Category Archives: Other News

News in Brief

As of April 30, 2014, The Valley News will only accept classified advertisements for the Wednesday and Saturday print editions.

We will no longer publish classifieds online. To submit a classified ad, call us at 598-6397 or visit our office at 67 S. Second St., Fulton.

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The Class of 1990 from G. Ray Bodley High School 25th Reunion Planning Meeting at 7 p.m. Saturday, April 12 at Lakeview Lanes Bar area.

All are welcome to attend.

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The H. Lee White Maritime Museum is hosting the second history lecture of the 2014 series at 1:30 p.m. Saturday, April 12.

The topic will be “Battle Island, July 3, 1756: Ambush on the Oswego River.” Presented by historian Steve Wapen. The program will be held at the museum and is open to the public.

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Sterling Nature Center is having an egg dyeing event at 1 p.m. April 12.

See what colors you can get from your pantry just in time for the spring table. Go back to nature with this fun and entertaining program using natural dyes to color your eggs. Please bring your own hard-boiled eggs to dye. An adult should accompany children.

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The West Monroe Volunteer Fire Department will be having a pancake breakfast at its fire station form 8 a.m. to noon on Palm Sunday, April 13.

The menu for the breakfast will consist of pancakes, French toast, sausage, ham, eggs cooked to order, toast, tomato or orange juice, coffee, tea, hot cocoa or milk.

The West Monroe Fire Station is located on County Route 11 two-tenths of a mile north of State Route 49 in West Monroe, and can be found on the Web at
westmonroefire.org.

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The state Department of Transportation announced a number of road projects that are beginning this spring.

Two are in Oswego County. They are:

1) Route 481 over Bonstead Road and the Oneida River. The northbound and southbound bridges will receive minor rehabilitations. Work elements include pier and abutment concrete repairs, new approach slabs, new joints and thin epoxy deck overlays.

The project work will be staged, with one lane in each direction available at all times. The bridges are located on the border between Onondaga and Oswego counties.

2) Route 3 over the Oswego River (the Broadway bridge in Fulton). The last major portion of work on this project in the city of Fulton will take place during the first half of this construction season.

The new westbound bridge deck will be formed and poured, allowing for the sidewalk, rail and lighting installations.  The new bridge should be fully open to traffic and pedestrians in mid-summer.

In the meantime, one lane of traffic in each direction will be available.

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Fulton author Jim Farfaglia will be talking about his book on muck farming at two upcoming events.

The Oswego Town Historical Society will host him at its April meeting at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday April 16 at the Oswego Town Hall, 2320 County Route 7.

He also will speak at 2 p.m. Sunday April 27 at the Volney town hall in Volney Center.

Farfaglia’s book, “OF THE EARTH,” includes interviews with muck farmers in Oswego County and explains the importance of muck farming on the area.

Both events are open to the public.

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The Granby Seniors and Friends is sponsoring a trip to Cape Cod May 19 through 23.

A meeting about the trip is scheduled for noon April 17 at the Granby Community Center. For more information, call Joann at 564-5797 or Fran at 343-2381.

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For the past 15 years, Oswego’s faithful have gathered in St. Joseph’s Church each Friday in Lent to attend the 11:30 a.m. Stations of the Cross and to participate in the 12:10 p.m. Mass.

The event offers a free luncheon in the parish center. Donations from Canale’s Restaurant, Greene’s Ale House, and Vona’s Restaurant, as well as contributions from those in attendance, create a tasty and varied menu.

Soup, sandwiches, pizza, and salad are offered, as well as beverages provided by St. Joseph’s Church.

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Pathfinder Rod and Gun Club and the National Wild Turkey Federation will host the annual Turkey Jamboree for Kids ages 9 to 16 on April 19 at the club.

From 9 to 11:30 a.m., those age 9 through 11 will attend. From noon to 3 p.m., those age 12 to 16 will attend.

There will be a virtual turkey hunt, weather permitting. Be sure to dress for outside activity.

This event is offered free to all boys and girls. For more information, call Tom at 343-4734 or LouAnn at 409-6566.

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The town Of Granby is once again planning a town of Granby Family Fun  Day to be held this summer from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.  June 21.

Included in the festivities will be the recognition of a Granby citizen of the year. The town is seeking nominations from the public to receive this honor.

If you would like to nominate a deserving person or couple from the town of Granby for this tribute, send a letter of recommendation by April 30 to Granby Town Clerk, 820 County Route 8, Fulton, NY 13069.

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Lakeside Christian Ministries, a new faith-based ministry organization in the Fulton area, is hosting an Easter Sunday service at 9:30 a.m. April 20 in the community room at the Fulton Municipal Building on South First Street.

The service is open to all. There will be light refreshments, a mix of traditional and modern music, and an uplifting message.

Longtime Fulton resident Chuck Copps, one of the organizers of Lakeside Christian Ministries, is finishing up his course work this year through Rockbridge Seminary.

“As the end of my studies draws near, the time has come to put my learning into practice and serve those in need in the greater Fulton area,” he said.

Founded by Chuck, his wife, Betsy, and Jerry and Bridgette Seguin, Lakeside Christian Ministries has a mission of living as Jesus lived, loving as Jesus loved and serving as Jesus served so God may be glorified and those in need may be helped.

Lakeside Christian Ministries recently began holding weekly worship services in members’ homes on Sunday evenings. They also gather during the week to pray, share meals and strengthen their relationships with other people and with God.

Lakeside Christian Ministries has a Facebook page, LakesideCMFulton. To contact Lakeside Christian Ministries, call 806-9815 or email lakeside4jesus@gmail.com.

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A harmonica club in Fulton is looking for new mmbers.

Players can be of any ability.

If interested, call Keith Baker at 592-5608.

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The Hannibal Fire Company Auxiliary is having its breakfast buffet from 8 to 11 a.m., Sunday April 27 at the Hannibal Fire House, Oswego Street, Hannibal.

This is the last breakfast until September.

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Noah’s Christian Nursery School will be holding its spring Open House from 6 to 7:45 p.m. Thursday, May 1.

Those attending the event will have an opportunity to visit the classroom, meet the preschool teachers and tour the facilities.

Noah’s Christian Nursery School is located at 1408 State Route 176, within the Fulton First United Methodist Church. This is a non-denominational preschool, which focuses on both the spiritual and educational needs of our children. The school has morning and afternoon classes for three-year-olds and four-year-olds.

For further information, call Sheila Simpson at 592-7347 or 593-3863 (after 3 p.m.)

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Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oswego County is hosting a Quilt in a Day demonstration Saturday, May 10.

Patricia Knoechel, Quilt in a Day Representative, will give a demonstration on the company’s newest publication, Mystery Quilt, and Eleanor Burns’ signature patterns: Honeycomb, Christmas Tree and Wreath, Chimneys and Cornerstones. Double Four Patch, Geese in the garden, Pineapple and Nouveau Wedding Ring,

This program will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Believers Chapel, Route 3 South, Mexico. There is a $5 class fee.

For more information or to register for this workshop, call the Cornell Cooperative Extension Office of Oswego County at 963-7286, ext. 302 by Wednesday, May 7.

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The Sterling Nature Center is having a Migratory Dragonfly Short Course from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 25.

This course is intended for anyone interested in dragonflies and in contributing to our growing knowledge about dragonfly migration in North America.

Whether you are a novice or a pro when it comes to dragonflies, join us for this fun and informative event to become a volunteer dragonfly monitor and help us explore the amazing but understudied phenomenon of dragonfly migration.

Go to events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07e93pfn6of558033d&llr=tnjebhdab for more information and to register.

Space is limited and pre-registration is required.

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The Holy Week services have been announced for the Pennellville United Methodist Church, 389 County Route 54, Pennellville:

Palm Sunday, 11 a.m. Sunday, April 13.

Good Friday, 7 p.m. Friday April 18.

Easter, Sunday April 20, SUNRISE/SONRISE SERVICE, 8 a.m.; breakfast 8:30 a.m. with free will offering, Easter egg hunt and crafts, 9:30 a.m., Easter worship service, 11 a.m.

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Looking for information related to projects, educational opportunities and public events related to invasive species?

Look no further! The partners of the St. Lawrence Eastern Lake Ontario Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management (SLELO PRISM), are live on the Internet to help anyone access information about invasive species activities in the eastern Lake Ontario, Tug Hill and St. Lawrence region.

The website also hosts an interactive resource directory for local contacts in your area. Visit the website at sleloinvasives.org for local invasive species information and events.

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The Montezuma Audubon Center’s eighth annual Wildlife Festival from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, May 3 will celebrate Important Bird Areas with activities for all ages.

Games, crafts, music and theatrical performances at the Children’s Theater and Activity Areas will entertain at this year’s festival.

The Montezuma Audubon Center is located at 2295 State Route 89, Savannah.

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The Oswego County Autism Task Force  is participating in the local high school scholarship programs for 2014 graduating seniors planning post-secondary education or vocational school this fall.

The task force is offering the Brianna Cahill Scholarship to qualifying seniors. The scholarship is $2,000 in total scholarship money to a student or several students of Oswego County’s nine public high schools based on the following criteria:

Our application must be completed by the student

The recipient must be accepted to a post-secondary or vocational school.

The recipient must be currently diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Applications must be received by the Oswego County Autism Task Force by May 1 for final review and selection by our committee.

Our final selection will be announced to the school by May 25.

For more information, call Tammy Thompson, task force vice president, at 349-3510.

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State Sen. Patricia Ritchie is accepting nominations for her “Golden Apple” Award for Teaching Excellence, an honor designed to recognize teachers who go above and beyond to help students succeed.

Last year, Ritchie honored more than 40 educators from Oswego, Jefferson and St. Lawrence Counties for their dedication and commitment to education.

Teachers in Oswego, Jefferson and St. Lawrence Counties are eligible for nomination. Nomination forms can be found on Ritchie’s website, ritchie.nysenate.gov, or those interested in suggesting an individual for the award may call  782-3418 to have a form mailed to them.

Nomination forms must be received by May 9. All nominees will be recognized at a special event May 30.

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The 43rd Annual Spring Tree and Shrub Program through Oswego County Soil & Water Conservation District is underway.

The Oswego County Soil and Water Conservation District is offering the following species this year.

DECIDUOUS TREES: Plane tree sycamore, black cherry, Flame Maple, thornless honey locust, old fashion Lilac, red maple, red oak, river birch, sawtooth oak, sugar maple, tulip poplar and white oak.

GROUND COVER: blue lyme grass.

EVERGREENS: Austrian pine, balsam fir, black hills spruce, Fraser fir, Canadian hemlock, majestic blue spruce, and white pine.

FRUITS: Blueberry Bushes: bluecrop and blueray; red raspberries: heritage; strawberries: eclair and Fort Laramie; also offering Bag O’blooms – Strawberry kit.

PERENNIALS: Astilbes glow and bumalda, black eyed susans, daylilies: bellaboo and purple de oro, hostas: patriot and variegated mix, rhododendrons dark purple & pink.

SHRUBS: Arborvitae danica globe and green giant, forsythia lynwood gold, viburnum highbush cranberry.

MISCELLANEOUS CONSERVATION ITEMS: arbor guards, bat boxes, bluebird nesting boxes, wood duck boxes, fertilizer tablets, organic compost tea bags – plant nutrition, organic tree fertilizer spikes, marking flags, mill liqua gel, rain gauges, stump-out decomposes naturally, weedguard plus paper.

To obtain an order form, contact the Oswego County Soil and Water District at 592-9663. The form can also be printed directly from the web at oswegosoilandwater.com or stop by our office at 3105 State Route 3, Fulton.

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The Sunshine Community & Child Care Center in Fulton is putting on its Summer Gratitude Gala 2014 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, June 14.

Vendors, activities, tie-dye, arts and crafts, parking lot sale, food, music and nonalcoholic beverages will be available.

There also will be a cutest pet contest, bounce houses and a cutest prince and princess contest.

Vendor registration packets available at Sunshine Center at 561-7861.

“Bundle of Bucks” fundraiser set for May 31

Port City Chiropractic, P.C. is helping line up support for this year’s St. Luke “Bundle of Bucks” Charity Drawing  event.

Dr. Ed Galvin, Jr. at Port City Chiropractic has donated a Chiroflow Premium Watebase pillow, one of the many valuable prizes to be awarded during the drawing party May 31 at the Oswego Elks Lodge.

In addition to door prizes, the “Bundle of Bucks” event will award 15 cash prizes totaling $25,000, with a top prize of $10,000 to a lucky winner when all 1,000 tickets are sold.

Every ticket purchased will be entered in all 15 cash prize drawings.

The entry fee for the drawing is $50 per ticket. Ticket applications are available by calling St. Luke Health Services at 342-3166, or you can stop and purchase tickets directly at St. Luke Health Services, Bishop’s Commons or St. Francis Commons in Oswego, and Michaud Residential Health Services in Fulton.

Ticket applications are also available online at www.stlukehs.com.

Proceeds from the “Bundle of Bucks” go to the St. Luke–John Foster Burden Fund, directly supporting resident programs at the nonprofit affiliate organizations of The St. Luke Family of Caring; St. Luke Health Services, Bishop’s Commons Enriched Living Residence and St. Francis Commons Assisted Living Residence in Oswego, and Michaud Residential Health Services in Fulton.

Each ticket admits two adults to the “Bundle of Bucks” drawing party from 1 to 4 p.m. May 31 at the Elks Lodge in Oswego. The event features free food, beverages, live entertainment, games and prize drawings.

You must be 18 years or older to purchase a drawing ticket and you do not have to be present at the drawing to win.

For more information call 342-3166.

Granby students persevere

Elizabeth Chrisman and Riley Lunn were among the students selected by their teachers for their exemplary behavior and representation of the month’s behavioral expectation: perseverance. The students selected were treated to a special breakfast with Principal Heather Perry (middle).
Elizabeth Chrisman and Riley Lunn were among the students selected by their teachers for their exemplary behavior and representation of the month’s behavioral expectation: perseverance. The students selected were treated to a special breakfast with Principal Heather Perry (middle).

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

March’s character education trait in the Fulton City School District was perseverance.

Students at Granby Elementary School selected at best representing that character trait were treated to a special breakfast with Principal Heather Perry.

Over a meal of breakfast pizza, fruit cups, cereal and juice, Perry asked students if they could define perseverance.

One student described perseverance as facing many obstacles, but never giving up.

The following students were honored with the breakfast and each received a special certificate: Angelina Ferro, Jadriel Baez, Allison Treneer, Lucian Perkins, Avery Nunez, James Carden, Natalie Mcrae, Lily Mccoy, Zachary Brown, Mylea Calabro, Hannay Mackey, Jeffery Landers, Lyle Cole, Junior Gomez, Hailey Payment, Brielle Sievers, Miguel Sanderson, Daniel Demott-Smith, Savanna Flynn, Dylan Sullivan, Madison McCarty-Castillo, Gabby Farnham, Preston Collett, Nathaniel Sivalia, Adrienne Santos, Skylar Blake, Nicholas Smith, Kaylee Holmes, Elise Morse, Aiden Trude, Adyson Shepard, Jasmine Clew, Donald Gates, Ethan Bardin, Cameron Brown, Aiyanna Kolb-Kee, Rose Mills, Reese Calkins, Nick Mariotti, Riley Lunn, Walter Crofoot, Rebecca Stone, Elizabeth Chrisman, Chloe Bonoffski, Jillian Crandall, Sean Hein, Dominic Berry, Leah Mansfield, Hannah Rice, Montanna Gardinier, Chelsea Redman, Morgan Schuyler, Makayla Nolin and Conner Schneider.

Learn to paint silk scarves

Cindy Schmidt demonstrating the techniques used for Hand Painted Silk Scarves.
Cindy Schmidt demonstrating the techniques used for Hand Painted Silk Scarves.

Anyone who has ever wanted to learn how to make hand-painted silk scarves should take an upcoming class at Lakeside Artisans, 191 W. First St., Oswego.

The class will be held from 10 a.m. to noon, Saturday, April 29.

Cindy Schmidt will show how to use the resist and dye method to decorate a silk scarf. Each participant will produce a scarf of their own design. All materials will be provided. There is a class limit of 6 participants.

This is another in the series of educational experiences for adults put on by Lakeside Artisans.

To register for a class, a non-refundable registration fee of $10 is required. The deposit may be delivered to the store or mailed to Lakeside Artisans, 191 W. First St., Oswego NY 13126.

The total class fee is $45, which includes the registration fee.

For additional information, call 342-8880, go to lakesideartisans.com  or visit Lakeside Artisans us on Facebook.

Entrepreneur SUNY Oswego’s honors convocation speaker

Tracy Higginbotham
Tracy Higginbotham

Submitted by SUNY Oswego

Living her passion every day fuels Tracy Chamberlain Higginbotham, a 1986 SUNY Oswego graduate who will be the featured speaker at the college’s Honors Convocation.

The ceremony will begin at 3 p.m. April 11 in the Campus Center’s arena and convocation hall.

When Higginbotham addresses the 115 honors recipients and their supporters that Friday, she will speak about her own experiences, and she will encourage audience members, no matter what their goals, majors or ages, to find the nexus of their personal and corporate passions.

“I believe that we are most fulfilled, and our contributions to society are most effective, when we work in a profession that fits that overriding passion,” Higginbotham says.

Founder and president of Women TIES (Women Together Inspiring Entrepreneurial Success), Higginbotham helps female small business owners expand their economic opportunities by connecting with and supporting one another.

The group serves 300 members with 60 volunteers in six regional districts of New York state.

“My corporate mission is the same as my personal mission,” she says. “I have been constant in my beliefs and in my advocacy for women entrepreneurs.”

As a small business owner herself for 15 years — she founded an events management company, Five Star Events, in 1995 — Higginbotham knows firsthand the needs of her colleagues.

By 2005, she says, she embraced her passion for helping other women entrepreneurs and created her second company, Women TIES, to foster larger and stronger economic networks among women across the state.

Role models

Higginbotham, eldest of eight siblings, says her advocacy for women stems from her early observations of successful women who were close to her. Her mother and an aunt were both small business owners, and a 1931 SUNY Oswego alumna, the late Olive Brannan Spargo, served as an important mentor to Higginbotham in her late teens.

“I had such strong women to guide me that I developed love and respect for women who are engaged in interesting ventures,” Higginbotham says. “My mother and aunt were each in business in the 1960s, a time when women were just emerging in such roles.”

Spargo, who had been a public school teacher and active Oswego volunteer, lived in Rome, Oneida County, where Higginbotham grew up.

“She tapped me on the shoulder when I was 16 to take a leadership role greeting potential SUNY Oswego students in our hometown, and she was a great influence on me from that time on,” Higginbotham said.

Spargo was instrumental in bringing Higginbotham back to the SUNY Oswego family after she graduated to work for the Alumni Relations Office and in encouraging her to serve as one of the youngest members of the Oswego Alumni Association board of directors.

“Women have helped me,” Higginbotham says. “They have been inspirational and practical in their assistance. It is my intention to carry this help forward.”

Her professional success in small business and leadership has been recognized extensively, including two awards, in 2005 and 2011, from the New York State Small Business Administration.

Amid her busy professional life, she still makes her affiliation with SUNY Oswego a priority.

“I wanted to be involved in everything at SUNY Oswego from the moment I got there,” says Higginbotham, who lives with her husband and two sons in Central New York.

“It’s natural for people to love their alma maters, but I am impressed that Oswego had so much to offer. I’ll always be grateful for my education there and for the people I’ve met along the way.”

Higginbotham graduated from SUNY Oswego with a bachelor’s degree in business administration.

She continued with graduate studies in business management and now serves on the advisory board of Oswego’s School of Business in addition to several other board memberships in Central New York.

Deadline May 3 to register for MASH Camp

Learning how to suture at last year’s Oswego Hospital MASH Camp was Megan Lagoe, of Oswego. Offering his expertise is Oswego Hospital Surgeon Aleksandr Sokolovsky, D.O. The goal of the two-day camp is to introduce healthcare careers to students entering eighth and ninth grades. The application deadline is May 3.
Learning how to suture at last year’s Oswego Hospital MASH Camp was Megan Lagoe, of Oswego. Offering his expertise is Oswego Hospital Surgeon Aleksandr Sokolovsky, D.O. The goal of the two-day camp is to introduce healthcare careers to students entering eighth and ninth grades. The application deadline is May 3.

Area students entering the eighth or ninth grade in the fall can learn more about healthcare careers this July at Oswego Hospital’s MASH Camp.

While July may be a few months away, the application deadline is May 3.

This year’s MASH Camp (Medical Academy of Science and Health) at Oswego Hospital will be 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 30 and 31.

During the camp, students have the opportunity to take part in hands-on activities, such as learning how to suture, which is taught by the hospital surgery center staff.

There will also be tours of many departments, providing the students with a behind-the-scenes look at the hospital and the variety of jobs offered in a healthcare setting.

All campers will receive hospital scrubs to wear each day at camp, breakfast and lunch, a T-shirt and education materials. The camp fee is $30 per student.

The camp is coordinated by the Central New York Area Health Education Center, which also offers scholarships to those students who need help paying the fee.

Space is limited to 20 students at M.A.S.H. Camp and applications will be reviewed by a selection process. Students can access the online application by visiting the CNYAHEC website at www.cnyahec.org.

PORKY & BUDDY: Shoes not a chew toy for black lab

Screen shot 2014-04-01 at 10.22.40 AMDear Porky and Buddy,

I just adopted Barney, a nine-month old black lab.

We have been going to training classes and he is dong very well.  He is house trained and really just a perfect companion and I am so happy to have him in my life.

But there is one thing. Several times in the last month I have come home from work to find that he has destroyed the heel of one of my shoes.  I love Barney, don’t get me wrong, but I love my Jimmy Choos too.  I keep them in a closet, but he actually opens the door to the closet!

What can I do to correct this behavior?

 Chelsea

 

Dear Chelsea,

We are thinking that they are called Jimmy “Choos” for a reason. Get it???

Think about it — nice leather, wrapped around what for all intents and purposes looks like a Nylabone. Of course he has figured out how to open the closet door to get at them.

Remember that chewing is a natural behavior for dogs, as they use their mouths to investigate the environment. It also helps them keep their teeth clean and strong and exercises their mouth and jaw muscles.

Dogs who seem to be chewing too much, however, especially if it mostly happens when they are home alone, may be  simply bored or lonely or anxious.

Does Barney have a crate that he can stay in when you are at work? That would lessen his anxiety, especially if he has a couple of real chew toys in there with him to keep him occupied.

If crating is not an option, you really need to “chew proof” your house, or at least that part of the house where he stays when you are away.

Lock those expensive shoes up high somewhere that he really can’t open.  What else does he chew inappropriately?  The TV remote? Magazines?  Your sunglasses?

Be very careful that all of these chew toy-sized accessories are way out of his reach.

The Jimmy Choos are probably harmless, but he can seriously hurt himself by swallowing thinks like sharp plastic pieces or electronic parts.

At the same time, where ever he is in the house when you are gone, make sure  he has great, indestructible, meant to be chew toys available to him. He is going to be a big strong boy, so you need  to look for things like Boomer balls, Nylabones, Kongs, or Tug-a-Jugs.

Some of them are made with cavities that you can fill with small treats so they are even more fun for him.

When you do get  home, spend a lot of time with Barney. Take him for walks. Play Frisbee with him (with an indestructible Kong Frisbee).

Give him lots of  cuddle and play time, so that when you do have to leave again, he will nap happily, waiting for your return. He is always going to be way more fun than a pair of shoes!

Speaking of things that pets eat — Could you donate some dry Purina cat or kitten food to the Humane Society?

We use a lot of it for our foster cats.  You could just drop it off any time in our outer office at 265 W. First St., Oswego, or call us at 207-1070 and we will make arrangements. Thanks!

The Oswego County Humane Society provides spay/neuter services and assistance, fostering and adoption of animals in urgent need, humane education programs, and information and referrals to animal lovers throughout Oswego County.

Our office is located at 265 W. First St., Oswego. Phone is 207-1070. Email is ochscontact@hotmail.com. Website is  www.oswegohumane.org

Fulton students learn ‘who grew the soup’

Lynne Field’s first-grade class at Fairgrieve Elementary School listen to Ag Literacy Week volunteer Erica Schreiner read them the story “Who Grew My Soup” by Tom Darbyshire. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oswego County coordinated Ag Literacy Week activities at the school as a way to get students thinking about where their food comes and what food is grown and harvested in Oswego County.
Lynne Field’s first-grade class at Fairgrieve Elementary School listen to Ag Literacy Week volunteer Erica Schreiner read them the story “Who Grew My Soup” by Tom Darbyshire. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oswego County coordinated Ag Literacy Week activities at the school as a way to get students thinking about where their food comes and what food is grown and harvested in Oswego County.

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

Where does food come from?

That’s the question first-graders at Fairgrieve Elementary School in Fulton talked about during Ag Literacy Week.

Erica Schreiner, a volunteer coordinated through Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oswego County, stopped at the school during the state-wide literacy campaign to read to students the book “Who Grew My Soup” by Tom Darbyshire.

The students munched and crunched on healthy carrot snacks as she talked to the classes about eating healthy. They all then played a ‘Let’s Make Soup” game in which she got the students thinking about where their food comes from and what items are grown and harvested in Oswego County.

Ag Literacy Week is a New York state Agriculture in the Classroom initiative celebrated the week of March 17 through 21. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oswego County coordinates the educational outreach program for the Fulton City School District, organizing a literacy volunteer to stop by classrooms to discuss the importance of agriculture.

As part of the Ag Literacy Week program, the Fairgrieve Elementary School Library receives a free copy of the program’s featured book to keep in circulation for the students to sign out at their leisure.