Category Archives: Columnists

The Sportsman’s World: America’s Bird

By Leon Archer

When I was 16, no one in New York state that I knew talked about hunting wild turkeys unless they were referring to the Pilgrims and Indians.

Wild turkeys no longer gobbled in the forests of our state, and had not done so for a long time before I was born. Early New Yorkers had killed them all off by the mid-1800s.

If anyone had told me when I was in high school that we would be hunting wild turkeys in Oswego County in my lifetime, I would have thought they were more than a bit daft.

It hadn’t always been that way. When the early colonists came to the New World, turkeys were abundant. Those early immigrants called the big birds turkeys, probably because they resembled another bird they were familiar with back in the Old Country, the turkey fowl.

The turkey fowl was a bird that had been imported from Turkey, thus the name. Colonists quickly dropped the fowl part of the name and they became simply turkeys.

There were no seasons, and turkeys were hunted and eaten year round. Eventually this practice reduced the substantial turkey population to a small remnant all across the Eastern United States.

It was fortunate that in states to our south a few scattered flocks had managed to hold out in inaccessible areas. States like Pennsylvania, Kentucky, and others, protected the remnant flocks and in the early 1950s, they hit upon the idea of trapping and transferring birds to areas in their state where they had historically existed.

It worked even better than the biologists and wildlife managers had dared to hope. The transferred birds thrived and quickly expanded their range on their own once they were given the opportunity.

Turkeys began to wander across the Pennsylvania border into the Alleghany and Catskill areas of New York state in the mid 1950s, and from the flocks established by those feathered colonizers, our present day flocks were also established through an ambitious program of trap and transfer.

It has been an astonishing transformation, and a welcome one to sportsmen and New Yorkers in general. Who doesn’t enjoy seeing our magnificent wild turkeys?

I suppose most people are familiar with the story that Benjamin Franklin wanted our national bird to be the Wild Turkey instead of the bald headed eagle. It’s not just a story, it’s actually true.

He wrote about it, and the written record of his suggestion remains. He felt while the turkey was colorful, wild, useful, wary, and industrious, and in many ways reflected the American people and spirit, the eagle was, after all, a scavenger, and therefor hardly worthy to represent us as a nation. Fortunately or unfortunately, depending on one’s view, the eagle won out.

Turkey hunting has become a very popular sport in New York state, as it has in almost every state in our nation today. Whether one gets a turkey or not, being out in the fields and woods this time of year is rewarding in itself – at least it is to me.

Everything is so fresh and alive. Wildlife abounds and there is a multitude of songbirds preparing to nest and raise their young. I hate getting up early in the morning, but a morning afield in search of a big tom makes getting out of that warm bed while others are still asleep all worthwhile.

I hope all you turkey hunters appreciate what you have today. Enjoy the world around you and the chance to harvest a wonderful bird.

Some of you have no doubt already taken a bird, or perhaps you have taken two and ended your spring season, but successful or not, it’s a great time to be alive and afield.

Remember to give thanks.

In and Around Hannibal

By Rita Hooper

As I write this week’s column, the rain is falling and from what the news tells me, it’s going to be raining for a couple of days.

I’m reminded of Al Jolson’s old song:

Though April showers may come your way,

They bring the flowers that bloom in May.

So if it’s raining, have no regrets,

Because it isn’t raining rain, you know, (It’s raining violets,)

And where you see clouds upon the hills,

You soon will see crowds of daffodils,

So keep on looking for a blue bird, And list’ning for his song,

Whenever April showers come along.

***************************

The day you have been waiting for has finally arrived. But then you knew that!

You are probably sitting down, getting around to reading the paper about 5 p.m.  Saturday afternoon. You’ve had a busy day both holding your own garage sale and sneaking time to visit the other sales in town.

Isn’t it funny, how we clear out our junk so we can buy our neighbor’s junk and fill up all the space we just created?  Oh, you don’t do that? Come on … I can see your nose growing!

Just in case, you’re reading this while having your morning jo, get out of your PJs and into your jogging outfit and start hitting the sales — it’s Community Yardsale Day.

You can pick up the list at the Senior Center in the Hannibal Library on Oswego Street. There are 25 sales listed! The sales start at 8 a.m. Make sure to give a look-see at the Elderberry Sale when you pick up your list.

The Hannibal Methodist Church began its sale yesterday, and will be holding a bag sale today. That’s on Route 3, 1 block west of the Village Square.

This is really a fun day in Hannibal…bringing the community together as neighbors get to see each other, even sit and chat for the first time after a long, long winter. I’ll be praying for a nice, warm, sunny day.

The Mother and Daughter Banquet for the Hannibal United Methodist Church will be held at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, May 8. Reservations were due to Ulah Baker, 564-6376 by May 1; if you haven’t made your reservation, call right away and maybe she can wave her magic wand and get you in!

Hannibal Democrats will host a chicken barbecue at noon Sunday May 4 at the American Legion on Rochester Street.  To purchase pre-sale tickets, call 564-5630.

I received notice this week from Mayor Fred Kent that beginning about 7 a.m. Monday, May 5, one of the town trucks will be making the rounds in the village to pick up bagged leaves and twigs and other growing things. I don’t think children are included! There just is no rest for the weary!

The Senior Meals Program meets Monday, Wednesday and Friday for lunch at the Senior Center promptly at noon. The Center opens at 10 for those who like to work on puzzles, read the paper or just have a chat over coffee.

The center is located in the Library across from the Hannibal Fire Hall on Oswego Street.

This week’s menu features:

  • Monday, May 5:  Homemade soup and sandwich, juice, fruit cocktail
  • Wednesday: Italian sausage with onions and peppers on roll, green beans, potato salad, pudding
  • Friday: Fish, Monterey potatoes, vegetable blend, juice, peaches
  • Activities: Monday — Wii bowling and games; Wednesday — Bingo after lunch;   Friday — Music with Deanna Hubbard

The Jammers start up Monday, May 5 with a covered dish dinner beginning at 6 p.m. at the American Legion on Rochester Street. in Hannibal.  Bring a dish to pass, the table service will be provided.  The Jam begins at 7.

There’s always room for more musicians, so if you play a fiddle, guitar, harmonica, washboard, sing or yodel, mark the Jammers on your calendar. They meet every Monday night at 7 at the Legion from now until that white stuff that falls from the sky gets to bothersome to deal with!

Heard from Keith that he found a harmonica jam in Florida this winter.  If I remember right, he said that there were about 40 of them that got together just to play harmonica!

Last call for Church World Service Kits – If you have some kits and would like to get them on the truck from Central New York going to the Brethren Center in Maryland, give Rita Hooper a call at 706-3564 and make arrangements to drop them in Fulton.  The truck is being packed on May 6.

Hannibal Sports Boosters meet at 7 p.m. Monday at the high school.

Hannibal Chapter of Families with Attention Deficit Disorder meets from 7 to 9 p.m. Monday at Kenney Middle School libarry.

Bone Builders meet at the American Legion Tuesdays and Thursdays at 9:45 a.m.

Home and School will meet at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday May 6 in room 30 at Fairley.

The Hannibal Methodist Church serves a free lunch (donations for this ministry accepted though) at 11:30 a.m. Thursdays. The church is one block west of the Village Square on Route 3 (Church Street).

The Hannibal Town Board meets at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Municipal Building on Cayuga Street.

Hannibal Dollar for Scholars will hold a pulled pork barbecue from noon until sold out Saturday, May 10.

May 10, the  North Volney Methodist Church, (corner of County Routes 4 and  6 in Volney) will be hosting a gospel concert featuring the Misfits and Lake Effect Bluegrass from 1 to 3 p.m. They will also have a used book sale from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., a plant sale, bake sale and lunch will be available too. The concert is free; a free will offering will be received to pay the musicians.

The public hearing on the proposed Hannibal school budget for 2014-15 will be at 6:30 p.m. May 12 in the board room in the high school.

I was surprised to read in the Valley News that there is no contest for two seats on the Hannibal Board of Education.

I know my memory isn’t as good as it once was, but I can’t remember when the last uncontested race was held. I do remember some pretty hard fought races in the past though.

Along these lines, School Superintendent Donna Fountain will attend the next meeting of the Elderberries at 6 p.m. May 13 to present the school budget and other information. The Berries meet at the Senior Center (Library,) Oswego Street. Bring your own table service and dish to pass.

The Friends of the Library have a new raffle basket called Just Frogin’ Around, all things frog. Includes a fountain, garden ornament, calculator, wrapping paper and more. The drawing is May 13.

Plans are underway for the Hannibal Alumni Banquet June 14. This year it will be held at the Elks Lodge on Pierce Drive in Fulton. Watch for posters for reservation information.

Plans are underway for the fourth annual SOS Music Fest this summer in Hannibal. For information, call Erik at 564-6133.

Rita Hooper 706-3564

Twohoops2@juno.com

Jerry’s Journal: Papergirls, reader feedback, and Fulton Memoirs

By Jerry Hogan Kasperek 

Do you remember when we used to have paperboys? And papergirls!

According to Gerry Garbus, young ladies back in her day were considered “too fragile” to deliver newspapers. But, they could do the job anyway — if they took a boy’s name — she said, which worked out good for her because of her name being Gerry!

She stopped by the other day with an old newspaper clipping featuring a photo of 23 (I counted them) long-ago paperboys and papergirls holding turkeys in a Thanksgiving give-away.

The distributor at the time was Herald Taylor, she said. It was Nov. 27, 1944.

The newspaper was the Herald Journal. I bet you remember it, the afternoon newspaper that was unbundled and gathered up by ambitious boys and girls, mostly in their early teens.

They could be seen on our sidewalks after school, in all kinds of weather, a big strap over their slender shoulders, toting the heavy Herald Journal bags made of gray cloth and filled with multi-page newspapers that were delivered right to your doorstep so your parents (and you in later years) could catch up with the latest news at dinnertime.

All for a dime or a quarter tip a week — you say, you got to be kidding!

Gerry Garbus was the serious-looking young lady with dark hair, on the right side near the back row, of the photo. She said my late husband Mike Hogan was a newspaper boy, too. But I don’t find his face in the crowd in the clipping.

I did spot a couple of other familiar faces, though: Bob Jones, Fred Sumner — some faces never change — and one of the Misch boys, I think might be Claude.

Mary Ann Buell, Don Quade, and a Lanzafame, perhaps it was Sal, Gerry said, were also in the picture. Who else is lost in memory.

I wish I could reproduce that old and faded news clipping for this column, but for obvious reasons I cannot. It sure provokes a lot of good memories for you and me, anyhow, thanks to Gerry Garbus.

I received a delightful email from Jim Kring who wrote: “Hi Jerry, greetings from Jacksonville, Florida. One of the modes of transportation Walt Carrington did not represent for your March 22nd Journal was ‘bumper skating.”

“Back in the day, when on foot (of course you were) and you wanted to get up West First Street, at the light at Broadway and First you could catch a ride by grabbing at the rear bumper (there were bumpers then) of a turning car, crouching down and skating on your feet.

“Of course, it was easier and safer in the winter,” (Jim included tongue-in-cheek computer generated smiley faces) “when the roads were snow/ice covered, the roads were plowed, but not sanded.

“It was important not to choose cars with chains on because they could get more speed than you wanted, certainly wouldn’t want them to be unsafe,” he said!

“If you weren’t careful, your trip would be part skating, part cartwheels!

“All who have done this, raise your hand. You know who you are!’”

Hey, back at you, Jim, thanks for sharing how it was way back when we were kids! (As I have mentioned in many columns before, my family, the McKinneys, lived nest door to the Krings on West First Street many years ago. But I’m sure Jim doesn’t remember it because he was just a toddler when we moved to the east side.)

I received yet another Internet posting from former Fultonian Walter Carrington as well. He said he noticed in the Valley News the write up about Aldi’s coming to Fulton and pointed out its plus and minuses — which I will leave to you, Dear Readers, to decide for yourselves!

He also noticed in that same issue, a picture of Judge Wally Auser. “In the background is a grandfather clock,” Walt wrote. “I’m willing to bet a used typewriter ribbon that the brand of the clock is Emperor and that ‘da judge’ made the clock from a kit.

“We were neighbors and I liked the job he did with the clock so well I bought a kit and made one too. Me thinks he donated it to the Commons when he moved there.”

Walt concluded his email by asking “if there wasn’t a school named Walradt and the box company named Mengle?”

The answers to his questions are yes, and yes.

The box company was off State Route 481, out in back of McDonalds’s, and was indeed called Mengle’s. Many people were once employed there.

I thank Walt Carrington for his ever interesting, on-going Internet conversations.

As for the old Walradt Street School, its existence was addressed in my last column per an email from Tony Leotta — who has since added to his recollections thusly:

“Thank you for recognizing Walradt Street and St. Mary’s schools in your most recent Jerry’s Journal,” he wrote. “Another star student at Phillips Street School was Eleanor Roach (Ellie Pryor — a sweetheart). I should have mentioned that our classmate Sal Tomarcio attended Phillips Street following graduation from the country school in Bowen’s Corners.

“I’m not sure where Morris Sorbello attended elementary school. Morris, Sal and I paled around together at “Good Old Fulton High, mainly because our families were all muck farmers.

“Sal retired a few years ago as an accountant with the federal government and currently resides at his homestead on Route 176 near Bowens Corners. He reads Jerry’s Journal regularly. Morris continues as a highly successful muck farmer and county legislator from Granby.”

I thank Tony Leotta once again for recounting his memories for us. Upon his retirement soon from City Engineer/Zoning Administrator for the City of Oswego, he says he “Intends to tend his fig tree in Oswego and the chestnut tree in Granby.”

Well, dear readers, before I turn off my computer on this particular column, I want to tell you that I am most excited about taking part of  the Fulton Public Library’s “Fulton Memoirs Project” coordinated by Jim Farfaglia.

The library’s latest project is to “capture the best of Fulton by having people who have lived, worked and attended school here, write a memory or two about their experiences.”

My focus will be on my four years at Good Old Fulton High School and I will tell you more about it next time.

Meanwhile, if you are interested in taking part, please contact Jim Farfaglia at his home: 402-2297, or through his email sjim90@twcny.rr.com.

Now here’s my caveat: Readers beware! I write for fun. I am not a historian, nor a reporter. I write from memory and from what others want to share. Sometimes I look things up; sometimes I mess things up. I hope you have fun reading my stuff.

Your comments, additions and corrections are always welcome. You may contact me at 133 Tannery Lane, Fulton, phone 592-7580 or email JHogan808@aol.com.

Please put Jerry’s Journal in the subject line. Thanks!

Hodgepodge: Sixth-grade memories

Remembering

It’s true: when you start remembering and thinking about things that happened in years past, it is hard to stop. And that’s what I found myself doing one day this past week.

I was thinking about my teachers when I went to McKinley Elementary School, and the organized thinker that I am (insert muffled chuckle here), I started at the beginning and kept going, from my first teacher on.

My kindergarten teacher was Mrs. Salmon (that sounds fishy – maybe it was Mrs. Sammons – that sounds better).  I remember Mrs. Tierney, Mrs. Hart, Miss Colbert, Miss (or was it Mrs.) Carrigan, and a few others.

One thing I am sure of – all of my teachers in elementary school were women.

One of the few men on the McKinley School staff was Mr. George. (Not Mr. George Something, but Mr. Something George). Mr. George was our principal.

Mr. George was a pleasant, friendly man and I liked him most of the time. The one time that I didn’t like him so much was the afternoon that I was introduced to his paddle.

That afternoon Mr. George took his paddle off the nail on his office wall and used it for a couple of whacks on my behind. Those were the days when corporal punishment was allowed in the principal’s office.

I had been turned in after I threw a snowball at one of the little girl crossing guards on the way back to school after lunch.

That episode aside, Mr. George was an interesting principal and I liked him. He raised bees and brought some of them to school. He showed them to us at assemblies, along with little jars of their product, which we could buy.

Mr. George was also a talented film maker. He directed and filmed a cinematic masterpiece called “The Haunted Schoolhouse,” which featured our school building and its janitors in a Halloween tale shown every year to classroom after classroom of McKinley students.

There were a couple of other men at McKinley School. They included two janitors and also a gym teacher who came to our school once or twice a week.

He guided us through an hour of running around the gym, trying to climb a huge rope suspended from the ceiling and tossing wooden “Indian pins” around.

One of the janitors was Mr. Kenyon. I remember the janitors’ little office. It was tucked in between the furnace and the boys’ lavatory in the school’s cavernous basement.

Vintage Hodgepodge

(These paragraphs are from the Hodge-podge column of January 26, 2002.)

A few weeks before Christmas I was with my wife at one of those perfect kind of places that have a lot of stuff to look at.

Some new stuff, but a lot of old stuff – things that still smell like the attic or cellar where they’ve been since they fell into the “not particularly useful, but way too good to throw away” category – probably many years ago.

When we go to those kinds of places we tend to wander off in different directions. She gravitates toward the sewing stuff – spools of thread, thimbles, buttons, old lace, or swatches of material.

That day I wandered around the store, looking at everything, stopping to investigate a few things. I stopped to browse through a couple of old books, but I didn’t buy anything.

My wife did better, finding a whole carton of old sewing stuff. She bought it, we put it in the car and headed home.

“Harold Kenyon,” I said excitedly after we had driven a couple of blocks from the store.

“Where?” she asked, looking in both directions.

I quickly returned to West Genesee Street from my vision from more than 50 years ago of Mr. Kenyon standing in the boiler room at McKinley School.

Mr. Kenyon wasn’t just a janitor at the elementary school that I attended. He was an important part of the lives of every kid that spent kindergarten through sixth grades at the school.

We saw him every day as we passed his “office” while taking the shortcut through the basement from one side of the school to the other.

I had thought of Mr. Kenyon a few times in the 50-plus years since the big furnace in the basement of the school was a highlight of my life, but I hadn’t thought of him for years.

Until that day at the old stuff shop: While browsing through the old books I noticed that a couple had Harold Kenyon, West Pleasant Avenue, written in a boyish scrawl on the first page.  And that was that until I was driving home on West Genesee Street.

“Where the heck did he come from?” my wife asked.

“I think he lived right across from the school,” I said.

“No, I mean why did you think about him all of a sudden?”

I told her, and said I’d have to look at the books again the next time we went to that store.

My mother always told me that magical things happened at Christmas time. And it’s true. Christmas morning, Mr. Kenyon’s books were under our Christmas tree. I will probably think of him a lot more often now.

Sixth-Grade Memories

My sixth-grade class at McKinley had to leave the school and go on to Roosevelt Junior High School a year early so construction on an addition to the school could get underway.

At Roosevelt, students moved from room to room between classes, but not us interlopers from McKinley.

We were in the junior high school building, but we were sixth-graders. Our teacher, Mrs. Finnegan, was new to the school too. I remember her sing-songing her name to us – “F-i, double n-e,” she sang,  “g-a-n spells Finnegan.”

It wasn’t quite as polished as Dennis Day’s version of the St. Pat’s Day favorite, “Harrigan,” but it was a welcome introduction to our new school.

… Roy Hodge 

Poetry Corner: Blossom Bride

 by Jim Farfaglia

 

Once a year she appears,

this spring bride all aglow;

ready to take her vows again

just beyond my kitchen window.

 

Oh, how her white gown shines

next to new and ever-greens;

the gray of winter fading fast,

her blossoms pure as dreams.

 

She stands with arms reaching,

joyful to marry this season;

we witnesses, content to wait,

for joy is the best of all reasons.

Bodley Bulletins

By Julia Ludington

As the school year comes closer to its end, it seems as though the schedule of G. Ray Bodley events becomes busier and busier!

Our GRB Quirks Players will be participating in the 55th annual Dramafest at SUNY Oswego May 2.

Rehearsals were held last Wednesday, and will also take place today and tomorrow from 6 to 8 p.m. in the auditorium.

The group will be performing an excerpt from Curtains, the musical that appeared onstage this spring at GRB. We wish all of our actors and actresses the best of luck!

Yearbooks are still available for pre-order for $60. Students can bring payments to Mr. Senecal in room 228 during Guided Study Hall if they have not yet ordered one.

The yearbook is a fantastic investment and will be valuable to you when you are much older (think how much your grandchildren will love it!). Don’t wait until they are all gone!

If you are attending the junior prom and have not picked up an order form for pictures yet, they are available in Mr. Lacey’s room. Pictures will be taken outside, weather permitting.

Any boys interested in playing soccer this summer and next fall must attend a mandatory meeting May 2.

If you are unable to attend, make sure you see Mr. Murray before May 2 to receive the information you will be missing.

Check out the district website for upcoming sports games and concerts. Sectional matchups are just around the corner, and I am sure that many of our teams would appreciate the support!

Porky and Buddy: How to find a lost pet

Dear Jo and all of our readers,

Last week we offered some advice to Jo about precautions she could take to prevent her new dog becoming lost.

This week we want to talk about what to do if the worst case scenario happens and your dog comes up missing.

First, panic! Then get over that and start working.

(You might also want to feel guilty, but you don’t have time at first, so save that for later.)

There are many steps you can take to locate your missing dog. Swift action coupled with major neighborhood networking, will increase the odds. The key is to get the information out to as many people and places as you can.

So enlist the help of friends, family and neighbors in your search.

Knock on doors and talk to the people in your own neighborhood first. Cover at least a three-block radius, or if you are in a rural area, go to the nearest neighbors.

Hand out flyers with your pet’s picture on them, the date of loss and your phone number, and offer a reward..

Give copies of your flyers to veterinarians, groomers, trainers, pet stores, the post office, the grocery store and any place that gets neighborhood traffic and ask them to put them up. There is very good advice about how to turn your flyers into effective posters here.

Contact all of the Animal and Dog Control Officers, and all animal rescue groups, including the Oswego County Humane Society, in a 20-mile radius.

Visit the local shelters in person, bring a picture and ask to see their animals. Don’t give a description over the phone; descriptions can be misinterpreted. Go back every couple of days.

Don’t assume that your Animal or Dog Control Officer will be looking for you. Under New York Law, they are required to hold the pets they find for five business days to give you time to find them.

If your pet has no identification (or has lost it), the god control officers and animal control officers who may have found your pet have no resources to conduct a search for you but they do love to reunite pets with their owners. So keep contacting them.

Many local newspapers and shopping guides allow free “Lost and Found” ads. Also check the newspaper listings for Found Dogs and Cats. Some people look only in the local newspaper to locate an animal’s owner..

You can often register your pet online on services such as the online newspapers and Craig’slist and even upload a picture.

You should also search the “found” section of these same online services.  There are also online lost pet recovery services that charge a fee. One is petamberalert.com.

Do it all again and again …

Don’t give up. Lost pets have been found weeks, months, and occasionally years after they go missing. Good luck!

When you find your missing best friend, that is when you can indulge in guilty feelings, but you won’t want to because you are so relieved.

Speaking of guilt, the Oswego County Humane Society is always in need of dry cat and kitten food for its foster cats and for low income families in our county.

There will be a collection cart at the Fulton Price Chopper until May 4. Stop by to chat with Oswego County Humane Society volunteers and make a donation if you can.

The Oswego County Humane Society provides spay/neuter services and assistance, fostering and adoption of animals in urgent need, humane education programs, and information and referrals to animal lovers throughout Oswego County.

Our office is located at 265 W. First St., Oswego, New York. Phone is 207-1070. Email is ochscontact@hotmail.com. Website is  oswegohumane.org.

State Senate Report

By state Sen. Patricia Ritchie

From camping and hiking to picnics and water sports, New York state parks provide the perfect venue for almost any outdoor activity.

Because our parks are such important natural resources, it’s so important that we protect them and keep them pristine.

That’s the goal of the third annual  “I Love My Park Day,” a statewide event taking place on May 3rd that aims to improve and enhance New York’s state parks and historic sites.

Through I Love My Park Day, thousands of volunteers from across the state will head out to beautify participating parks and historic sites by doing things such as cleaning up lands and beaches, planting trees and gardens, restoring trails and wildlife habits and working on other improvement projects.

There are more than 80 I Love my Park Day events taking place across New York State this year. To register to volunteer at a park or historic site near you, visit the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation’s website at www.nysparks.com.

If you’re someone who enjoys the outdoors and frequents our state’s many parks and historic sites, you’ll be pleased to know that the new state budget makes key investments that will help to protect and enhance New York’s natural resources as well as support important environmental initiatives that create jobs, boost tourism and benefit communities across our state.

Contained in the new spending plan is a $9 million increase to the Environmental Protection Fund, bringing the total funding to $162 million which will help to protect open spaces, restore historic sites, control invasive species, create and enhance parks as well as support numerous other projects related to the environment.

In addition, the new state budget also includes an additional $132.5 million in NY Works funding for improvements to parks and historic sites and environmental resiliency efforts.

While the state budget goes a long way to support our state’s parks and historic sites, there’s a lot more that can be done — and you can lend a hand. By volunteering at I Love My Park Day, you can help to preserve and beautify these important resources for future generations.

Editor’s Note: One of the clean-up events will be at Fort Ontario State Historic Site in Oswego. See story below.