Category Archives: Columnists

In and Around Hannibal: Quilt of Valor

Kerry Barnes, NYS Guild coordinator, presented the Rev. Moritz Fuchs with a Quilt of Valor this past Sunday following Mass at Our Lady of the Rosary. Mass was celebrated by the Rev. John Smegelsky and Deacon Phillip Kehoe. The quilt was made for Father Fuchs by the Sugar House Quilters of Crocketts. Members who worked on the quilt are Jean Derby, Shirley King, Peggy Griffin, Rita Pavo, Lois Radomski, Martha Sage, Cinda Shupe, Bonnie Thompson, Marylou Brower, Lillian Foster and Linda Leach. Pictured from left are Shirley King, Fuchs, Kerry Barnes, Jean Derby and Deacon Kehoe.
Kerry Barnes, NYS Guild coordinator, presented the Rev. Moritz Fuchs with a Quilt of Valor this past Sunday following Mass at Our Lady of the Rosary. Mass was celebrated by the Rev. John Smegelsky and Deacon Phillip Kehoe. The quilt was made for Father Fuchs by the Sugar House Quilters of Crocketts. Members who worked on the quilt are Jean Derby, Shirley King, Peggy Griffin, Rita Pavo, Lois Radomski, Martha Sage, Cinda Shupe, Bonnie Thompson, Marylou Brower, Lillian Foster and Linda Leach. Pictured from left are Shirley King, Fuchs, Kerry Barnes, Jean Derby and Deacon Kehoe.

Have you ever heard of a Quilt of Valor?

I hadn’t until last week when Jean Derby called me and told me that one was going to be presented to a special somebody in Hannibal…but it was a secret and I was not to tell.

Well the secret’s out, so now I can tell. The recipient of the Quilt of Valor is the Rev. Moritz Fuchs, Fulton native and a dear man, dear to the hearts of many throughout Central New York and especially to those parishioners of Our Lady of the Rosary in Hannibal. Continue reading

Historical Fulton, N.Y.: L.P. Smith Co.

This photo from 1923 shows the L.P. Smith Co., at 8-13 S. First St., Fulton. The store was the outgrowth of a business founded about 1860 called Case, Wooden & Conger. That was succeeded by Wooden & Conger and then J.H. Wooden became the sole proprietor. The next change was to Snow & Loomis and later the title became the Fulton Hardware Co. Finally, in 1911, the designation of L.P. Smith Co. was adopted. One writeup about the store said it was of unusual length, practically double that of other stores in the city. An ad on fultonhistory.com for the company told of an “Unprecedented Paint Sale” after the firm bought a thousand gallons of Crown Paint. Gallons sold for $1.85, half gallons for 95 cents and quarts for 50 cents. “Largest Stock of Paint Supplies in the City of Fulton” the ad claims. Photo courtesy of fultonhistory.com
This photo from 1923 shows the L.P. Smith Co., at 8-13 S. First St., Fulton. The store was the outgrowth of a business founded about 1860 called Case, Wooden & Conger. That was succeeded by Wooden & Conger and then J.H. Wooden became the sole proprietor. The next change was to Snow & Loomis and later the title became the Fulton Hardware Co. Finally, in 1911, the designation of L.P. Smith Co. was adopted. One writeup about the store said it was of unusual length, practically double that of other stores in the city. An ad on fultonhistory.com for the company told of an “Unprecedented Paint Sale” after the firm bought a thousand gallons of Crown Paint. Gallons sold for $1.85, half gallons for 95 cents and quarts for 50 cents. “Largest Stock of Paint Supplies in the City of Fulton” the ad claims.
Photo courtesy of fultonhistory.com

When to get involved if you suspect pet abuse

Dear Porky  & Buddy,

My neighbor has a dog that he keeps tied out behind his house. I can barely see into his backyard, but as far as I can tell the dog spends most of its time out there and there is never any food or water for it.

Is it OK if I just go over there and feed and water the dog myself when he is not home? The yard is not posted or anything.

Donna

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