Category Archives: Historical Fulton

Historical Fulton, N.Y.: The Broadway bridge

As work continues on the newest upgrade to the Broadway bridge in Fulton, here is a photo of it being built. There was no date on this photo, but it seems to be 1915, when the city redid the original iron bridge structure and made a concrete fix to the bridge deck. According to the Friends of History, there were four bridges before the Broadway bridge — two early ones were wooden and both washed away. After the Civil War, an iron bridge was put in to improve the strength of the bridge. But it was built with a rise on the deck going from east to west. It was such a steep rise that when the bridge was icy in the winter, men had to get out of the trolley cars when they used the bridge and push the trollies up the hill over the bridge. The 1915 work realigned the deck so it was flat. That fix on the bridge cost $200,000 and a Lester Paddoch loaned the city $8,000 to finish the job. The bridge was revamped again in 1966 at the cost of $2 million. This current work at the bridge costs $12.2 million. Photo courtesy of fultonhistory.com
As work continues on the newest upgrade to the Broadway bridge in Fulton, here is a photo of it being built. There was no date on this photo, but it seems to be 1915, when the city redid the original iron bridge structure and made a concrete fix to the bridge deck. According to the Friends of History, there were four bridges before the Broadway bridge — two early ones were wooden and both washed away. After the Civil War, an iron bridge was put in to improve the strength of the bridge. But it was built with a rise on the deck going from east to west. It was such a steep rise that when the bridge was icy in the winter, men had to get out of the trolley cars when they used the bridge and push the trollies up the hill over the bridge. The 1915 work realigned the deck so it was flat. That fix on the bridge cost $200,000 and a Lester Paddoch loaned the city $8,000 to finish the job. The bridge was revamped again in 1966 at the cost of $2 million. This current work at the bridge costs $12.2 million.
Photo courtesy of fultonhistory.com

Historical Fulton, N.Y.: Snow?

Well, what’s better during these hot and humid dog days of summer than to remember scenes like this? This is a shot of Oneida Street in Fulton during the winter of 1895. Not much of a view from the storefronts there — just mounds and mounds of snow taller than the people in the photo. This just shows that while Fulton gets a good amount of snow now, it also got its fair share more than 100 years ago. So when you start to complain about the heat this summer, just remember this photo.   Photo courtesy fultonhistory.com
Well, what’s better during these hot and humid dog days of summer than to remember scenes like this? This is a shot of Oneida Street in Fulton during the winter of 1895. Not much of a view from the storefronts there — just mounds and mounds of snow taller than the people in the photo. This just shows that while Fulton gets a good amount of snow now, it also got its fair share more than 100 years ago. So when you start to complain about the heat this summer, just remember this photo.
Photo courtesy fultonhistory.com

Historical Fulton, N.Y.: Oswego County Medical Society

This photo shows a gathering from the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Oswego County Medical Society. A good-looking collection of doctors, a couple of nurses and even a dog posed for the photo. According to the 1895 Landmark’s Book of Oswego County, “laws then governing the admission and practice of physicians were substantially worthless; but in 1806 the state Legislature passed an act repealing former laws applying to this profession, and authorizing a general State Medical Society and County Societies. Under the provisions of this act, the Medical Society of the County of Oswego was organized June 9, 1821, at the school-house in Oswego village, with Benjamin Coe in the chair, and Luther Cowan, secretary.” The book states early records of this society were twice destroyed by fire, leaving little record of one of the oldest organizations in the county. Among its original members were Anson Fay and Luther Cowan, of Volney; Allen Andrews, of Pulaski; Stephen F. Kinney, of New Haven; Sardius Brewster, of Mexico; Benjamin Coe, of Oswego; J. Gurnsey, Dr. Gridley and possible others. The first officers of the society were Benjamin Coe, president; Stephen F. Kinney, vice president; Luther Cowan, secretary; Anson Fay, treasurer; J. Gurnsey, Luther Cowan, and Anson Fay, censors.  The second meeting was held at the house of Ezra May on the first Tuesday in June, 1822. Today, the county still has its own medical society, but it is managed by a combined group based in New Hartford, Oneida County, called the Medical Society of the Counties of Oneida, Herkimer, Madison, Chenango, Oswego, Cayuga and St. Lawrence. There are 39 members of the Oswego County society. Photo courtesy fultonhistory.com
This photo shows a gathering from the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Oswego County Medical Society. A good-looking collection of doctors, a couple of nurses and even a dog posed for the photo. According to the 1895 Landmark’s Book of Oswego County, “laws then governing the admission and practice of physicians were substantially worthless; but in 1806 the state Legislature passed an act repealing former laws applying to this profession, and authorizing a general State Medical Society and County Societies. Under the provisions of this act, the Medical Society of the County of Oswego was organized June 9, 1821, at the school-house in Oswego village, with Benjamin Coe in the chair, and Luther Cowan, secretary.” The book states early records of this society were twice destroyed by fire, leaving little record of one of the oldest organizations in the county. Among its original members were Anson Fay and Luther Cowan, of Volney; Allen Andrews, of Pulaski; Stephen F. Kinney, of New Haven; Sardius Brewster, of Mexico; Benjamin Coe, of Oswego; J. Gurnsey, Dr. Gridley and possible others. The first officers of the society were Benjamin Coe, president; Stephen F. Kinney, vice president; Luther Cowan, secretary; Anson Fay, treasurer; J. Gurnsey, Luther Cowan, and Anson Fay, censors. The second meeting was held at the house of Ezra May on the first Tuesday in June, 1822. Today, the county still has its own medical society, but it is managed by a combined group based in New Hartford, Oneida County, called the Medical Society of the Counties of Oneida, Herkimer, Madison, Chenango, Oswego, Cayuga and St. Lawrence. There are 39 members of the Oswego County society.
Photo courtesy fultonhistory.com

Historical Fulton, N.Y.: Sealright

This photo from fultonhistory.com shows the old Sealright Co. factory along with a collection of some of the bottle caps made at the plant through the years. Sealright was founded in 1883 by Forrest Weeks as the Oswego Falls Pulp and Paper Co. in Fulton. One of its early major products was newsprint for newspapers. Then, when the company acquired the rights to a new cylindrical paper container with sanitary properties that could be used for dairy products like cottage cheese and ice cream, the ‘Sealrights’ were born. This line of products was so successful that Oswego incorporated a subsidiary of the company called Sealright in 1917. In 1921, the company introduced its first milk container. In the 1940s, it became a publicly traded company and in the 1960s it became associated with Phillips Petroleum. It was purchased by Huhtamaki in 1998. Photo courtesy fultonhistory.com
This photo from fultonhistory.com shows the old Sealright Co. factory along with a collection of some of the bottle caps made at the plant through the years. Sealright was founded in 1883 by Forrest Weeks as the Oswego Falls Pulp and Paper Co. in Fulton. One of its early major products was newsprint for newspapers. Then, when the company acquired the rights to a new cylindrical paper container with sanitary properties that could be used for dairy products like cottage cheese and ice cream, the ‘Sealrights’ were born. This line of products was so successful that Oswego incorporated a subsidiary of the company called Sealright in 1917. In 1921, the company introduced its first milk container. In the 1940s, it became a publicly traded company and in the 1960s it became associated with Phillips Petroleum. It was purchased by Huhtamaki in 1998.
Photo courtesy fultonhistory.com

Historical Fulton: The Fulton Fire Department

The Fulton Fire Department was organized April 16,1857, although there were small volunteer groups of firefighters when the place was just a village dating back to 1838. The first steam engine was bought in 1866 and the second in 1870. This photo shows a 1900 “steam pumper.” The firefighters would draw water from the canal or river and use it to fight fires. These steam pumper were drawn by horses. The department became a paid department in 1905 along with the first salaried fire chief, assistant and eight full-time firefighters and 15 more who were being trained and on call. Also in that same time period the first series of fire hydrants were installed throughout the city eliminating the need of the canal/river in some instances. Fulton got its first fire “truck” in 1916. There was no roof and no windshield, so getting to fires in the rain or snow was quite the challenge. In 1981, the department joined the computer age and got its first computer. The paid department celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2005. Photo courtesy of fultonhistory.com
The Fulton Fire Department was organized April 16,1857, although there were small volunteer groups of firefighters when the place was just a village dating back to 1838. The first steam engine was bought in 1866 and the second in 1870. This photo shows a 1900 “steam pumper.” The firefighters would draw water from the canal or river and use it to fight fires. These steam pumper were drawn by horses. The department became a paid department in 1905 along with the first salaried fire chief, assistant and eight full-time firefighters and 15 more who were being trained and on call. Also in that same time period the first series of fire hydrants were installed throughout the city eliminating the need of the canal/river in some instances. Fulton got its first fire “truck” in 1916. There was no roof and no windshield, so getting to fires in the rain or snow was quite the challenge. In 1981, the department joined the computer age and got its first computer. The paid department celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2005.
Photo courtesy of fultonhistory.com

Historical Fulton, N.Y.: L.P. Smith Co.

This photo from 1923 shows the L.P. Smith Co., at 8-13 S. First St., Fulton. The store was the outgrowth of a business founded about 1860 called Case, Wooden & Conger. That was succeeded by Wooden & Conger and then J.H. Wooden became the sole proprietor. The next change was to Snow & Loomis and later the title became the Fulton Hardware Co. Finally, in 1911, the designation of L.P. Smith Co. was adopted. One writeup about the store said it was of unusual length, practically double that of other stores in the city. An ad on fultonhistory.com for the company told of an “Unprecedented Paint Sale” after the firm bought a thousand gallons of Crown Paint. Gallons sold for $1.85, half gallons for 95 cents and quarts for 50 cents. “Largest Stock of Paint Supplies in the City of Fulton” the ad claims. Photo courtesy of fultonhistory.com
This photo from 1923 shows the L.P. Smith Co., at 8-13 S. First St., Fulton. The store was the outgrowth of a business founded about 1860 called Case, Wooden & Conger. That was succeeded by Wooden & Conger and then J.H. Wooden became the sole proprietor. The next change was to Snow & Loomis and later the title became the Fulton Hardware Co. Finally, in 1911, the designation of L.P. Smith Co. was adopted. One writeup about the store said it was of unusual length, practically double that of other stores in the city. An ad on fultonhistory.com for the company told of an “Unprecedented Paint Sale” after the firm bought a thousand gallons of Crown Paint. Gallons sold for $1.85, half gallons for 95 cents and quarts for 50 cents. “Largest Stock of Paint Supplies in the City of Fulton” the ad claims.
Photo courtesy of fultonhistory.com