Category Archives: Columnists

Historical Fulton, N.Y.: Oswego County Medical Society

This photo shows a gathering from the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Oswego County Medical Society. A good-looking collection of doctors, a couple of nurses and even a dog posed for the photo. According to the 1895 Landmark’s Book of Oswego County, “laws then governing the admission and practice of physicians were substantially worthless; but in 1806 the state Legislature passed an act repealing former laws applying to this profession, and authorizing a general State Medical Society and County Societies. Under the provisions of this act, the Medical Society of the County of Oswego was organized June 9, 1821, at the school-house in Oswego village, with Benjamin Coe in the chair, and Luther Cowan, secretary.” The book states early records of this society were twice destroyed by fire, leaving little record of one of the oldest organizations in the county. Among its original members were Anson Fay and Luther Cowan, of Volney; Allen Andrews, of Pulaski; Stephen F. Kinney, of New Haven; Sardius Brewster, of Mexico; Benjamin Coe, of Oswego; J. Gurnsey, Dr. Gridley and possible others. The first officers of the society were Benjamin Coe, president; Stephen F. Kinney, vice president; Luther Cowan, secretary; Anson Fay, treasurer; J. Gurnsey, Luther Cowan, and Anson Fay, censors.  The second meeting was held at the house of Ezra May on the first Tuesday in June, 1822. Today, the county still has its own medical society, but it is managed by a combined group based in New Hartford, Oneida County, called the Medical Society of the Counties of Oneida, Herkimer, Madison, Chenango, Oswego, Cayuga and St. Lawrence. There are 39 members of the Oswego County society. Photo courtesy fultonhistory.com
This photo shows a gathering from the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Oswego County Medical Society. A good-looking collection of doctors, a couple of nurses and even a dog posed for the photo. According to the 1895 Landmark’s Book of Oswego County, “laws then governing the admission and practice of physicians were substantially worthless; but in 1806 the state Legislature passed an act repealing former laws applying to this profession, and authorizing a general State Medical Society and County Societies. Under the provisions of this act, the Medical Society of the County of Oswego was organized June 9, 1821, at the school-house in Oswego village, with Benjamin Coe in the chair, and Luther Cowan, secretary.” The book states early records of this society were twice destroyed by fire, leaving little record of one of the oldest organizations in the county. Among its original members were Anson Fay and Luther Cowan, of Volney; Allen Andrews, of Pulaski; Stephen F. Kinney, of New Haven; Sardius Brewster, of Mexico; Benjamin Coe, of Oswego; J. Gurnsey, Dr. Gridley and possible others. The first officers of the society were Benjamin Coe, president; Stephen F. Kinney, vice president; Luther Cowan, secretary; Anson Fay, treasurer; J. Gurnsey, Luther Cowan, and Anson Fay, censors. The second meeting was held at the house of Ezra May on the first Tuesday in June, 1822. Today, the county still has its own medical society, but it is managed by a combined group based in New Hartford, Oneida County, called the Medical Society of the Counties of Oneida, Herkimer, Madison, Chenango, Oswego, Cayuga and St. Lawrence. There are 39 members of the Oswego County society.
Photo courtesy fultonhistory.com

Poetry Corner

The Curve of the Moon

By Jim Farfaglia

On nights like this,
when more than the sky is dark,
I love how you lean back
and offer me your lap.

There I sit, watching, as the stars
answer my uneasy questions;
watching, as one gracefully
falls from grace.

And in this waning moment,
I find your age-old wisdom
that comes and goes,
pausing long enough to say,

“Nothing stays forever full,
but, then again,
nobody ever completely
fades away.”

Historical Fulton, N.Y.: Sealright

This photo from fultonhistory.com shows the old Sealright Co. factory along with a collection of some of the bottle caps made at the plant through the years. Sealright was founded in 1883 by Forrest Weeks as the Oswego Falls Pulp and Paper Co. in Fulton. One of its early major products was newsprint for newspapers. Then, when the company acquired the rights to a new cylindrical paper container with sanitary properties that could be used for dairy products like cottage cheese and ice cream, the ‘Sealrights’ were born. This line of products was so successful that Oswego incorporated a subsidiary of the company called Sealright in 1917. In 1921, the company introduced its first milk container. In the 1940s, it became a publicly traded company and in the 1960s it became associated with Phillips Petroleum. It was purchased by Huhtamaki in 1998. Photo courtesy fultonhistory.com
This photo from fultonhistory.com shows the old Sealright Co. factory along with a collection of some of the bottle caps made at the plant through the years. Sealright was founded in 1883 by Forrest Weeks as the Oswego Falls Pulp and Paper Co. in Fulton. One of its early major products was newsprint for newspapers. Then, when the company acquired the rights to a new cylindrical paper container with sanitary properties that could be used for dairy products like cottage cheese and ice cream, the ‘Sealrights’ were born. This line of products was so successful that Oswego incorporated a subsidiary of the company called Sealright in 1917. In 1921, the company introduced its first milk container. In the 1940s, it became a publicly traded company and in the 1960s it became associated with Phillips Petroleum. It was purchased by Huhtamaki in 1998.
Photo courtesy fultonhistory.com

In and Around Hannibal: More about Hannibal Methodist Church

This Sunday marks the 175th Anniversary of the Hannibal Methodist Church.

The celebration will begin at 11 a.m. at Firemen’s Field on Rochester Street with an old fashioned revival meeting. Following there will be a picnic. Dress as you might have 175 years ago for church.

The day promises to be one filled with music and fun for everyone. Join them as they celebrate this milestone in the Hannibal Community. I hope to be there! Continue reading