Category Archives: Columnists

Light In The Darkness: Walk By Faith, Not By Sight

By Pastor David M. Grey

Mount Pleasant United
Methodist Church

“God saw all that he had made, and it was very good. And there was evening, and there was morning — the sixth day. Thus the heavens and the earth were completed in all their vast array.

By the seventh day God had finished the work he had been doing; so on the seventh day he rested from all his work. And God blessed the seventh day and made it holy, because on it he rested from all the work of creating that he had done.”

               Genesis 1:31-2:3

In my last column I referred to the first verse in Genesis, which reads, “In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.” I then pointed out that at its very heart, Biblical faith is simply the act of believing what God has said. In the passage that follows that first verse in scripture, we read the order in which God created everything culminating in the verses cited above.

God says that He created everything in six days, even stressing the fact that each one of those days began in the morning and concluded at evening. Why do so many doubt that this is true? Even among Christians, we find many going to great lengths to show that the word “day” means something other than a 24-hour day as we know it.

For the rest of this column, pick up the print version of The Valley News.

Jerry’s Journal

Editor’s note: Due to an editing error, a copy of an advertisement was left out of Saturday’s Jerry’s Journal. Below is the ad, along with information about it from Jerry. The Valley News regrets the omission. 

By Jerry Kasperek

Please note the accompanying advertisement. It’s where Mike and I bought our first car, a maroon, 1949 Plymouth two-door coupe. It was in 1954, and what a bargain: we paid $800 for it!

OP Jerry 8-3

The Sportsman’s World: Seasons

By Leon Archer

This is the time of year that I start to wonder where the summer has gone even though all of August lies before us. Have you ever stopped to think for a moment about how much our lives are influenced by the seasons? And it’s not just our lives, but the lives of just about all the plant and animal life on this planet of ours. From the tropics to the poles we all move to the rhythm of a drum we cannot hear. It’s the music of life and death and life again.

The ancient learned observers of the heavens noted that the night sky was filled with the ever moving stars and the constellations marching from horizon to horizon. With simple implements, they calculated the daily rising sun as it appeared and climbed at a slightly different angle each morning, noting the relationship to what was happening in their world.

For the rest of the story, read the Valley News Saturday edition.

Light In The Darkness

By Pastor David Grey

“In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.” — Genesis 1:1

I have long marveled at the wisdom of God expressed in this brief opening verse of the Bible. He states the truth and leaves it there, offering no lengthy argument. He offers no list of supporting proofs. Indeed, what higher proof could be possible than the Word of the Living Creator, Himself? He simply says, “In the beginning I created everything” and the reader must take that at face value. And, in fact, the reader’s response to that statement demonstrates whether he or she has faith or does not.

For the rest of the story, read the Valley News Saturday edition.

Jerry’s Journal

By Jerry Kasperek

Did you ever watch hummingbirds come to feed? Ours come one by one, all sizes and all colors – red, green and blue – to sip the sweet sugary syrup Ed makes for their bird feeder. Some of our hummingbirds perch, yes, actually perch their tiny selves on a nearby shepherd’s crook as if to wait for their turn at the feeder. I never saw a hummingbird perch until last summer when I did a double-take to see one actually sitting there.

Such sweet little things, I thought. Or not! The little devils dive bomb one another trying to get to the feeder before the other one does!

For the rest of the story, read the Valley News Saturday edition.

Hodgepodge: A Tribute to Muriel Allerton

Muriel Allerton, 93, one of Fulton’s most popular and respected citizens, died July 25 following an extended illness. She was a community icon, one of its most active and enthusiastic residents.

In 2010, she was welcomed to Albany by then Senator Darrel Aubertine and honored as a New York State Senate Woman of Distinction for years of exemplary service to her community. Sen. Aubertine said, “Muriel came to Central New York close to 50 years ago and over that time has certainly made her presence known. She truly is a woman of distinction and a pioneer in this community as the first woman mayor of Fulton. She is the type of person who makes friends for life shopping at the corner store and can convey a wealth of experience in the advice she gives.”

For the rest of the story, read the Valley News Saturday edition.

Hoarding

by Leon Archer

If you are under the age of 70, you have probably known people who were adults during the Great Depression, and if you are very much older than 70 you actually experienced at least the end of it. The Depression created an excessive number of hoarders, and you may have chuckled about the things they would save and squirrel away besides just money.

There have always been hoarders; it’s just a natural thing, and a little of it is good. We all like to put a little something away for a rainy day, but hoarders put away things for a rainy decade or more.

I have recently come to realize that I am a hoarder. No, I don’t save balls of string and rubber bands, bent nails, rusty washers, years of newspapers and magazines, worn out clothes, and all the other things the hard core hoarders hold onto, but I’m a hoarder just the same. I just have a hard time parting with my own kind of items.

A lot of animals are hoarders. Squirrels, mice, and many other rodents gather and store nuts and seeds for the winter, but they usually end up putting away a lot more than they can actually use. That’s the way a lot of trees in the forests got their start. Then there are pack rats; they haul away and store all sorts of items that they don’t need and have no real use for

I guess that’s why some of us are called pack rats. Sweet Thing and I have been cleaning house and getting rid of things we have stored without using sometimes for decades. Man, I am a pack rat. The funny thing about all of this is that there are a lot of items that I sort out into piles for various methods of removal from our premises, about which I can’t help thinking, “I might need that.”

To read the rest of the column, pick up a copy of The Valley News or subscribe by calling 598-06397