Category Archives: Other News

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Sadie Wilson blood drive to be held July 25

Sadie Wilson

The American Red Cross is holding a blood drive in honor of Sadie Wilson from 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. July 25 at the Oswego Elks Lodge, located at 132 W. 5th St.

Sadie was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in June and, at 23 months old, she is going through chemotherapy along with having many blood transfusions.

Those seeking to schedule an appointment to donate may call 1-800-Red-Cross. Walk-ins will be accepted that day as well.

Blood can be safely donated every 56 days and platelets can be donated every seven days or up to 24 times a year.

Most healthy people ages 17 and older – or 16 with parental consent – who weigh at least 110 pounds are eligible to donate blood and platelets.

Donors who are 18 and younger must also meet specific height and weight requirements.

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OCO Summer Food Service Program will provide free meals for children

Oswego County Opportunities is participating in the Summer Food Service Program, according to Bridget Dolbear, program services coordinator for Oswego County Opportunities.

Each year, the U.S. Department of Agriculture partners with local organizations like OCO to provide free meals to children when school is out for the summer. Funded through the New York State Education Department, the Summer Food Service Program provides free meals to all children 18 years and under. Meals will be available at the local sites and times. Orders for meals are placed the day before you attend.

• Palermo Recreation, 1779 Co. Rte. 4, Palermo. Breakfast and Lunch from 9 to 10 a.m. and from noon to 1 p.m. Monday through Friday until Aug. 10.

• Fulton Alliance Church, 1044 N.Y.S. Rte. 48, Fulton. Lunch from July 9 through July 13 from noon to 12:30 p.m. • Fulton CYO, 365 W. First St., Fulton. Lunch from July 5 through Aug. 12 from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

• Fulton YMCA, 715 West Broadway, Fulton. Breakfast and lunch from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. through Aug. 31.

• CNY Arts Program, 357 State St., Fulton. Lunch from July 9 through July 20; from Aug. 6 through Aug. 10’ and Aug. 20 through Aug. 24 from noon to 12:30 p.m.

• Our Lady of Rosary VBS, 923 Cayuga St., Hannibal. Lunch from July 16 through July 20 and Aug. 20 through Aug. 24 from noon to 12:30 p.m.

• Hannibal Recreation, 824 Co. Rte. 34, Hannibal. Breakfast and lunch from July 9 through Aug. 10 from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

“We are happy to be able to offer the Summer Food Service Program,” said Dolbear. “I encourage families to participate in the program and remember that even though school’s out, meals are still in.”

Acceptance and participation requirements for the program and all activities are the same for all regardless of race, color, national origin, gender, age or disability, and there will be no discrimination in the course of the meal service. Those seeking more information on the program may call Victoria Stump at 598-4712.

Signs have been posted at Camp Hollis, the county recreation camp for youth, designating it a tobacco-free park. From left are Kathleen Fenlon, director of the Oswego City-County Youth Bureau; Abby Jenkins, program coordinator of the Oswego County Tobacco Free Coalition; and Brandon Morey, coordinator of youth and recreation development for the Oswego County Youth Bureau.

Oswego County legislature adopts tobacco-free parks policy

Signs have been posted at Camp Hollis designating it a tobacco-free park. From left are Kathleen Fenlon, director of the Oswego City-County Youth Bureau; Abby Jenkins, program coordinator of the Oswego County Tobacco Free Coalition; and Brandon Morey, coordinator of youth and recreation development for the Oswego County Youth Bureau.

The Oswego County Legislature has adopted a tobacco-free parks policy for county parks.

The action was taken at the annual “Government Day” program of the legislature with seventh grade students from around the county participating in the meeting.

“Residents of all ages enjoy the pristine environment of our parks and trails,” said Legislator John Proud, chairman of the Legislature’s Health and Human Services Committee. “People should be able to use and exercise in all Oswego County-owned parks without being exposed to the harmful effects of secondhand smoke.”

The three county parks maintained by the Oswego City-County Youth Bureau are Camp Hollis in the Town of Oswego, Camp Zerbe Nature Park in Williamstown, and Independence Trail in Scriba.

Kathleen Fenlon, director of the Oswego City-County Youth Bureau, said her agency has made it a practice to restrict tobacco use at the county parks.

“Children have smaller lungs than an adult, and therefore breathe in 50 percent more air pollution than an adult.”

“This action by the county legislature makes the Youth Bureau practice an official county policy,” said Fenlon. “Oswego County does not allow the use of tobacco products on the entirety of the Independence Trail system. There are designated smoking areas behind the maintenance shed on the Camp Zerbe and Camp Hollis property grounds; the rest of these facility grounds are tobacco-free.”

According to Abby Jenkins, program coordinator for the Oswego County Tobacco Free Coalition, discarded cigarette butts constitute the majority of litter on beaches, parks, playgrounds, and sidewalks.

“It’s important to focus on the health and safety of our children, community members, pets and wildlife by making our outdoor recreational areas tobacco free, especially when 75 percent of Oswego County adult residents favor smoke-free parks and playgrounds,” said Jenkins. “Making our local outdoor public areas tobacco-free keeps them beautiful and free of pollution, protects our children and wildlife from ingesting toxic cigarette butts, prevents second hand smoke exposure, and maintains positive role-modeling for youth.”

The resolution was discussed and approved by the Legislature’s Health and Human Services Committee prior to a vote by the full legislature.

More than 300 municipalities in New York State have adopted a tobacco-free outdoor area policy or ordinance.

Oswego Youth Court will train new members in July

The Oswego Youth Court will hold a training class for new members from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 9 through 13 at Oswego City Hall. The deadline for applications is Friday, July 6.

Students in grades 7 through 12 are eligible to apply for Youth Court training.

“This program provides a valuable experience for its members,” said Dawn Metott, city youth coordinator for the Oswego City-County Youth Bureau.

“In addition to the benefit of helping their communities and influencing their peers in a positive way, members of Youth Court will learn or improve their public speaking, interviewing and writing skills.”

“Youth Court hears real cases of youthful offenders who are referred by local law enforcement agencies or schools for first time minor offenses,” said Brian Chetney, county youth coordinator for the Oswego City-County Youth Bureau. “Students are trained to be judges, defense attorneys, prosecuting attorneys and court clerks. Members conduct hearings related to their cases and decide on the outcome and punishment for each case.”

The Oswego Youth Court Program is a Family Court diversion program designed to create a “new pathway” for troubled youth. The program also serves youth that commit crimes that are not usually entertained by Family Court.

Oswego Youth Courts are sponsored by the City of Oswego, the County of Oswego, the Oswego City-County Youth Bureau, and the New York State Office of Children and Family Services.

Applications can be obtained at any Oswego County school district guidance office, at the Oswego City-County Youth Bureau, 70 Bunner St., Oswego, and at www.oswegony.org/DEPT_youth.html.

Completed applications may be mailed to Oswego Youth Court, c/o Oswego City-County Youth Bureau, 70 Bunner St., Oswego, 13126.

Those seeking more information may contact Brian Chetney or Dawn Metott at 349-3575 or email youthcourt@oswegocounty.com.

Oswego County BOCES District Superintendent Christopher Todd (left) visits the Welding Technology program during his first day on campus and is pictured with student Danielle Smith of Central Square and Director of Career and Technical Education and Alternative Programs Ronald Camp.

BOCES welcomes district superintendent

Oswego County BOCES District Superintendent Christopher Todd (left) visits the Welding Technology program during his first day on campus and is pictured with student Danielle Smith of Central Square and Director of Career and Technical Education and Alternative Programs Ronald Camp.

The Oswego County Board of Cooperative Educational Services welcomed the arrival of a new district superintendent.

Christopher Todd began his post at the start of June. He was appointed earlier this school year following a recruitment process that spanned several months and included input from component school districts, students, staff, and community partners.

Selected from a field of candidates, BOCES Board of Education President John Shelmidine said, “Mr. Todd brings a fresh sense of excitement and energy to our organization and I am excited about working closely with him as we move forward with our capital improvement project.”

“This is an exciting time for education,” said Todd. “Conversations at the state level indicate an understanding of multiple pathways for success for our students. This speaks to the heart of BOCES’ programming.”

Prior to his appointment at Oswego County BOCES, Todd served as the superintendent of schools at the Oakfield-Alabama Central School District, a position he held since 2007.

In addition to his superintendency, Todd’s tenure in education includes experience as a classroom teacher, high school principal, middle school principal as well as a career and technical education principal with the Franklin-Essex BOCES.

Legislators discuss pending litigation

by Carol Thompson

At the conclusion of Tuesday’s meeting of the Oswego County Legislature’s Infrastructure and Facilities Committee meeting, legislators entered into executive session to discuss pending litigation in the matter of JWJ vs. Oswego County.

Jeffrey Holbrook, owner of JWJ, Inc. is reportedly pursuing his case against the county in the matter of the Flow Control law that was passed October 2008.

The law mandated that all construction and demolition waste generated inside the county had to be disposed of within the county.

Holbrook sued in federal county, claiming that the new law would put him out if business if he was forced to dump within the county boundaries.

He won the case with the judge ruling that the county’s law is unconstitutionally vague.

To read the rest of the column, subscribe to The Valley News by calling 315-598-6397

Committee postpones FOIL policy

by Carol Thompson

The Oswego County Legislature’s Strategic Planning and Government Committee took no action on adopting a new Freedom of Information Law (FOIL) policy until more information is gathered.

Legislators said last month that they wanted to seek the opinion of Robert Freeman, the executive director of the New York State Committee on Open Government prior to adopting a policy.

During Thursday’s meeting, Legislature Clerk Wendy Falls said she had contacted Freeman and he suggested contacting the New York State Association of Counties because the issue relates more to policy than Freedom of Information law.

Minority Leader Mike Kunzwiler asked if NYSCA would have more of a benchmark type of policy.

To read the rest of the story, subscribe to The Valley News by calling 315-598-6397

County data management contract award still in limbo

by Carol Thompson

The Oswego County Legislature won’t be awarding a data management contract for the county clerk’s office when they meet next week.

An update given during Wednesday’s meeting of the Community and Consumer Affairs Committee had little to offer, said Legislator Amy Tresidder.

County Administrator Phil Church said that the committee assigned to review the request for proposals had not completed the work, Tresidder said.

The county has been attempting to award a contract for over 18 months as controversy has shrouded the process on previous occasions. The latest round of solicitation for proposals resulted in eight vendors submitting quotes.

Due to the controversy, Church is autonomously handling the process, something that not all legislators are comfortable with.

Following findings of conflicts of interest with the current vendor, Church said that all communication between employees and any of the bidders would cease.

To read the rest of the story, subscribe to The Valley News by calling 315-598-6397