopes community members will remember the real reason they’re celebrating that weekend.

“We only have two holidays a year for our veterans, so we hope people take the time to think about what this is all for, in addition to enjoying the entertainment,” Macner said.

Both Carpenter and Macner said, as it has been every year, the event’s turnout will largely hinge on the weekend’s weather.

“Last year the weather was great and we had a really big turnout, but the year before it was raining and attendance suffered,” Carpenter said.

Macner said the committee will be checking the forecast for that weekend “up until the last minute and be hoping for the best.”

To learn more about this year’s event or to reach out to the committee, visit www.fultonmemorialdaysalute.com.

Hundreds turn out to hear Josh Batstone in Fulton

By Matthew Reitz

Over 500 people showed up to see Josh Batsone in concert at the Fulton War Memorial on Friday night.

Fans of Batstone and NBC’s “The Voice” got the chance to see a performance many of them had long been waiting for after his stint on the program in March. Diane Garcia of Oswego, who brought her 10- and 12-year-old grandsons to the concert, said they are big fans of “The Voice” and felt let down after Batstone appeared only briefly.

Garcia said she and her grandsons were excited about the concert and the opportunity to meet Batstone afterwards.

“It’s special when it’s somebody local,” Garcia said.

The 18-year-old Fulton native was accompanied on stage by 26-year-old Billy Harrison of Syracuse. Harrison also accompanied Savannah Harmon, the opening act.

In interviews prior to the event, Batstone said he was excited for the concert in his hometown, and saw it as an opportunity for the community to come together for a night.

“This is a moment we can come together as a community,” Batstone said as he began the show.

The nearly two-hour performance was followed by a meet-and-greet with the crowd, in which Batstone, Harrison and Harmon spent roughly another two hours taking photos with fans and signing autographs. The trio stayed until they got a chance to meet every fan.

Batstone’s parents, Nicole and Michael, said they were “very happy” with the concert’s turnout, with Michael noting that the crowd was “respectful and impassioned.”

Nicole said her son’s rise to notoriety has been “a little overwhelming,” having been by Josh’s side through his time on “The Voice,” and said it was hard to describe what the experience has been like.

“It’s a journey and you just see what happens,” Nicole said.

After the concert, Batstone called the show “an incredible success” and thanked everyone for coming.

“It was pretty awesome — my first concert after ‘The Voice,’” Batstone said. “The turnout was exactly what I was expecting.”

Batstone said he has a few more concerts in the works and would like to record an album in the not-too-distant future.

“We are definitely going to try to get an EP out,” Batstone said.

Nicole said Batstone planned to use some of the money from the concert to help pay for time in a studio. A portion of the proceeds will also go to Fulton Knee High and Lady Raiders basketball.

Batstone said he will have at least two more concerts in the area before moving to New York City to pursue a career in music. He is excited to be performing June 5 at the Westcott Theatre in Syracuse. His mother said he would also be playing at the 93Q Summer Jam on June 8 in Baldwinsville.

Wildfire burns more than 9 acres outside Phoenix, fire consumed over 400 discarded tires

Some firefighters on the scene return to their base camp set up along September Drive. Personnel from agencies in both Oswego and Onondaga counties battled the blaze for more than five hours Sunday.
Some firefighters on the scene return to their base camp set up along September Drive. Personnel from agencies in both Oswego and Onondaga counties battled the blaze for more than five hours Sunday.

By Colin Hogan

Scores of emergency responders representing nearly 20 agencies battled a massive wildfire outside of Phoenix Sunday that claimed over nine acres of wooded ground and more than 400 discarded tires.

The Onondaga County Sheriff's Office' s Air-1 helicopter drops water down on a wildfire and burning tires just off state Route 48 in the vicinity of County Line Road.
The Onondaga County Sheriff’s Office’ s Air-1 helicopter drops water down on a wildfire and burning tires just off state Route 48 in the vicinity of County Line Road.

For more than five hours Sunday, 12 emergency response agencies from Oswego County and four others from Onondaga County, along with state forest rangers, collaborated to tackle a fire that officials say burned through about 9.5 acres of wooded ground over the course of the day, including roughly a quarter-acre’s worth of discarded tires that were in its path. The fire, which was called in a little before 3 p.m., was located beyond a residential area between state Route 48 and the Oswego River in the vicinity of County Line Road.

Oswego County Fire Coordinator Don Forbes estimated that anywhere from 400 to 450 tires were caught up in the blaze.

“Those were the stubborn part. That’s what took so long. We ended up having to bring in a lot of water to get the tires out,” Forbes said.

Throughout the day, departments had five tanker trucks continuously hauling water to the scene, as well as the Onondaga County Sheriff’s Office’s Air-1 helicopter dropping loads of water from above. Heavy equipment was also used to break up the piles of burning tires to make them easier for firefighters to manage, Forbes said.

Forbes said conditions were optimal for a wildfire to spread, with warmth, low humidity and winds all culminating to create a critical environment. As of Monday, Oswego County was one of several throughout the region to have a red flag warning in effect with regard to fire conditions.

“The reason for the red warning right now is high heat, low humidity and winds, which are ideal for brush fires,” Forbes said. “People think that since we had a lot of snow melt that it’s not dry out there, but it’s very dry. We haven’t had much real rain in the last month or so, and it’s not as wet out there as people think it is.”

The fire mostly spread along the wooded area’s undergrowth. Forbes said the flames were “not very big, but just kept running” due to the location and weather conditions.

Firefighters set up two areas from which to stage their efforts: one along September Drive and the other off County Line Road. Combating a fire in that area took serious physical effort from those involved on the ground, with firefighters having to navigate through thick undergrowth in their heavy gear. Forbes said a forest ranger also led a crew through the area cutting down dead trees and clearing other things that might contribute to the spread of the fire.

“Woods are hard to access, and these guys were out there with tanks on their backs and dragging equipment along with them,” Forbes said. “We’re talking about a lot of hard work and a lot of manpower used to get this done.”

Officials believe the fire was started by a resident in that area burning trash in a burn barrel, which Forbes noted is illegal. The county’s burn ban, which went into effect in mid-March, remains in effect until mid-May. Forbes said, in addition to the burn ban, the county has a policy that prohibits the burning of trash year-round.

“When the burn ban expires in a couple weeks, people can have campfires and other small fires, but they still can’t have burn barrels for trash and garbage. That is banned all year long,” Forbes said.

Forbes said the state Department of Environmental Conservation is in charge of investigating the incident, and will ultimately decide whether tickets and/or charges will follow.

N&N dance recitals set for May 8-9 at GRB

N&N Studio of Dance will present its annual recital, entitled “Uptown Funk” this year, on Friday, May 8 at 7 p.m. and Saturday, May 9 at 1 p.m. at G. Ray Bodley High School in Fulton.  Tickets can be purchased at the door.
Photos provided

“Amazing Tot” Baby Ballet  Pictured from left to right, back row, Kinsley Shortslef, Kenlee Farrands, Molly Smith, and Sophia Briand. Front row, Isabella Piraino, Grace Keefe, Lonna Bomgren, and Madison Taylor. This group will be performing on Friday, May 8th at 7 p.m.
“Amazing Tot” Baby Ballet
Pictured from left to right, back row, Kinsley Shortslef, Kenlee Farrands, Molly Smith, and Sophia Briand. Front row, Isabella Piraino, Grace Keefe, Lonna Bomgren, and Madison Taylor. This group will be performing on Friday, May 8th at 7 p.m.
“Happy Sparkling Ballerina” Preschool Ballet & Tap Group Pictured from left to right, back row, Alyvia Williams, Morgan Sheldon, Harlow Chrisman, Riley Trude, Everleigh Nye, and Isabella Winterhalt.  Front row, Cameron Hoxie, Kinleigh Weaver, Cadence Nipper, and Rileigh Tryt.  This group will be performing on Saturday, May 9 at 1 p.m.
“Happy Sparkling Ballerina” Preschool Ballet & Tap Group Pictured from left to right, back row, Alyvia Williams, Morgan Sheldon, Harlow Chrisman, Riley Trude, Everleigh Nye, and Isabella Winterhalt. Front row, Cameron Hoxie, Kinleigh Weaver, Cadence Nipper, and Rileigh Tryt. This group will be performing on Saturday, May 9 at 1 p.m.
“A Genuine Ballerina” Mini Ballet & Tap Group Pictured left to right, back row, Kara Beckwith, Kelci Watkins, Cadie Shepard, and Jordynn Miller.  Front row, Brooke Seymour, Jolene St. Phillips, and MacKenna LaBarge. This group will perform on Friday, May 8 at 7 p.m.
“A Genuine Ballerina” Mini Ballet & Tap Group
Pictured left to right, back row, Kara Beckwith, Kelci Watkins, Cadie Shepard, and Jordynn Miller. Front row, Brooke Seymour, Jolene St. Phillips, and MacKenna LaBarge. This group will perform on Friday, May 8 at 7 p.m.
“Lil’ Miss Swagger” Hip Hop Group Pictured left to right, back row, Julie Ricker, Keira Scott, Krysta Earle, Megan Flint, Miranda Laws, Rebekah Manwaring, and Paige Ball.  Front row, Amaya Crutchley, Ellie Parkhurst, Jenna Ricker, Savannah Mirabito, Lilylyn Humiston-Seaton, and Emma Huntley. To perform Friday and Saturday.
“Lil’ Miss Swagger” Hip Hop Group
Pictured left to right, back row, Julie Ricker, Keira Scott, Krysta Earle, Megan Flint, Miranda Laws, Rebekah Manwaring, and Paige Ball. Front row, Amaya Crutchley, Ellie Parkhurst, Jenna Ricker, Savannah Mirabito, Lilylyn Humiston-Seaton, and Emma Huntley. To perform Friday and Saturday.
“Let Your Heart Sing” Ballet Pictured left to right, back row, Asialyn Hernandez, Miranda Laws, Krysta Earle, Paige Ball, and Savannah Mirabito.  Middle row, Jaya Whitehead, Emily Case, Maddison Blake, and Desiree Brown.  Front row, Lilly Cunningham, Caden Paro, and Ellie Parkhurst.  To perform on May 8 and May 9.
“Let Your Heart Sing” Ballet
Pictured left to right, back row, Asialyn Hernandez, Miranda Laws, Krysta Earle, Paige Ball, and Savannah Mirabito. Middle row, Jaya Whitehead, Emily Case, Maddison Blake, and Desiree Brown. Front row, Lilly Cunningham, Caden Paro, and Ellie Parkhurst. To perform on May 8 and May 9.
“Wall to Wall” Boys Hip Hop Group  Pictured left to right, back row, Nolan Miller, Damien Reidell, and Nathan Jackowski. Front, Keegan Bertrand, and Anthony Mills. Performing Friday and Saturday.
“Wall to Wall” Boys Hip Hop Group
Pictured left to right, back row, Nolan Miller, Damien Reidell, and Nathan Jackowski. Front, Keegan Bertrand, and Anthony Mills. Performing Friday and Saturday.
“Wall to Wall” Boys Hip Hop Group  Pictured left to right, Kiernan Percival, Patrick McInnis, and Dawson Krause.  Performing Friday and Saturday.
“Wall to Wall” Boys Hip Hop Group
Pictured left to right, Kiernan Percival, Patrick McInnis, and Dawson Krause. Performing Friday and Saturday.

 

“Mambo No. 5” Jazz Pictured left to right, back row, Tehya Madison, Hannah Bell, Tileya Penson, and Madison Papa.  Front row, Josephine Valenzuela, Alesana Congdon, Kelsey Draughn, and Madisyn Ames. This group will perform on Saturday, May 9 at 1 p.m.
“Mambo No. 5” Jazz
Pictured left to right, back row, Tehya Madison, Hannah Bell, Tileya Penson, and Madison Papa. Front row, Josephine Valenzuela, Alesana Congdon, Kelsey Draughn, and Madisyn Ames. This group will perform on Saturday, May 9 at 1 p.m.

 

“Check it Out” Beginner Hip Hop  Pictured left to right, back row, Alaina Vescio, Morgan Fischel, Izaac Mirabito, Niyah Humphrey, and Alesana Congdon, Front, Maverick Bonnell, and Karlee Vail. This group will be performing on Saturday, May 9 at 1 p.m.
“Check it Out” Beginner Hip Hop
Pictured left to right, back row, Alaina Vescio, Morgan Fischel, Izaac Mirabito, Niyah Humphrey, and Alesana Congdon, Front, Maverick Bonnell, and Karlee Vail. This group will be performing on Saturday, May 9 at 1 p.m.
“Mother Like Mine” Pictured left to right, back row, Avery Lawton, Lily Morrison, and Marissa Ditton.  Middle row, Alyssa Sawyer, Gianna Tucker, Isabella Rodriquez, and Allie Swick. Front row, Emma Perkins, Caitlin Scout, Zyah Demott, Gracie Battles, and Adelaide McEachen.  Performance on May 8 at 7 p.m. and May 9 at 1 p.m.
“Mother Like Mine”
Pictured left to right, back row, Avery Lawton, Lily Morrison, and Marissa Ditton. Middle row, Alyssa Sawyer, Gianna Tucker, Isabella Rodriquez, and Allie Swick. Front row, Emma Perkins, Caitlin Scout, Zyah Demott, Gracie Battles, and Adelaide McEachen. Performance on May 8 at 7 p.m. and May 9 at 1 p.m.
“There’s a Hero” Ballet Pictured left to right, back row, Cayley Cunningham, Mikaylee Vail, Aliana Vazquez, Annalee Mitchell, and Allison Mainville. Middle row, Avery Rodriguez, Alaina Vescio, Skyler Perkins, and Niyah Humphrey. Front row, Morgan Fischel, Jessa Ricker, Alivia Ruscitto, and Finley Nye.  To perform on Saturday, May 9.
“There’s a Hero” Ballet
Pictured left to right, back row, Cayley Cunningham, Mikaylee Vail, Aliana Vazquez, Annalee Mitchell, and Allison Mainville. Middle row, Avery Rodriguez, Alaina Vescio, Skyler Perkins, and Niyah Humphrey. Front row, Morgan Fischel, Jessa Ricker, Alivia Ruscitto, and Finley Nye. To perform on Saturday, May 9.
“G-Slide” Pictured left to right, back row, Elise Morse, Lily Morrison, Olivia Saunderson, Mallorie Smart, Lydia Gigliotti, and Isabella Rodriguez. Gianna Tucker, Lauren Bradshaw, Allie Swick, Eliana Occhino, and Avery Lawton.  Front row, Aiyana Kolb-Kee, Marissa Ditton, Chloe Bonoffski, Alyssa Sawyer, and Briana Ard.  This group will perform on May 8 and May 9.
“G-Slide”
Pictured left to right, back row, Elise Morse, Lily Morrison, Olivia Saunderson, Mallorie Smart, Lydia Gigliotti, and Isabella Rodriguez. Gianna Tucker, Lauren Bradshaw, Allie Swick, Eliana Occhino, and Avery Lawton. Front row, Aiyana Kolb-Kee, Marissa Ditton, Chloe Bonoffski, Alyssa Sawyer, and Briana Ard. This group will perform on May 8 and May 9.
“Say Hey” Jazz  Pictured left to right, back row, Alexa Bell, McKenna Lawson, Alexis Pettit, Lydia Gigliotti, Mallorie Smart, and Olivia Cunningham. Front row, Mia Knight, Elise Morse, Emma Fatcheric, Aiyana Kolb-Kee, Abby Mainville, and Olivia Saunderson.  Performances on May 8 at 7 p.m. and May 9 at 1 p.m.
“Say Hey” Jazz
Pictured left to right, back row, Alexa Bell, McKenna Lawson, Alexis Pettit, Lydia Gigliotti, Mallorie Smart, and Olivia Cunningham. Front row, Mia Knight, Elise Morse, Emma Fatcheric, Aiyana Kolb-Kee, Abby Mainville, and Olivia Saunderson. Performances on May 8 at 7 p.m. and May 9 at 1 p.m.
“International You Day” Lyrical  Pictured left to right, back row, Jaina Ricker, Anna-Carol Samson, Savanah France, Sydney Lawson, Chyanne Dillingham, and Madison Pepper.  Autumn Schneider, Gabriella Dibble, Samantha McRae, Katelyn Perkins, and Samantha Humphrey. This group will be performing on May 8 and May 9.
“International You Day” Lyrical
Pictured left to right, back row, Jaina Ricker, Anna-Carol Samson, Savanah France, Sydney Lawson, Chyanne Dillingham, and Madison Pepper. Autumn Schneider, Gabriella Dibble, Samantha McRae, Katelyn Perkins, and Samantha Humphrey. This group will be performing on May 8 and May 9.
“Every Breath You Take” Pointe Pictured left to right, Jaina Ricker, Vita Marie Dean, Dani Avery, and Kristen Skinner.  This group will perform on May 8 at 7 p.m. and May 9 at 1 p.m.
“Every Breath You Take” Pointe
Pictured left to right, Jaina Ricker, Vita Marie Dean, Dani Avery, and Kristen Skinner. This group will perform on May 8 at 7 p.m. and May 9 at 1 p.m.
“Glam” Jazz  Pictured left to right, back row, Taylor Bonoffski, Madison Kreinheder, Dani Avery, Sydney Lawson, and Jordan Jackowski. Front row, Shaylee Cealie, Rebecca Bailey, and Nevaeh Tucker. To perform on May 8 and May 9.
“Glam” Jazz
Pictured left to right, back row, Taylor Bonoffski, Madison Kreinheder, Dani Avery, Sydney Lawson, and Jordan Jackowski. Front row, Shaylee Cealie, Rebecca Bailey, and Nevaeh Tucker. To perform on May 8 and May 9.
“Timebomb” Jazz Pictured left to right, back row, Celeste Raponi, Gabriella Bailey, Dani Avery, and Lillian Bray.  Front row, Zoie Bowering, Rebecca Bailey, and Taylor Bonoffski. To perform on Friday and Saturday.
“Timebomb” Jazz
Pictured left to right, back row, Celeste Raponi, Gabriella Bailey, Dani Avery, and Lillian Bray. Front row, Zoie Bowering, Rebecca Bailey, and Taylor Bonoffski. To perform on Friday and Saturday.
“Don’t” Tap Pictured left to right, back row, Zoie Bowering, Celeste Raponi, and Gabriella Bailey. Front row, Cara Smith, Kristen Skinner, and Janelle Flack.
“Don’t” Tap
Pictured left to right, back row, Zoie Bowering, Celeste Raponi, and Gabriella Bailey. Front row, Cara Smith, Kristen Skinner, and Janelle Flack.
“Goin’ Down For Real” Advanced Hip Hop Group Pictured left to right, back row, Cara Smith, Janelle Flack, ShaLeigha Jackson, Rebecca Humphrey, and Celeste Raponi.  Front row, Dani Avery, Quinn Webb, Kendyl Lutz, and Alexis Kempston.
“Goin’ Down For Real” Advanced Hip Hop Group
Pictured left to right, back row, Cara Smith, Janelle Flack, ShaLeigha Jackson, Rebecca Humphrey, and Celeste Raponi. Front row, Dani Avery, Quinn Webb, Kendyl Lutz, and Alexis Kempston.
“Get Rhythm” Tap Pictured left to right, Alexis Kempston, Dani Avery, Quinn Webb, Rebecca Humphrey, and Kea Corey.
“Get Rhythm” Tap
Pictured left to right, Alexis Kempston, Dani Avery, Quinn Webb, Rebecca Humphrey, and Kea Corey.
“Latch” Jazz  Pictured left to right, back row, Rebecca Humphrey, Paige Kohler, Alexis Kempston, Kea Corey, and Quinn Webb.  Front row, Kendyl Lutz, and Morgan Sheffield.
“Latch” Jazz
Pictured left to right, back row, Rebecca Humphrey, Paige Kohler, Alexis Kempston, Kea Corey, and Quinn Webb. Front row, Kendyl Lutz, and Morgan Sheffield.

‘Live Local, Shop Local’ campaign kicks off Monday

Staff Report
This year’s “Live Local, Shop Local” campaign commences Monday, a market event with more than two dozen area businesses and organizations participating to share and promote the value of supporting local business and fostering growth in the local economy.
The eight-week campaign, sponsored by The Palladium-Times, Valley News and Pathfinder Bank, has evolved over the last five years, culminating last year and this year in a drawing for a $1,000 shopping spree for participating businesses.
According to The Palladium-Times and Valley News publisher Jon Spaulding, the well-known red shopping bag logo materializes into an actual shopping bag this week, which readers of Monday’s Palladium-Times and Wednesday’s Valley News can find inserted into the paper.
Readers are encouraged to bring the bags with them while shopping locally throughout the event; bags will also be available at participating businesses where shoppers can fill out contest entry blanks. The more they shop locally, the greater their chances of winning the shopping spree.
“With Pathfinder Bank partnering with both The Palladium-Times and Valley News in the effort this year, we have been able to expand the reach of the message on the importance of shopping locally throughout Oswego County,” said Spaulding.
“Like our customers, we live, work and play here,” said James Dowd, senior vice president and chief financial officer of Pathfinder Bank. “Our success is intertwined with the success of the communities we serve.”
Dowd said local businesses are a “vital part of our community’s distinct character.”
“When we shop locally, we help these businesses and they, in turn, make a positive impact on the place we call home,” Dowd said.
Greg Mills, executive director of the Greater Oswego-Fulton Chamber of Commerce, said the campaign draws attention to products and services “right under our own roof,” shortening shoppers’ drive times and boosting the local economy in the process.
“I’ve been guilty of it too, thinking I’ve got to go to the mall or Syracuse,” Mills said. “But the last three Christmases I’ve been able to do all my shopping without leaving Oswego.”
The campaign coincides with National Small Business Week, and Mills expected it to increase traffic at local stores, markets and restaurants.
Chris Sachel, of Mimi’s in Fulton, said the diner likes getting involved in efforts promoting local county businesses, saying the campaign would “absolutely” inspire visitors to shop and eat locally.
“I wanted to help out the community,” Sachel said of participating.
Spaulding said The Palladium-Times and Valley News, as the county’s primary local news sources, was “happy to spearhead such initiatives,” and he thanked Pathfinder Bank for its continued support of the campaign.
“We challenge ourselves and our business partners to consistently grow the message each year,” Spaulding said. “This year’s campaign is already a winner, because everyone wins when you support local business and our local economy.”