Category Archives: Oswego News

Matteson joins Steele Law Firm

Cindy Matteson has joined the  Steele Law Firm, P.C. as manager of offices. 

Matteson joins the Oswego-based law firm after many years in the banking and residential real estate lending field as well as experience as a team leader and manager in various small businesses in Upstate New York. 

“We are honored that Ms. Matteson chose to bring her talents to our organization,” said Kimberly Steele, law firm owner. “Ms. Matteson’s experience, work ethic, business sense and passion compliment our talented team as we enter into new markets, and grow professionally with our clients and individually as members of our community.” 

Matteson volunteers for a local animal welfare organization and is a supporter of Humane Farm Animal Care’s Certified Humane Raised and Handled® Program. 

She lives with her family in the Oswego City area. 

The Steele Law Firm, P.C. is a multi-jurisdictional practice with offices throughout the United States that represents clients in commercial litigation, commercial transactions, real estate, construction law and suretyship. 

The Steele Law Firm, P.C. is a New York State Certified Woman-Owned Business Enterprise. 

For additional information on The Steele Law Firm, P.C., contact 216-4721 or visit the website at www.thesteelelawfirm.com. 

SUNY Oswego professor named distinguished teaching professor

Submitted by SUNY Oswego

Dr. Tracy K. Lewis, widely praised for his 30 years inspiring students of Spanish and Portuguese at SUNY Oswego, has earned the rank of distinguished teaching professor, one of the State University of New York system’s highest honors.

“Dr. Lewis is revered among legions of current and former students, many of whom teach Spanish and Portuguese in schools and universities around the world,” wrote SUNY Oswego President Deborah F. Stanley, recommending the rank for Lewis, professor in the department of modern languages and literatures.

“He sets a fine example for others through tireless international service, award-winning performance as a master teacher, advisor and mentor, and his sometimes unconventional yet highly effective approach to teaching that consistently challenges and engages students to whom he is devoted,” Stanley wrote.

Renowned and decorated for his scholarship on the languages and literature of Paraguay, lecturing there and in Brazil and Argentina, Lewis received numerous letters support for his elevation to distinguished rank, conferred May 14 by the SUNY Board of Trustees. 

Among the backers are a well-known Paraguayan poet and a university president in the South American country, colleagues at Oswego and other campuses, and current and former students.

 “I enrolled in an intermediate level Spanish class to simply get my general education requirement completed,” wrote Spanish teacher Mary Ann Reitano. “The professor of that class was Dr. Tracy Lewis and my life would forever be changed.”

SUNY Oswego senior Brianna Carnevale, who aims to be a Spanish teacher, provided vivid examples: “Whether it is ‘walking down the runway’ to practice clothing vocabulary or ‘completing tasks around the classroom’ to practice daily chores, the learning that takes place isn’t copying notes from the board but instead, becoming part of the lesson.”

 ‘Lively, charismatic’

Juan Manuel Marcos, president of Universidad del Norte in Paraguay and a close friend and colleague of Lewis, said, “In his teaching, as I have directly observed it in innumerable classes and lectures in the United States, Paraguay, Argentina and Brazil, Dr. Lewis is a well-prepared, lively, charismatic instructor who not only never bores his students, but also has the capacity to move them to the point of tears.”

As an undergraduate Spanish major at Dartmouth College, Lewis had scarcely given any thought to being a teacher when he became influenced by Dr. John Rassias, now a famous proponent of the Dartmouth Intensive Language Model. 

With the added influence of Robert Russell, another member of Dartmouth’s Spanish faculty, Lewis found himself on a career path with a set of ideas for teaching that encouraged active participation in the languages.

 Constantly experimenting and eager to use theatrical twists, Lewis seeks to create a highly charged classroom atmosphere that gives students the opportunity to create, for example, a mini-society in “the Kingdom of Lewislandia,” a metaphorical approach that immerses students in Spanish or Portuguese as they create provinces and share cultures and viewpoints.

Also a noted scholar, translator and poet, Lewis in 2012 received the Albert Camus Prize, the highest medal bestowed by Paraguay’s Ministry of Education, for his decades-long efforts to focus attention on the country as it made its way out of dictatorship to parliamentary democracy. 

His publications include a highly regarded translation of Marcos’ “El invierno de Gunter” (“Gunter’s Winter”) and books of poetry in Spanish and Guarani, the only indigenous language of the Americas whose speakers include a large proportion of non-indigenous people.

Lewis, whose doctorate is from Brown University, is a past recipient of the college President’s Award for Excellence in Teaching.

More than 1,600 graduate from SUNY Oswego

SUNY Oswego President Deborah F. Stanley addresses graduation candidates of Oswego’s School of Education on Saturday, in the third of three sessions of commencement at the Campus Center arena and convocation hall. Seated in the red robe, Dr. Linda Clement, 1971 alumna of SUNY Oswego and vice president of student affairs at University of Maryland, served as commencement speaker for education. As the college conferred degrees on more than 1,600 undergraduates and master’s candidates, Peter Bocko, class of 1975 and chief technology officer for Corning Inc.’s Glass Technologies Group, spoke at commencement for the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Mark Baum, a 1981 Oswego graduate and senior vice president of industry relations and chief collaboration officer for the Food Marketing Institute, addressed candidates in the School of Business and the School of Communication, Media and the Arts. To read the text of the commencement speakers’ remarks, visit oswego.edu/academics/commencement.
SUNY Oswego President Deborah F. Stanley addresses graduation candidates of Oswego’s School of Education on Saturday, in the third of three sessions of commencement at the Campus Center arena and convocation hall. Seated in the red robe, Dr. Linda Clement, 1971 alumna of SUNY Oswego and vice president of student affairs at University of Maryland, served as commencement speaker for education. As the college conferred degrees on more than 1,600 undergraduates and master’s candidates, Peter Bocko, class of 1975 and chief technology officer for Corning Inc.’s Glass Technologies Group, spoke at commencement for the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Mark Baum, a 1981 Oswego graduate and senior vice president of industry relations and chief collaboration officer for the Food Marketing Institute, addressed candidates in the School of Business and the School of Communication, Media and the Arts. To read the text of the commencement speakers’ remarks, visit oswego.edu/academics/commencement.

Rotary learns about Fresh Air Fund

Representatives from The Fresh Air Fund were guests of Oswego Rotary recently where they presented information on the Fresh Air program. Fresh Air children are boys and girls, from six to 18 years old, who live in New York City. Each summer two or three buses head to the Oswego County area, with 30-40 children per bus, to spend a week or more with a host family. Children are hosted by families in 13 states currently giving inner city children an experience they will never forget. For more information on the program contact Kathy Froio at 695-5502 or Kathy.froio@friendlytown.org.  Picture are, left to right, Kathy Froio and Liz Claycomb from the Fresh Air program and Oswego Rotary President Sue Witmer
Representatives from The Fresh Air Fund were guests of Oswego Rotary recently where they presented information on the Fresh Air program. Fresh Air children are boys and girls, from six to 18 years old, who live in New York City. Each summer two or three buses head to the Oswego County area, with 30-40 children per bus, to spend a week or more with a host family. Children are hosted by families in 13 states currently giving inner city children an experience they will never forget. For more information on the program contact Kathy Froio at 695-5502 or Kathy.froio@friendlytown.org. Picture are, left to right, Kathy Froio and Liz Claycomb from the Fresh Air program and Oswego Rotary President Sue Witmer

Police blotter

Oswego County Sheriff’s Office

Angele M. Newman, 24, of County Route 4, Oswego, NY was arrested based on a felony bench warrant issued out of the city of Oswego charging her with criminal possession of a forged instrument third degree and criminal possession of a controlled substance seventh degree stemming from a 2012 incident. Newman has been sent to Oswego County Drug Court.

Benjamin E. Phetteplace, 39, and Charles D. Strauss III, 41, both of New Floyd Road, Rome, were charged with burglary, a felony, and misdemeanor counts of petit larceny and criminal mischief. Deputies say they entered a residence in Constantia on Jan. 25 and stole some Harley Davidson merchandise along with a pocket knife.

Raymond L. Besaw, 39, of Harris Hill Road, Hannibal, was charged with three counts of criminal sale of a firearm third degree, all felonies. Deputies say he allegedly gave three different firearms to people in the town of Granby while not being authorized to possess any firearms due to a previous felony conviction. Besaw was arraigned in the Granby Town Court and will return to court June 2.

Dustin L. Vanburen, 25, of Hickory Grove Drive, Mexico, was charged with criminal contempt first degree, a felony. Deputies say Vanburen got into a domestic dispute in the parking lot of a business in the village of Mexico where he allegedly engaged in a verbal altercation with the victim. He was not supposed to be near this victim because there is an active order of protection filed against him. Vanburen was arraigned in Mexico Town Court and will return to court May 20.

Damon M. Wing, 18, of Rochester Street, Hannibal, was arrested at the Oswego County Correctional Facility based on a felony bench warrant issued out of the Hannibal Town Court charging him with failure to appear. He was arraigned in Granby Town Court and will return to court May 20.

Fulton police

Bruce M. Christian II, 27, of Didama Street, Syracuse was charged with criminal sale of a controlled substance third degree and criminal possession of a controlled substance fifth degree, both felonies. Police say in Fulton, he possessed and knowingly sold a white substance to a female. The substance tested positive as cocaine.

Tyler J. Hobart, no age given, of Ontario Street, Fulton, was charged with reckless endangerment and criminal mischief third degree, a felony. Police say on May 7, he punched the passenger rear window of a person’s car, breaking the window and that he also threw a heavy metal cylinder object through the front driver side window, breaking the window and nearly hitting the victim. The damage was about $300.

 Andrea L. Spears, no age given, of West Fifth Street, Fulton, was charged with grand larceny, a felony, and criminal possession of a controlled substance seventh degree, a misdemeanor. Police say on May 7, while at the YMCA, she removed a key fob from a gym bag in the locker room and used that key fob to enter a car in the parking lot that did not belong to her.

From the car she took two rings and later was found in possession of these rings. Police also said when she was arrested, she was possessing 17 green pills in a plastic bag which were found to be Clonazepam, a controlled substance. These pills were not prescribed to her.

 Thomas C. Clark, no age given, of West Fifth Street, Fulton, was charged with criminal mischief third degree, a felony. Police said on March 13 in Fulton, he punched the windshield of a car, breaking it, resulting in $375.41 damage.

OCO installs new board officers

Executive Director of Oswego County Opportunities Diane Cooper-Currier, right, announced the installation of the new slate of officers for OCO’s board of directors at OCO’s annual meeting April 23 at Springside at Seneca Hill. From left are: Vice President Debra Turner; Treasurer Ron Darrow; Board President, Connie Cosemento; Secretary, Terry Bennett; Past President, Joe Caruana; and Diane Cooper-Currier.
Executive Director of Oswego County Opportunities Diane Cooper-Currier, right, announced the installation of the new slate of officers for OCO’s board of directors at OCO’s annual meeting April 23 at Springside at Seneca Hill. From left are: Vice President Debra Turner; Treasurer Ron Darrow; Board President, Connie Cosemento; Secretary, Terry Bennett; Past President, Joe Caruana; and Diane Cooper-Currier.