Category Archives: Sports

Archer recommends reading ‘Fishing The Finger Lakes’

By Leon Archer

Michael Kelly, a former Syracuse Post-Standard outdoor columnist, and long-time member of the New York Outdoor Writer’s Association, as well as being a personal friend of mine, sent me a copy of his latest book. That book,” FISHING THE FINGERLAKES, A Complete Guide to Prime Fishing Locations in Central New York State,” just came out in September, and I have already read it from cover to cover.

I found it to be an easy-to-read book, filled with useful, up to date information, which left me itching to try each one of the Finger Lakes that I have missed.

Mike has fished the region successfully for more than 50 years, so you can bank on the accuracy and value of what he shares in his book.

When you think of the Finger Lakes, you probably think of Owasco, Seneca, Cayuga, Keuka, and possibly, Skaneateles, but there are six more Finger Lakes, and Mike has fished them all.

He is a dedicated trout fishermen, but he knows plenty about catching the jumbo perch, land locked salmon, huge bluegills, plentiful bass and walleyes that lurk in the lakes.

He tells when and where your chances are best for the different species and how to fish for them. Whether you are a shore fisherman or have a boat, his advice is basic enough to give you a good chance at coming home with fish for the family.

I can assure you, whenever I went fishing with Mike, we caught fish – usually nice ones.

I highly recommend this book. If you have any interest in fishing the Finger Lakes, but don’t know where to start, it should be required reading.

If you are looking for a present for someone who enjoys fishing, I think it would be a perfect gift. It is 256 pages filled enjoyment and knowledge and only costs $16.95. It is available from online bookstores as well as many other sources.  Enjoy.

Fulton wrestlers ‘Pay It Forward’

“The Great Turkey RUN” has always been a Fulton wrestling tradition on Thanksgiving Day.

Some suspect this was the coaches’ way of making sure the boys worked off a few of those fattening turkey day treats!

Starting this year, the traditional run has grown to become so much more.

The Fulton community has always been known for showing its tremendous love and support for these hard working , dedicated kids and the wrestlers wanted to show their appreciation for this loyalty by “Paying It Forward.” On Thanksgiving morning, the boys ran their traditional 3-mile run around the city while passing around a frozen turkey.

Meanwhile, the wrestlers’ parents collected donated frozen turkeys at Price Chopper in Fulton. These turkeys would be donated to he local food pantry for use in Christmas baskets and emergency food support programs.

The wrestlers felt this was one small way they could give back to all of their loyal Fulton supporters who may be struggling this year to provide a joyful holiday for their families. The Fulton wrestlers want to express their sincere thanks to all those wonderful people who donated turkeys for this event.

Fulton boys’ basketball team focusing on one game at a time

By Rob Tetro

The Fulton boys’ varsity basketball team this season wants to focus on one game at a time.

And by doing so, it hopes to win eight games.

Fulton coach Matt Kimpland says the Red Raiders can reassess their goals if they earn those eight wins.

But, Kimpland mentions his team has goals for activities off the court as well. Fulton is striving to be a team that has every player earning at least a 3.5 GPA (grade point average) while missing very little school at the same time.

This season, the Red Raiders will feature five starters with limited playing time at the varsity level.

Kimpland considers sophomore Cody Green the only returning starter from last season’s team and he was able to play only half of the season.

Mark Pollock, Seth Britton and Austin Haskins also return from last year’s team.

All 11 players showed tremendous involvement in the summer tournaments in which Fulton participated.

They played against teams from Oswego, Red Creek, North Rose-Wolcott and Phoenix to name a few. The team played in 25-30 games from June through August.

The Red Raiders came away with the St. Bonaventure Team Tournament Championship, but lost to Jamesville-DeWitt by 15 points in the semifinals of another tournament.

Fulton began in-season practice Nov. 11. An open gym was held during the two weeks leading up to the start of practice. The Red Raiders used those open gym sessions to develop the conditioning needed for basketball participation.

Despite having many players who were physically able to take part in fall sports such as football and soccer, the team struggled during the first few days of practice to make the adjustment to the conditioning needed for basketball.

Currently, Kimpland feels that the conditioning of his team is about 85 percent to 90 percent of what it needs to be. The Red Raiders begin the season following Thanksgiving and were expected to have met Kimpland’s conditioning goals by that time.

Fulton has not yet named captains for the upcoming season. Kimpland points out the individuals he selects for the job will display strong leadership abilities and be able to encourage teammates to step up during moments of adversity.

While assessing the schedule for the upcoming season, Kimpland suggests the Red Raiders will be challenged early and often. Fulton will participate in a Watertown tournament followed by games against Central Square, Camden, Jamesville-DeWitt, Bishop Ludden and Christian Brothers Academy.

Kimpland feels this will allow his team to become battle tested rather quickly. He said the tough early schedule his team faces will allow them to be a tougher team during the second half of the season.

Kimpland said his team is excited to take on some of the best teams Section 3 offers. He suggests this team could be one of the most skilled teams Fulton has had in a long time. Many of the players consider basketball their favorite sport to play and have the skills to show for it.

The Red Raiders will be a team with a great desire to compete and succeed. Fulton will also be a team that plays with poise and intensity regardless of the circumstances they may face this season.

The team also will have offensive versatility. Shooters like Cody Green and Brian Hudson will help Fulton stretch the floor, while big men like Chris Jones and Seth Britton will be able to keep opposing defenses honest with their presence down low.

Fulton Pee Wees hockey wins one, loses one

The Fulton Pee Wees hockey team, sponsored by Cargill, Inc., Foster Funeral Home and Pathfinder Bank, competed in two games this past weekend — beating Ithaca 4-1 but dropping a hard-fought contest to Camillus 4-3.

The action started when the Pee Wees traveled to Ithaca Saturday.

The Pee Wees began the first period strong with an early goal by #35 Eric Shear that was assisted by #25 Sidney Bradshaw. Ithaca countered that goal with one of their own that ended the first period in a tie 1-1.

The second period saw the most activity with an initial goal from #71 Chayton Sykes that was assisted by #35 Eric Shear. Shear ended the period with two more unassisted goals putting Fulton in the lead 4-1 going into the third period.

The third period saw some exceptional defensive and offensive play from #48 Andrew Hyde, #88 Calexander Connolly and #10 Madison Lewis along with the rest of their teammates. The Pee Wees held off Ithaca throughout the 3rd period ending the game with a win 4-1.

Fulton’s goalie #20 Nathaniel Lindsey saved 11 goals.

Hitting home ice on Sunday Nov. 24, Fulton faced off against Camillus 1.

Fulton blazed through the first period earning the first goal of the game with an over-the-shoulder netter by #35 Eric Shear, assisted by #00 Jadon Lee and #86 Johnathan McCann.

Camillus tied it up by the end of the first period and took control in the second period netting two more against Fulton.

In the third period, Camillus garnered themselves a fourth goal.

Pulling themselves up and back into action, Fulton’s #35 Eric Shear netted two more goals that were assisted by #25 Sidney Bradshaw and #2 Jarred Willis, Jr.

Pulling their goalie for the last few seconds of play, the Pee Wees including #15 Derek Carter and #32 Lane Phillips gave their all in an effort to try to tie up the game.

In the end, they weren’t able to pull it off and Camillus won 4-3.

Fulton’s goalie #20 Nathaniel Lindsey saved 28 goals.

A Sportman’s World, by Leon Archer

By Leon Archer

My brother, Warren, was five years older than me.

He had his own older friends who weren’t interested in my hanging around with them, and in all honesty, I had no desire to hang around with him and his friends either.

There were only two exceptions to that mutually acceptable separation – hunting and fishing. I fished with Warren whenever he gave me the opportunity, but it wasn’t until I was nearly a teen that he went out of his way to take me with him.

Hunting was a little different story. When I was about 9 or 10, I got the chance to go with Warren and my father as they hunted together. I had to walk behind my father, but I didn’t care, and I did get to take my BB gun with me.

It was all so exciting for me, especially when they would shoot at a rabbit or partridge, or even a grey squirrel in the limbs high above us.

I got the job of carrying whatever they shot. It wasn’t child abuse, it was a labor of love. Warren became a pretty good shot during the two years that he apprenticed with my father, and once he was 16, dad let him go hunting on his own, confident that he would be fine.

My father was not a big time small game hunter; although, when the time arrived, he came out of retirement long enough to get me through my two years of being a junior hunter.

I was especially fortunate that none of Warren’s friends were all that interested in hunting, so when he started hunting on his own he often took me with him. My job was to jump on all the brush piles the farmers had made in the fields. Back then, just about every third pile of brush could be counted on to have a cottontail hiding in it.

I also took it upon myself to walk through big clumps of low juniper bushes which were fairly consistent rabbit holders as well. Warren knocked off a good percentage of the fleeing cottontails, so I often found myself carrying three or four rabbits by the time we headed for home.

My best memories are of the times that Warren would bring down a partridge. To my way of thinking, the Ruffed Grouse was (and still is) the premier game bird, even more so than the gaudy ring necked pheasant that I also love to hunt.

I had the greatest admiration for my brother’s shooting ability when it came to grouse. I was present many times when he quickly zeroed in on a rapidly disappearing bird with a load of sixes.

I can close my eyes and picture a spot that my brother and I never failed to check out for birds when we were hunting in the fields and woods in back of our house in Sandy Creek. The lots and the adjoining woods belonged to a dairy farmer, Mr. Allen, who had no objection to our hunting there as long as we didn’t disturb his herd of Guernsey cows, and we took full advantage of the opportunity.

The spot I am writing about was at the edge of the fields that comprised Mr. Allen’s pasture. On one side there was a stand of new poplar saplings that jutted out into the field.

Walking farther west after clearing the thicket of saplings (which itself often concealed grouse or wood cock) we would come to what is my favorite grouse spot of all time. There had been an apple orchard there countless years before, and a couple of long untended trees still managed to survive. They continued to bear well year after year, and the fruit was a magnet for every partridge living in the big woods beyond.

My brother took his share of unlucky grouse from that locale each year he hunted, and I followed suit in the years after he moved away. I have many memories of that tiny portion of my world, but the best is of the first time my brother shot a partridge there.

It had thundered out from underneath one of the apple trees as we approached, putting leaves and apples between himself and my brother. Warren had been tracking the bird even as he brought the gun up to his shoulder.

He shot quickly, directly through the leaves that pretty much obscured the bird, but instinctively targeting the spot where the bird should be.

A moment later, I could hear a putt, putt, putt sound. I did not know what it was then, but like most every other grouse hunter, I have learned it indicates a successful hunt.

It is the sound of wings still reflexively beating, in their diminishing futile attempt to carry the now dead bird to safety. Running underneath that apple tree, I found the bird about 30 feet beyond, while its wings still jerked spasmodically. In moments; however, all movement ceased as I clutched the limp, beautiful warm bird in my hands.

I admired the exquisite brown patterned feathers of its back, the black ruff around its collar, and the long, barred feathers of the tail fan. The breast feathers were darkly barred over a creamy white.

As I held that bird, exulting in the feat I had observed, and feeling  that somehow I was at least a small part of it, for some reason I was drawn to smell of its warm body. I can still smell it today.

It was the wild smell of the woods, the fallen leaves and the ripe apples, yet that poor description does not truly do it justice. Over the years I have shot many grouse, but I have never failed to bury my nose in the feathers of each and breathe in that day once more.

I would give a great deal to be able to hunt grouse just once more with my brother on a warm October day, and match skill and wits with those magnificent birds. Perhaps there will come a day.

Who knows? I for one have no problem with the American Indians’ description of Heaven as the Happy Hunting Grounds, but if it exists, it must contain Heavenly wild apple trees and celestial grouse.

Fulton wrestlers strive for sectional, state supremacy

By Rob Tetro

The Fulton varsity wrestling team comes into the 2013-14 season with great expectations.

Varsity wrestling coach Chris Stalker said the Red Raiders are hard at work preparing to make a run at both a Section 3 Championship and The Class B State Championship.

However, Stalker is aware of the winning tradition associated with Fulton wrestling. In fact, he suggests the best way to respect the Red Raiders winning tradition is to duplicate it.

“We always want to be one of the top 10 teams in all of New York state,” Stalker said.

Fulton will have its work cut out for it to accomplish those goals. Only a few wrestlers return from last season’s team. For the most part, the Red Raiders are a young and inexperienced squad.

In preparation for the upcoming season, wrestlers have been allowed and encouraged to take part in the morning lift sessions available to them four days a week before school.

Fulton also has a wrestling club in which the school’s wrestlers can participate. The wrestling club is an open mat workout available to The Red Raiders 3 days a week.

Currently, Fulton is in good physical condition, but Stalker said there is room for improvement. On top of the morning workout sessions and the wrestling club, the Red Raiders practice usually lasts 2 to 2 ½ hours.

Stalker said recentl practices have gotten more and more intense. Aided by an additional 30 minutes of conditioning development, the wrestlers are showing they are physical capable of handling more intense practices.

The Red Raiders have not yet named team captains for the upcoming season. The criteria Stalker uses for naming a captain is based on leadership, commitment and initiative.

A wrestler Stalker is considering naming a captain is someone who leads both verbally and with action and makes the most out of every practice — a wrestler who takes advantage of the opportunities that the morning lift sessions and the wrestling club offer is also someone who could be named a captain.

As Stalker assess his teams’ schedule, two opponents immediately stand out —   Phoenix and Baldwinsville. Stalker considers those teams to be two of the top teams in all of Section 3.

The Red Raiders will be looking to avenge losses to both schools from last season.

Interestingly enough, Stalker feels his teams’ inexperience can be considered a strength. Thus far, Stalker’s young team has shown development as a result of a lot of hard work and enthusiasm.

Hannibal football players receive honors

By Rob Tetro

Eleven Hannibal varsity football players earned Class C-West All League Honors for the 2013 season.

Eight of those players were named to first and second offensive and defensive teams, while the remaining three Hannibal football players earned honorable mention honors.

Senior running back Tim Webber, senior quarterback Trevor Alton and senior kicker Lander Ezama were named to the Class C-West, Offensive All-League First Team. While junior defensive end Nate Welling earned First Team, All-League Defensive Honors.

Junior tight end Austin Mattison and freshman wide receiver Conor McNeil were named to the Class C-West, Offensive All-League Second Team. Senior linebackers Christian Knox and Greg Hadcock came away with Second Team, All-League Defensive Honors. Charlie McCraith, Devon Weldin and Jake Whitcomb were given honorable mention acknowledgement.

Fulton wrestling kicks off Saturday, Nov. 30

Wrestling in Fulton kicks off Saturday Nov. 30 with a dual meet pitting the Fulton Raider against the Canandaigua Braves at G. Ray Bodley High.

Battles between these two intersectional rivals over the years have been fiercely competitive. The two teams have met 13 times in the series with seven of the matches being decided by the outcome of a single bout.

“The Fulton-Canandaigua super dual is one of the highlights of the season for our program”, said Fulton’s second-year head coach Chris Stalker. “Fulton and Canandaigua have a long history of great duals and tournament competition. High school wrestling doesn’t get any better than this”, he said.

Canandaigua is led by Section V Class Finalist Vinny Romeo at 152 lbs. The Braves have four Section V Class A place-winners in their line-up: Romeo, Nate Gilligan at 132, Mitch Fisher at 170 and Daniel Dillon at 220.

Fulton is led by Section 3 Champion Mitchell Woodworth at 120, Class A Champion Brandon Hill at 132, and Joey Abelgore who placed fourth in the Section 3 Tournament at 99 pounds.

This is the first dual meet to be held on Thanksgiving weekend. The early season match-up was organized to fit Canandaigua in the schedule and give alumni and fans home for the holidays a chance to see the event.

The varsity dual is scheduled for 1:30 pm following the noon-time junior varsity dual.