Category Archives: Oswego News

Oswego High grad designs winning Harborfest poster

Catherine Wells with her winning Harborfest poster design.
Catherine Wells with her winning Harborfest poster design.

The winner of the Harborfest poster design contest for 2014 is recent Oswego High School graduate Catherine Wells.

Each year, Harborfest has an elaborate poster design. Sometimes it goes with a theme, or there is a contest with guidelines.

In the most recent years, posters have been created by Oswego High School students in a computer graphics class taught by Melissa Martin.

They are given a description of what should be included in the Harborfest poster. This year the students were given ships and the lighthouse.

The winning design is chosen by Harborfest staff, and the overlay to turn it into the Harborfest poster is done by Step-One Creative.

Wells graduated from Oswego High School in 2013 and was senior class vice president and the National Honor Society president, as well as a member of Key Club, student council, and played soccer throughout high school.

She is attending Ithaca College where she is studying television-radio.

“Computer graphics my senior year was the first art class I’d taken,” said Wells. She went on to explain “it shows how great a teacher Mrs. Martin is — her students learn how to use Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop in a short span of time, but are able to create awesome projects by the end of the year.”

Harborfest is July 24 through 27. Saturday night will feature fireworks by Grucci presented by Entergy Nuclear.

For more information, call Harborfest staff at 343-6858.

Health clinics for week of May 5

The Oswego County Health Department offers a variety of services to all residents of Oswego County, including preventive health services, certified home health care, long-term home health care, certified hospice, and a maternal and child health program.

Walk-in influenza clinics are held weekdays from 9 to 11 a.m. and 1 to 3 p.m. at the Nick Sterio Public Health Clinic, 70 Bunner St., Oswego for people age 19 and older. No appointment is needed; walk-ins are welcome.

Immunization clinics are held every Tuesday from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. at 70 Bunner St., Oswego, and the third Tuesday of every month from 9 to 11 a.m. at the H. Douglas Barclay Courthouse, Pulaski.

Children’s flu vaccine is now available every Tuesday from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. in Oswego, and the third Tuesday of every month from 9 to 11 a.m. at the H. Douglas Barclay Courthouse, Pulaski.

The children’s flu vaccine is available at no cost to all children who qualify for the Vaccines for Children Program provided by the state Health Department. For those who do not qualify, the cost is $37 for the inactivated vaccine.

The health department accepts cash or checks for payment. The department does not accept credit or debit cards.

Patients with private insurance, Managed Medicaid, Managed Medicare, Medicaid, Medicare, and Medicare Part B should bring their benefit cards with them to the immunization clinic.  No one will be turned away due to inability to pay.

The following services will be offered during the week of May 5 at the Nick Sterio Public Health Clinic, 70 Bunner St., Oswego.

  • Adult Influenza Clinic: Monday through Friday, 9 to 11 a.m. and 1 to 3 p.m., walk-in clinic.
  • Immunization Clinic: Tuesday, May 6, 12:30 to 3:30 p.m., walk-in clinic.
  • Pregnancy Testing: Free pregnancy testing is available. Call 349-3391 to schedule an appointment.
  • Sexually Transmitted Disease Testing and Treatment Services: Call 349-3547 to schedule an appointment.
  • HIV Counseling and Testing Service:  Call 349-3547 to schedule an appointment.
  • Pulaski Rabies Clinic: The health department will hold a rabies clinic for cats, dogs, and pet ferrets from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, May 7, at the Oswego County Highway Garage, 957 Centerville Road, Pulaski. A $5 donation is suggested.

For more information about public health services offered by the county, contact the County Health Department, weekdays, phone 349-3547 or (800) 596-3200, ext. 3547.

For information on rabies clinics, call 349-3564.

Event planning courses at SUNY Oswego Metro Center

Employees tasked with planning the annual holiday party, volunteers or board members for nonprofit organizations helping with an annual event, small-business owners working on a project or parents planning a graduation party can attend SUNY Oswego’s Event Planning Program to learn about becoming more effective and efficient event planners.

The two-course program, offered at the SUNY Oswego Metro Center, 2 Clinton Square in downtown Syracuse, consists of two separate courses. The first course is 6 to 9 p.m. May 7 and 14; the second is 6 to 9 p.m. May 21 and 28.

Students who successfully complete both courses will earn a Certificate of Completion and one continuing education credit (CEU).

The program will provide key strategies for managing event logistics, critical planning techniques for negotiating contracts, tactics for dealing with sponsors and overall insight into the intricacies of event management.

“This is a fun, interactive program that provides participants with valuable information,” instructor Bill Motto said.

“A lot of people know a little bit about event planning; this program takes them a step further and lets them plan events that impress. Often times it’s the small things that make big impacts. It’s just the edge that a lot of people are looking for,” Motto said.

Participants may take one course for $199 or both for $349. Additional discounts are available for SUNY Oswego alumni, faculty, staff and current students. CSEA vouchers are accepted.

Course 1 provides an overview of event planning and presents critical planning, logistics, hospitality, negotiations and contracts. Course 2 focuses on risk management, marketing, financing, merchandising, economic impact and charitable events.

To register, or for more information, visit www.oswego.edu/eventplanning or call the SUNY Oswego Metro Center at 399-4100.

 

Connecting with customers focus of May 1 meeting

Conklin
Conklin

When it comes to embracing products and services, To succeed as entrepreneurs, people must differentiate themselves and rise above the clutter to connect with customers and clients.

Susan Conklin will show how to find opportunities to connect with our customers and clients at the next Women’s Network for Entrepreneurial Training’s (WNET) monthly breakfast meeting at 8 a.m., Thursday, May 1, at the SUNY Oswego Phoenix Center in the Oswego County Industrial Park, Phoenix (exit 14, State Route 481).

This presentation focuses on using process mapping to identify opportunities to add value to your customers’ experience, by understanding how and when to effectively make contact.

Conklin is a university-level instructor, consultant, trainer and coach.

Owner of Concentric Personal and Professional Growth, she uses her 20 years of corporate experience managing people and projects to design and facilitate training programs that improve business performance.

The cost for each seminar is $12 for members and $15 for non-members.

The WNET annual (Sept. 2013-Aug.2014) membership cost is $25. Each seminar includes a light breakfast.

Pre-registration is required. Call Operation Oswego County, weekdays, at 343-1545, or via e-mail elivoti@oswegocounty.org.

Tidy up Fort Ontario May 3

Tidying up Fort Ontario is the focus of I Love My Park Day May 3.

I Love My Park Day is a statewide event to improve and enhance New York’s state parks and historic sites.

Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. with work to start by 9 a.m. There will be assignments available for all ages and abilities.

Projects scheduled include:

Readying buildings – sweeping, dusting, mopping and returning exhibits to buildings from storage;

Painting – exterior of Officer Quarters’ privy as well as the fort’s many benches; and

Landscaping/clean-up –trimming of hedges and bushes inside the old fort, weeding and mulching flowerbeds in parking lots, cleaning up sticks, branches, and winter debris throughout the grounds, edging  sidewalks and pulling young weeds that grow among the stonework of the old fort.

Those interested in volunteering for any of Fort Ontario’s I LOVE MY PARK DAY projects may pre-register at www.ptny.org/ilovemypark, or by emailing Jenny Emmons, event coordinator, at jenny.emmons@parks.ny.gov or calling 343-4711.

SUNY Oswego students raise money for CAC

Denvol Haye, president of Delta Kappa Kappa, left, and Eli Kim Swallow, a member of the SUNY Oswego men’s ice hockey team, right, present Melanie Proper, mental health counselor with the Child Advocacy Center of Oswego County with the proceeds from the ‘For the Kids’ fundraiser.
Denvol Haye, president of Delta Kappa Kappa, left, and Eli Kim Swallow, a member of the SUNY Oswego men’s ice hockey team, right, present Melanie Proper, mental health counselor with the Child Advocacy Center of Oswego County with the proceeds from the ‘For the Kids’ fundraiser.

Hundreds of SUNY Oswego students filled The Shed recently to show their support for the Child Advocacy Center (CAC) of Oswego County, based in Fulton.

Hosted by Delta Kappa Kappa Inc. (DKK), in collaboration with SUNY Oswego’s men’s varsity ice hockey team, the ‘For the Kids’ fundraiser was the culmination of a campaign created by SUNY Oswego students Denvol Haye, president of DKK, and Eli Kim Swallow, a forward on the SUNY Oswego men’s ice hockey team, to raise money for the CAC and to help raise awareness of child abuse in Oswego County.

The ‘For the Kids’ fundraiser, which was held April 12 at The Shed, 1 Washington Blvd. in Oswego, began in the afternoon and continued into the evening.

The ‘For the Kids’ fundraiser, which featured a barbecue, both a silent and chinese auction, music provided courtesy of WNYO, and a live performance from Zeta band, raised more than $2,500.

In addition to the event at The Shed, Haye and Swallow created an online donation page at indiegogo.com that received more than $1,000 in donations.

“We’re very pleased with the results of our ‘For the Kids’ campaign,” said Haye.  “In addition to SUNY students we had several groups of parents and families that joined us in the afternoon.  It was a great success.”

With more than $3,600 raised in support of the CAC, Haye said they are looking forward to planning next year’s ‘For the Kids’ campaign and are hoping it becomes an annual event.

“It was encouraging to see the support we received, from not only our fellow students, but from the community as well.  From the families that attended the event to the many businesses who donated items for our auctions, the feedback we received was overwhelmingly positive,” said Haye.

Delta Kappa Kappa, a social fraternity whose general purpose is to foster the development of fellowship, scholarship, and leadership in young men, and the SUNY Oswego men’s ice hockey team, each have a history of supporting nonprofit organizations in and around Oswego.

“We have a lot of respect for what the CAC does,” said Swallow. “With April being National Child Abuse Awareness Month, we felt it was a perfect time to help the CAC raise awareness of child abuse in our community and the many services that the CAC provides for children and their families who have suffered child abuse.”

Located at 301 Beech St., Fulton, with a satellite office at 4822 Salina St., Pulaski, the CAC of Oswego County is a nonprofit charitable organization that works hand-in-hand with local law enforcement, prosecution, child protective services, probation, medical providers, therapy providers, and victim advocacy professionals in Oswego County to protect and serve children that are victims of sexual and physical abuse.

For more information on the Child Advocacy Center of Oswego County, call  592-4453.

Police Report

From the Oswego County Sheriff’s Office:

Laurie J. Wakeman, 51, of 311 Lehigh Road, Pulaski, charged with grand larceny and welfare fraud, both felonies, following an investigation conducted by the Oswego County Department of Social Services in which she allegedly obtained services in the form of Medicaid with a value of over $1,000 due to not disclosing incomes received.

Wakeman was arraigned in Mexico town court and released on her own recognizance.

A 13-year-old Syracuse male, a 13-year-old Baldwinsville male and a 14-year-old Liverpool male are charged with Juvenile Delinquency for acts, if committed by an adult would constitute the charges of petit larceny, a misdemeanor and burglary, a felony.

Deputies said the youths entered the Scriba Town Park and illegally gaining entry to a building and ransacking it along with stealing a package of bracelets.

Michael J. Proud, 25, of 1168 County Route 20, Oswego, was charged with felony DWI (previous conviction in 10 years), and numerous traffic infractions following a traffic stop on State Route 481 in the town of Volney.

He was arraigned before Volney Town Justice James Aluzzi and will be back in court May 26.

Fulton Police Department:

Earl C. Dedeaux, 41, of West Second Street, Fulton, charged with assault second degree, a felony; strangulation second degree, a felony; attempt to commit rape first degree, a felony; and unlawful imprisonment first degree, a felony.

Police said on April 6 between the hours of 10 and 10:30 p.m. At 213 W. Second St., he attempted to forcibly engage in sexual intercourse with the victim. Police said while doing this, he grabbed and squeezed the victim’s throat causing her breathing to become restricted. Police said Dedeaux also slapped the victim across the face to prevent her from calling out for help.

Albert R. Mendez, 24, of East Broadway, Fulton, is charged with criminal contempt, a felony, and criminal mischief, a felony.

Police say on March 12, he broke a cell phone during a domestic dispute. Being with this victim also violated an order of protection signed by a state Supreme Court justice stating he should refrain from criminal mischief or any offenses against the victim.

Travis D.C. Hoskins, 18, of Emery Street and South 11th Street, Fulton, charged with a felony counts of burglary and criminal mischief.

Police say he intentionally damaged a residential steel door and casing by kicking it, resulting in about $400 of damage. Police say he also entered the residence and stayed inside.

County Envirothon takes to the woods Thursday

By Ashley M. Casey

Bring your boots: rain or shine, young nature enthusiasts will be facing off tomorrow at the Oswego County Envirothon, held at Jellystone Park in Mexico.

Since 1991, the Oswego County Soil and Water Conservation District has sponsored the county’s Envirothon, a hands-on test of high school students’ knowledge of forestry, aquatics, soils, wildlife and current environmental issues.

The county winner goes on to the New York state competition. Last year’s county champion, Altmar-Parish-Williamstown, came in 11th of 49 teams at the state Envirothon.

“(Envirothon) encourages students to be more in tune with the environment and the natural resources in the county,” said Erica Schreiner, district educator of the Oswego County Soil and Water Conservation District and Envirothon Coordinator.

The competition consists of five 30-minute exams with 25 questions, plus a video presentation submitted prior to the event.

Teams of five students must properly identify trees, analyze soil and perform other tasks to demonstrate their environmental knowledge. Schools can send two teams of five with up to two alternates.

Local experts in each field create a new test for each subject each year. This year, the Oswego County branch of Cornell Cooperative Extension is covering the current issue of sustainable local agriculture.

Schreiner said Envirothon is an outdoorsy outlet to keep students engaged.

“It sparks their interest in something and gives them something to belong to,” she said. “It’s a great hands-on event.”

Some Envirothon participants pursue the interest after high school.

“A lot of them do go on to ESF (SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry) at Syracuse and other environmental colleges,” Schreiner said.

Jamie Hefti, adviser of two Envirothon teams at Pulaski, said one of his graduating senior “stars” will study biology at Harvard University and another is headed to Clarkson University for environmental engineering.

He said the competition’s individual focus helps prepares students for college, especially the oral video presentation.

“It’s so self-directed. It’s on them,” Hefti said. “When I watched them prepare for the oral part of it, I think it’s the most truly applicable skill for preparing for college that there is in high school.”

Hefti said he has a study area in his classroom for students to visit and borrow materials when they have a free period during the day. The students each become an “expert” on one of the subjects and coach each other.

“It’s really an awesome thing to observe,” he said.

Roxane Thormann and her husband, Rich, led the APW team to a surprise victory last year. The Thormanns volunteered to coach APW’s Envirothon team after their daughter’s beloved science teacher retired. Roxane Thormann said she and her husband, who are not teachers, faced a “big learning curve” in coaching the kids in environmental science.

“We were awestruck,” Thormann said of the 2013 win, which was APW’s first Oswego County Envirothon victory. “We didn’t have any idea we had it in us. (The team was) just flabbergasted.”

Catherine Celeste and Billie Jo Peterson are the co-advisers of the environmental club at Oswego High School The club is open to students in grades seven through 12, so it provides a “feeder group” of middle schoolers preparing for the high school Envirothon team.

“I have a lot of younger kids … getting some of the preparation long before they have a chance to compete in it,” Celeste said.

In addition to the Envirothon, Oswego’s environmental club focuses on eco-tourism, fundraising and cleaning up around the district.

“We hope, bottom line, that there’s a better appreciation for nature, and we want our students to be better earth stewards,” Celeste said. “Every year they’re going to Envirothon, I know they’re learning something they didn’t know before.”

She said her students have worked hard to prepare for Envirothon.

“I’m proud that we can get students who put the time in,” she said.

Missing from tomorrow’s competition is ten-time consecutive winner G. Ray Bodley High School. The Fulton school is not fielding a team this year. Bodley last won in 2012, but was ousted last year by APW.

“Due to new duties and responsibilities, I relinquished the helm and it just didn’t transfer well for the students,” former GRB Envirothon adviser Dan Mainville told The Valley News in an email. “Sadly there just wasn’t enough interest this year. Maybe next year.”

“We will definitely miss them, but it opens up opportunities for other schools to win,” Schreiner said of Bodley’s absence from the competition.

“It opens the door a little bit for us,” Celeste said. “My students are a little more motivated now because they feel they can be more competitive.”

“There’s always someone to replace Fulton,” Thormann said. “I’m sure there’s someone who wants to knock us off the pedestal. All the teams are tough.”