Category Archives: Other News

City bans tobacco at Fulton Farmers’ Market

 Fulton city officials, along with Greater Oswego-Fulton Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Greg Mills celebrate the Common Council’s recent action to ban smoking at the Fulton Farmers’ Market. Pictured from left are Second Ward Councilor Daniel Knopp, Third Ward Councilor Ryan Raponi, First Ward Councilor Tom Kenyon, Common Council President Larry Macner, Mayor Ron Woodward Sr., Mills, Fifth Ward Councilor Norman “Jay” Foster, and Fourth Ward Councilor Jim Myers. Photo provided

Fulton city officials, along with Greater Oswego-Fulton Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Greg Mills celebrate the Common Council’s recent action to ban smoking at the Fulton Farmers’ Market. Pictured from left are Second Ward Councilor Daniel Knopp, Third Ward Councilor Ryan Raponi, First Ward Councilor Tom Kenyon, Common Council President Larry Macner, Mayor Ron Woodward Sr., Mills, Fifth Ward Councilor Norman “Jay” Foster, and Fourth Ward Councilor Jim Myers.
Photo provided

By Matthew Reitz
The Fulton Common Council voted Tuesday to make the Fulton Farmers’ Market tobacco free beginning July 11.
The Tobacco Free Network of CNY, the Oswego County Health Department, and the Greater Oswego-Fulton Chamber of Commerce all supported the measure and encouraged city officials to pass the resolution, which prohibits the use of  all tobacco products inside the farmers’ market barriers, not just cigarettes. The Tobacco Free Network will provide signage to designate the boundaries of the smoke-free area at the farmers’ market.
The Common Council passed the resolution unanimously with little discussion on Tuesday, and Mayor Ron Woodward Sr. said he thought the move was a positive.
“I think it’s a good thing,” Woodward said.
The Tobacco Free Network of CNY says the move will make it safer for young children at the market as they are in danger not only of being burned by a cigarette or its ashes, but also from the negative health effects of secondhand smoke.
Danielle Hayden, assistant director of the Greater Oswego-Fulton Chamber of Commerce, said the farmer’s market aims to be a safe, family-oriented environment, and this measure will improve on that.
“It’s a family-friendly market,” Hayden said. “We wanted to make it’s smoke free for that fact alone.”
Greg Mills, the chamber’s executive director, said the tobacco-free policy will create a “safer, healthier environment for market vendors and patrons” and in turn a more family-friendly experience.
Hayden also mentioned that the Oswego Farmers’ Market has been smoke free “for a few years,” and it was only logical to follow their lead.
Jackie Thorpe, community specialist for the Tobacco Free Network of CNY, said she was pleased that Fulton voted to “protect its residents and the spirit of our farmers’ market.”
“There is no safe level of exposure to secondhand smoke,” Thorpe said. “Even if outdoors.”
Thorpe cited a 2010 study in which 91 percent of Oswego County residents considered secondhand smoke to be harmful, and another 75 percent of the county’s residents “favor restricting or completely eliminating cigarette smoking at public outdoor recreation areas or events.”
A 2013 ban on smoking in New York State Parks was also upheld by a state judge late last year.
Thorpe and the Tobacco Free Network provided an extensive list of reasons to go smoke-free that included preventing asthma, other respiratory diseases and cardiovascular disease.
The Fulton Farmers’ Market is located in the Canalview Park & Shop parking lot on S. Second Street on Saturdays through Oct. 13 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.

City sells off two former Nestlé parcels

By Matthew Reitz
Fulton officials agreed to sell two former Nestlé properties that were previously acquired through tax foreclosure on Tuesday night.
The properties were sold to Liverpool-based company Spring Storage Park, Inc. for a total of $100,000.
At its June 25 meeting, the Common Council had authorized Mayor Ron Woodward Sr. to execute the sale of three “nuisance properties,” but delayed a vote on the two Nestlé parcels due to concerns about the purchaser’s relationship with former Nestlé property owner Ed Palmer, from whom the tax-delinquent properties were acquired. The president of Spring Storage Park, Gary E. Spring, agreed to meet with councilors prior to the vote on Tuesday to alleviate any concerns they might have.
The council unanimously agreed to move forward with the sale following the meeting, but there was still hesitation among some councilors. First Ward Councilor Tom Kenyon said he was voting yes, but he was wary of the fact that Spring “used to be partners with Ed Palmer.” Kenyon said he feared the city would “get stuck” with the property again.
“This guy used to be partners with Ed Palmer who was up there before, and it scares me to death,” Kenyon said. “I’m afraid it’s going to come back to bite us again.”
The properties being sold are the former Building #30 on Fay Street, which Spring Storage Park has offered to purchase for $90,000, and an adjoining parcel with a parking lot on South Fourth Street that will be sold for $10,000.
Woodward said Spring shared his intent to use the properties as a warehouse and a U-Haul rental location. Woodward said the property sales were a positive, and would help the city move forward. Woodward previously told the council that, in addition to putting the properties back on the tax rolls, the sale would take care of the taxes owed on those parcels.
“We need to get these properties back on the tax role,” Woodward said. He added that it was “a good thing” to have someone utilizing any Nestlé buildings that are still usable.
Fourth Ward Councilor Jim Myers said the sale was the “start of a positive” to transform the former Nestlé properties from vacant buildings to something useful.
“I’m glad to see the sale of Building #30 and the parking lot go through,” Myers said. “I hope we can proceed with the Aldi’s, but it’s a start.”

Cordone: FCSD will explore all options for enrollment concerns

By Colin Hogan
Members of the Fulton City School District Board of Education say they want to explore all possible options for addressing enrollment disparity among the district’s four elementary schools as they proceed with a study on the matter this coming school year.
The board recently authorized a study into possible solutions to an imbalance among enrollment numbers in the elementary schools, which will be conducted during the 2015-16 school year.  The study will examine whether the district would benefit from a realignment of those buildings’ grade level configurations, along with other alternatives that might be prudent in helping balance out enrollment across the schools.
“We have a parameter in the district that we keep class sizes at 25 students or less. We don’t exceed 25, and younger grades we prefer to keep even lower than that if we can,” explained Superintendent Bill Lynch.
Based on anticipated enrollment figures at each school, the district could have a challenge keeping all elementary class sizes within its benchmark.
School officials say they’re interested in finding out if by consolidating grade levels among sister schools (schools that are on the same side of the river) through a realignment, they could reliably balance out those class sizes. They say, theoretically, each side of the river could have one elementary school that houses grades K-3, and one that houses grades 4-6, rather than having four separate K-6 facilities.
For example, district officials anticipate that Granby Elementary, which currently has three fourth-grade sections, will have about 80 students enrolled in that grade during the 2015-16 school year, causing those class sizes to exceed 25 students. Yet, its sister school, Lanigan Elementary, is expected to only have about 57 students spread among its three sections. If those six fourth-grade sections were consolidated to one building, class sizes could stay below the 25-student benchmark (23-24 students per class).
David Cordone, president of the school board, said he and other board members are eager to find a solution to enrollment disparity and the staffing issues it may cause, but want to be sure all options — not just a realignment  — are explored before setting a course of action.
“We recognized that (a realignment) is one of the options that could be looked at, but is it the only option?” Cordone said.
Cordone said the board wants to thoroughly explore the concept, both in how it would work for the district and how the community at large would respond, before moving forward with any changes.
“If such a change is going to impact four buildings, there are going to be staff and students in each of those buildings impacted,” Cordone said. “We need to make sure we really know what all that is going to entail.”
One possible alternative to a realignment that Cordone mentioned would be to redraw the catchment areas (i.e. the boundaries that outline which households are assigned to a particular school) in a way that would balance enrollment numbers.
One of Cordone’s concerns with realignment, he said, is that it adds another school-to-school transition as students progress through grades K-12. He said research shows that students benefit from having fewer of those transitions during their time in school.
Cordone said details on how the study will be conducted still need to be worked out, but noted that the district would be working closely with parents, faculty/staff and community members through the process.

Joe Magnarelli and Akiko Tsuruga to headline Fulton Jazz Fest

Syracuse native and jazz trumpeter Joe Magnarelli, with his wife, Akiko Tsuruga “Queen of the Organ,” headline the 2015 Fulton Jazz Fest, 5-11:30 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 7 and 4-11 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 8, it was announced by co-chairs Joe Cortini and Bill Hubel. The event is on the shores of Lake Neatahwanta, behind the Fulton War Memorial on state Route 3 and admission is free.  Photos provided
Syracuse native and jazz trumpeter Joe Magnarelli, with his wife, Akiko Tsuruga “Queen of the Organ,” headline the 2015 Fulton Jazz Fest, 5-11:30 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 7 and 4-11 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 8, it was announced by co-chairs Joe Cortini and Bill Hubel. The event is on the shores of Lake Neatahwanta, behind the Fulton War Memorial on state Route 3 and admission is free.
Photos provided

AkikoTsurugaSyracuse native and jazz trumpeter Joe Magnarelli, with his wife, Akiko Tsuruga “Queen of the Organ,” headline the 2015 Fulton Jazz Fest, 5-11:30 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 7 and 4-11 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 8, it was announced by co-chairs Joe Cortini and Bill Hubel.
The event is on the shores of Lake Neatahwanta, behind the Fulton War Memorial on state Route 3 and admission is free.
“It’s extremely exciting to have both Joe Magnarelli and Akiko Tsuruga headline together,” Cortini said. “They have toured the world and are icons on both the New York and international jazz scenes. This is a true bop-meets-B3 matchup that will be over the top!”
The festival kicks off this year with Happy Hour from 5-6 p.m. on Friday, when vocalist Nancy Kelly will take the Fulton Savings Bank stage. Kelly has been a prominent figure in the success of the event, performing at two past Fulton Jazz Fests. Following Happy Hour, The Longwood Jazz Project will play from 6:30-8 p.m. Back by popular demand is Classified, featuring high-energy brass, keyboards and vocals from 8:30-11 p.m, Cortini said.
“Classified shares its roots with classic brass groups Eric & the Chessmen and Ascension from the ‘60s and ‘70s.”
The fun continues on Saturday at 4 p.m. with E.S.P. featuring Melissa Gardiner, “rising star of trombone.” According to their website, “E.S.P. gives yesterday’s bebop a tasteful modern touch by blending their traditional jazz roots with great improvisation.” Gardiner, featured in the February 2015 issue of International Musician, is a jazz trombone instructor at Cornell and Syracuse universities. She performs regularly with her jazz organ trio and has released the album, “Transitions.”  Joe Magnarelli and Akiko Tsuruga will follow E.S.P. at 6 p.m. Rounding out the evening will be a performance by the mass brass of Atlas, a Fulton Jazz Fest favorite, from 8-11 p.m.
Headliner Joe Magnarelli, (aka “Mags”), has built a huge body of work as both a leader and a sideman with some of the world’s greatest bands. According to his website, (joemagnarelli.com), he toured and recorded with Lionel Hampton, Jack McDuff, Toshiko Akioshi, the Glenn Miller Orchestra, Harry Connick Jr., John Pizzarelli, Aretha Franklin, Rosemary Clooney, Joe Williams, Michael Feinstein, the Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center orchestras, and many more. He has nine records out as a leader, and in 1990, he was a semifinalist at the Thelonious Monk International Trumpet Competition in Washington, D.C. He is currently an adjunct professor of music at the Juilliard School of Music and Rutgers University.
Akiko Tsuruga, according to akikotsuruga.com, began playing the organ at age 3 and is a graduate of Japan’s Osaka College of Music. Lou Donaldson proclaimed her “Queen of the Organ.” She established herself in the NYC mecca of jazz since she arrived there in 2001 and has played regularly with Donaldson’s quartet in both the U.S. and Europe. She has headlined at the Blue Note, Smalls, the Green Mill in Chicago, Yoshi’s in Oakland, Calif., and Pine Grill Reunion in Buffalo. She has released five albums in Japan and four in the U.S. Both of her first two U.S. releases, “Sweet and Funky,” and “Oriental Express,” have ranked within the top 20 on national jazz radio charts. Upon releasing her new album, “Commencement,” she changed her name to simply AKIKO.
Gates open at 4 p.m. and admission is free, made possible through sponsorship from local businesses, including stage sponsor Fulton Savings Bank and major sponsors Chirello Advertising, Davis-Standard, Mimi’s Drive-In, Oswego Health, SUNY Oswego/SBDC, Community Bank and PathFinder Bank. The festival has also received promotional support from the Greater Oswego-Fulton Chamber of Commerce and the Oswego County Department of Tourism, as well as several other sponsors.
A variety of refreshments will be sold, and beer and wine is available to purchase with valid ID at the Blue Moon Grill stand, as well as Blue Moon’s New Orleans Cajun cuisine.
Please bring your lawn chairs or blankets, but leave your coolers and pets at home, Hubel said. For more information, find the event on Facebook under “Fulton Jazz Festival”.

New owner to transform former Nestlé Park

The former Nestlé Park in Volney will now be operating as Virgilio’s Event Centre, a private venue for events, after it was sold to its current owner, Virgil Dombroski, last year.  Matthew Reitz photo
The former Nestlé Park in Volney will now be operating as Virgilio’s Event Centre, a private venue for events, after it was sold to its current owner, Virgil Dombroski, last year.
Matthew Reitz photo

By Matthew Reitz
The old Nestlé Park just south of Fulton will soon be in operation as Virgilio’s Event Centre, the owner recently told officials in the Town of Volney.
The 69-acre property on 52 Nestlé Drive was sold by Nestlé in 2003, and sold again late last year to the current owner, Virgil Dombroski. Dombroski says he is revamping the facility and plans to hold weddings, company picnics and other events at the venue.
“We’re looking to basically be a one-stop shop for everything,” Dombroski said. “We will have our own catering license and our own liquor license there.”
Dombroski said several people have expressed excitement to him about the renovations to the iconic park, and shared their memories of the site.
“People love that place,” Dombroski said.
Dombroksi, who also owns a party rental company in Syracuse, said the acquisition of a venue to host events was a logical next step.
“I have the resources to promote it because we already do the entertainment and wedding stuff,” Dombroski said. “We have the resources to promote it, to book it and to sell it.”
The venue is named after Dombroksi’s youngest son and features a 6,000-square-foot banquet hall with a full kitchen. Dombroksi said the existing basketball and tennis courts will be entirely redone, as well as a baseball field.
“We will have a full-size tennis court, a full-size basketball court with two hoops, and we are redoing the brand new baseball field with a 40-foot backstop — all brand new, we are gutting out everything,” Dombroski said.
There will also be a volleyball court and two brand new horse shoe pits with “sand and proper drainage,” he said.
The bathrooms are being renovated to feature a “Victorian chic” style women’s room and a “straight-up man cave”-style men’s room, he said.
Wedding ceremonies can be held at a private waterway at the site.
“It’s an inlet off the Oswego River, but it’s totally private,” Dombroski said.
Dombroski said he already has a couple weddings and company picnics booked, and would be opening as soon as he got approval from the fire marshal and a certificate of occupancy from the Town of Volney.
Dombroski is seeking to be added to the exemption list from a mass gathering law being considered in the Town of Volney. He said they would like to do car shows, chili and chicken wing festivals, and maybe even a summer concert series in the future if the town will allow it.
“We want to do those things down the road,” Dombroski said. “I want to bring it back to its heyday when it was Nestlé’s.”

Pathfinder Courts upgrade to break ground this fall

By Colin Hogan
The estimated $24 million upgrade to the Pathfinder Courts apartment facilities is slated to break ground in September, officials said Thursday.
The project, which comes with the privatization of the former public housing facilities to a not-for-profit model, is expected to take 24-28 months to complete once it begins.
The Pathfinder Courts apartments, which currently include 60 low-income family units and a 50-unit senior housing complex, were established as state-sponsored public housing in the late 1960s and early ’70s under the Fulton Housing Authority. However, as state funding for local housing authorities has diminished over the years, leaving only the rental revenues to sustain the properties, FHA has struggled to make capital improvements to the aging facilities.
As FHA now approaches the end of those buildings’ 50-year mortgages, it is turning them over to a new not-for-profit entity — Emery Street Housing Development Fund Company, consisting of the same staff and administration who currently run the facilities — which will be investing millions of dollars to upgrade the sites and continue to run them under a low-income housing model.
With Pathfinder Courts privatizing to a not-for-profit model, the City of Fulton will no longer be obligated to make it whole if it can’t meet its financial obligations. As a public housing facility, the city was required to do so.
As the transition continues to move forward, officials are planning major upgrades to the buildings to the tune of $16 million. Those include new facades, repairing hazardous sidewalks, fixing drainage issues, providing outdoor lighting that meets safety guidelines, a new security system, upgraded fire alarm systems, better electrical service to buildings, new roofs and siding, better insulation, updated kitchen and bathrooms, and new furnaces and water heaters. The project will also do away with any asbestos-based materials within the facilities.
When adding in the cost of relocating residents for the construction period, asbestos removal, legal and bank fees, and other miscellaneous costs, officials estimated about $24 million would be spent on the endeavor.
However, officials said Pathfinder Courts will probably only end up borrowing about $1.5 million of that. The rest of the funds are being pooled together from several state and federal resources.
Holly Carpenter of the Fulton Housing Authority said Thursday that all of the expected funding has come through and is currently being finalized.
“All the funding has come through, it’s just a matter of the lawyers crossing the Ts and dotting the Is,” Carpenter said.
Carpenter said the deal is now expected to close sometime in August, and a groundbreaking ceremony is slated for September.

Hannibal town planning officials deny permit for gravel mine

By Matthew Reitz
The Town of Hannibal Planning Board voted to reject the site plan for a gravel mine on Harris Hill Road last week, drawing applause from residents attending the meeting.
Last month, the board closed a heavily attended public hearing that many residents used to express concerns about safety, wear and tear on town roads and the effects of mining on the town. A DEC permit was issued to CJ Ferlito Aggregates for the site, to which town planning officials could have added stipulations. However, after much discussion they delayed a vote at the June meeting and rejected the application for a special use permit last week.
Planning Board Chairman Robert Dilts said the board had 62 days to act from the closing of the public hearing. He said the August 6 meeting would have been beyond that period of time, and told the board “if we kick it down the road again it automatically takes place on August 4, and to my understanding we no longer have any control or input on the matter.”
After the board unanimously agreed to vote on the matter, board member Gregory Stupps Sr. made a motion to reject the site plan.
“I’d like to make a motion that the site plan gets rejected,” Stupps said.
Dilts asked Stupp to “clarify on what basis,” to which Stupp replied it was “an unsafe entrance on to Harris Hill Road” and “for the community, it doesn’t coincide with the zoning code of the Town of Hannibal.”
Ellen Killicut seconded Stupps’ motion, and board member Joshua Bomgren mentioned that the mine also was against the town’s comprehensive plan in “keeping the town a rural community.”
“It would have a detrimental effect on the neighborhood,” board member Dawn Combes said.
Killicut echoed Combes’ sentiment and said the mine would be “a detriment to the people that live on that road as they have come forward and said.”
“It’s a safety issue with large trucks on such a narrow road,” Susan De May said.
The board voted 5-2 to reject the site plan “because of the unsafe entrance and because the mine does not agree with the zoning code.” Dilts and Anthony Murabito were the two dissenting votes.
“The application for a special permit is rejected, and we deny the mine,” Dilts said.
The planning board also approved a “minor subdivision” for a property owned by Leonard Fowler on county Route 7, about 1 mile north of county Route 3. The property was split by county Route 7 and already contained a home on each side of the road. A very quiet public comment period preceded the board’s unanimous approval.

Friends of Fulton Parks Medallion Hunt and Stones Search

Medallion Hunt Clue #2

Ducks and fish swim in this park, but people no longer do.

Go for the fences… not over them.

Stones Search Clues: Saturday 6/27

Find these stones: These stones will be hidden in a different park each day. A clue will be given daily at valleynewsonline.com. Go to that park and find the stone for that day. Try to collect a stone from each of the 10 parks. Each collection will be awarded a playground prize. (One per household)
Find these stones: These stones will be hidden in a different park each day. A clue will be given daily at valleynewsonline.com. Go to that park and find the stone for that day. Try to collect a stone from each of the 10 parks. Each collection will be awarded a playground prize. (One per household)

In 2014, the challenge was to find the park when given its name. This year, a park fact will give you the clue to the location of the stones of the day.

Find today’s stones in these parks:

1) This park has the same name as a President of the United States, and is named after his Fulton cousin.

2) This park is near a former swimming beach at Sharp’s Pond.

 3) This park once had a dance pavilion and carousel.