Category Archives: Oswego News

Learn about Battle of Oswego May 10

Attack on Oswego – From an Old Print. Benson Lossing’s Fieldbook of the War of 1812.
Attack on Oswego – From an Old Print. Benson Lossing’s Fieldbook of the War of 1812.

On Saturday, May 10, Superintendent Paul Lear will lead a walking tour of the 1814 Battle of Oswego at Fort Ontario State Historic Site.

The tour will begin at 1:45 p.m. at the tunnel entrance of the old stone fort. It is free and open to the public. Appropriate footwear and clothing for cooler and windier conditions along the lake are recommended.

Lake Ontario was the main theater of action during the War of 1812, and Oswego was an important forwarding point on the waterborne supply route from New York City to the US Navy shipyard and port at Sackets Harbo.

On May 5 and 6, 1814, a British amphibious force from Kingston, Ontario attacked and captured Fort Ontario and Oswego after a two-day battle. During the walking tour event, Lear will discuss the individuals and units involved, what actions they took, and the results of the battle.

Fort Ontario State Historic Site is located at the north end of East Fourth Street in  Oswego. For more information on Fort Ontario or the walking tour event, call Paul Lear at 343-4711, or email Paul.Lear@parks.ny.gov.

Save time, money by visiting local DMVs

Submitted by Oswego County

Oswego County Clerk Michael C. Backus is encouraging local residents to save time and money by using one of the three local Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) offices for their motor vehicle transactions.

Residents can renew their registrations at DMVs in Pulaski, Oswego and Fulton. Vehicle renewals can be mailed to the Oswego Motor Vehicle Office at 384 E. River Road, Oswego, 13126.

Backus notes that all motorcycle registrations expire April 30.

“When people mail their DMV renewals to the Oswego office, a portion of the fees collected by the DMV remains in Oswego County and helps hold the line on local property taxes,” said Backus.

​Backus said it’s important for local residents to know that if they mail their registration renewal to the Oswego DMV office, they must cover or cross out the postal bar code that is pre-printed on the DMV envelope.

“The envelopes that the DMV sends with the vehicle renewals are pre-printed with the Utica address bar code,” he said. “If the bar code isn’t covered or crossed out, the letter will be delivered to Utica, even if it has an Oswego address on it.”

Oswego County DMV offices are open weekdays from 9 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. and are located at 384 E. River Road, Oswego; 200 N. Second St., Fulton; and 2 Broad St., Pulaski.

For information call 349-8300; 591-9136; or 298-6521.

Nuke siren tests set for week of May 5

Submitted by Oswego County

Dale Currier, director of the Oswego County Emergency Management Office, says the system of emergency notification sirens surrounding the three nuclear power plants at Nine Mile Point are scheduled to be tested Monday, May 5, through Friday, May 9, between 4 and 8 p.m.

The test is a portion of the regular testing program of the Oswego County emergency alert system. This quarterly testing includes individual activation of each siren.

No response by the public is required during these tests. Should an actual event occur during the time of testing, the Emergency Alert System would be activated on radio and TV stations providing directions to members of the public.

The system of sirens and tone-alert weather radios in the 10-mile emergency planning zone surrounding the nuclear power plants at Nine Mile Point is designed to alert residents in the event of an emergency.

Tone-alert weather radios are provided to residences in the 10-mile zone that are out of hearing range of the sirens. A listing of residences eligible for tone-alert weather radios is on file at the Emergency Management Office, 200 N. Second St., Fulton.

During an emergency, the sirens would be sounded for three minutes to alert residents of the area to turn their radios or televisions to local Emergency Alert System (EAS) stations for further information and instructions.

EAS stations are listed in the 2014 “Public Emergency Response Information” calendar that was mailed to residents of the Emergency Planning Zone in January.

The calendar is available online at http://www.oswegocounty.com/emo.shtml. EAS stations are also listed in the yellow pages of local telephone directories.

Anyone who has questions concerning the upcoming siren tests or any aspect of emergency planning may contact the Oswego County Emergency Management Office at 591-9150 or (800) 962-2792.

Red Cross Club raises money in walk/run

As part of the Heroes for the American Red Cross Campaign, the Red Cross Club at SUNY Oswego held a Red Cross 5K Walk/Run out at the campus  March 29. The theme was “Be a Different Kind of Superhero.” Participants were asked to come dress up as their favorite superhero. The club raised $722.84, which included a 50/50 drawing and a bake sale. Pictured are: Lauren Madlin, president of the Red Cross Club; Danielle Hayden, manager of the Oswego County Red Cross; club members, Kaila Booth, Katie Pike, Allison Steel, Sarah Bonaker and Heather Robinson.
As part of the Heroes for the American Red Cross Campaign, the Red Cross Club at SUNY Oswego held a Red Cross 5K Walk/Run out at the campus March 29. The theme was “Be a Different Kind of Superhero.” Participants were asked to come dress up as their favorite superhero. The club raised $722.84, which included a 50/50 drawing and a bake sale. Pictured are: Lauren Madlin, president of the Red Cross Club; Danielle Hayden, manager of the Oswego County Red Cross; club members, Kaila Booth, Katie Pike, Allison Steel, Sarah Bonaker and Heather Robinson.

SUNY Oswego’s Moody receives national award

121010_moody-book_0005Submitted by SUNY Oswego

SUNY Oswego communication studies faculty member Dr. David Moody has received a national award for his work on African-American visual popular culture.

Moody, who has taught since 2010 in the broadcasting and mass communication program, earned the Harry Shaw Award on April 18 for outstanding contributions to the field of African-American popular-culture research at the annual conference of the Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association in Chicago.

“Professor Moody’s work on film and popular visual culture has inspired students and colleagues alike,” the PCA/ACA said in its award citation for Moody, an active member of the organization and presenter at conferences.

“His presence has enlivened our sessions and helped us to chart a direction for future research efforts,” the citation states.

In 2012, Moody published “Political Melodies in the Pews? The Voice of the Black Christian Rapper in the Twenty-first Century Church,” and is nearing publication of a book on black identity in film and television.

His Ph.D. from Bowling Green State University was in American culture studies with emphasis in critical studies in film, media and culture.

At the PCA/ACA conference, Moody presented “Does Sarah Jane Really Have a Color Complex? Black Identity and Self-Esteem: Critique of the Film ‘Imitation of Life,’” a 1959 film, by Douglas Sirk, based on a Fanny Hurst novel that explored issues such as racial prejudice and light-skinned African Americans of that era “passing for white.”

‘Remarkable contribution’

Fritz Messere, dean of the School of Communication, Media and the Arts, said Moody is highly deserving of the PCA/ACA award.

The dean cited Moody’s scholarship, his leadership of the college’s Voices of Diversity program and his efforts in raising the profile of the college’s Lewis B. O’Donnell Media Summit as its lead organizer the past three years, among many other contributions.

“We are delighted to have Dr. Moody on staff,” Messere said. “He is making a remarkable contribution to his field and a remarkable contribution to our understanding and perspective of the importance of black history and culture.”

Jennifer Knapp, chair of communication studies, said that as the Harry Shaw Award recipient, Moody now has the opportunity to “shine an even brighter spotlight on his meaningful contributions to the discipline.”

“Our department is lucky to have a scholar so well-regarded, and who is at the forefront of the intersection between popular culture and African-American culture,” Knapp said.

At SUNY Oswego, Moody — with more than 20 years of experience in Cleveland and Cincinnati television and radio — has taught “Minorities in Film and Television,” “Programs, Programming and Effects” and “Broadcast Sales,” among other courses.

The PCA/ACA award is named for Harry Shaw, who established the African-American culture section of the organization.

Foundation plans first fundraiser

Board members of the VOW Foundation met with Assemblyman Will Barclay, center, during their recent trip to Albany. From left Sarah Gauger, Angela Coville, Barclay, Teresa Woolson and Bonnie Caza. They were lobbying for synthetic drug legislation.
Board members of the VOW Foundation met with Assemblyman Will Barclay, center, during their recent trip to Albany. From left Sarah Gauger, Angela Coville, Barclay, Teresa Woolson and Bonnie Caza. They were lobbying for synthetic drug legislation.

The newly created nonprofit charitable organization, The Victor Orlando Woolson Foundation, Inc. (VOW Foundation) will be holding its first fundraiser from noon to 5 p.m. May 17 at Lighthouse Lanes in Oswego.

“We are starting out small and simple with a chicken barbecue at Lighthouse Lanes in Oswego,” said foundation President Teresa Woolson.

This first fundraiser will be a chicken dinner take-out event. Dinners will include half chicken, salt potatoes, baked beans and a roll — packaged for pick-up.

Free delivery will be available for three or more dinners purchased in the Oswego/Scriba area.

Tickets are $10 and all proceeds will go to the VOW Foundation to be used for education and advocating about synthetic drugs.

Woolson began the foundation and named it for her son who died after using synthetic drugs he bought at a store in Oswego.

Four members of the VOW Foundation Board of Directors recently made a trip to Albany in March to advocate for the proposed legislation regarding Synthetic Drugs, A.6971/S.5401.

Woolson said synthetic drugs continue to be a problem in Oswego County and more educational events are being planned for this year.

For tickets call Woolson at 402-6119 or event chair Karen Perwitz, at 315-256-3455. The VOW Foundation can be found at facebook.com/TheVowFoundationInc or vow-foundation.org.

Hilton resigns from Oswego-Fulton Chamber of Commerce

By Ashley M. Casey

Beth Hilton abruptly resigned her position as executive director of the Greater Oswego-Fulton Chamber of Commerce effective April 29. The board of directors has appointed Nate Emmons as interim executive director.

Emmons, of Oswego, previously served as the Chamber’s operations coordinator until about two months ago. He and his wife, Lisa, own the Mother Earth Baby boutique in Oswego.

Emmons could not provide any details about Hilton’s sudden resignation. Hilton had served as executive director since 2009.

“I don’t know the circumstances around it. I wasn’t made privy to anything surrounding her departure,” Emmons told The Valley News.

Emmons said he left his previous job with the Chamber two months ago to focus on opening a second location of Mother Earth Baby in Watertown.

Now that the store’s second location is running smoothly, the board of directors contacted him to take Hilton’s place while they search for a permanent executive director. Emmons could not provide a timeline or any details on the board’s search.

“I enjoy the Chamber. I believe in the Chamber’s mission and the board thought I could advance that mission. I’ll try to make that happen,” Emmons said. “I’m here to do the absolute best job I can for the Chamber, its members and the community. I can’t be concerned with anything else right now.”

The Greater Oswego-Fulton Chamber of Commerce recently moved to 106 W. Utica St. in Oswego and also has an office at 12 Canalview Mall in Fulton.

Before becoming chamber executive director, Hilton taught a class for University of Phoenix, was general manager of Tanger Factory Outlets, marketing director for the Beaufort Chamber of Commerce and director of sales and marketing for the Wisp Mountain Resort/Hotel.