Category Archives: Hannibal News

In And Around Hannibal: November 10, 2012

by Rita Hooper 

This passed weekend I attended a Women’s Conference in Albany. It was my first opportunity to speak with women who were in the path of Hurricane Sandy. It’s hard for folks to imagine the mere size of this storm…think of it as all of Europe being devastated like after World War II.

I was born during that war so I only have the pictures and history books to tell me what it was like. The massive airlifts on the part of the US to rebuild Europe and evacuate the people and bring in much needed supplies. Our coastline is gone. Life as these folks knew it is forever changed. As we go to the Adirondacks, many folks go to the shore for their vacation…the shore as they knew it, is no more. How rebuilding is done needs to be well thought out so catastrophes like these aren’t allowed to happen again.

One woman at the conference said she had lost her home, another said she lives in an apartment so couldn’t go out even after the water receded, because she would not be able to get back up the stairs. She said she is a survivor (having been burned out 40 years ago when her children were small and they lost everything at Christmas time) so she camped out.

She took little tea lite candles and put them in a cake pan, put a baking cooling rack on top, took a fry pan and cooked herself an egg. Probably the best egg she ever ate. All of the women from that area said they came to the conference for hot meals, hot showers and a bed to sleep in and a chance not to think about what the next step might be for them. A number would be not going back home as they had no home and were heading off to friends and relatives. Some were stocking up their cars with supplies to take with them. They have been uplifted by the support shown to them with the volunteers and supplies being given to them.

The keynote speaker was not able to come as she did not have enough gas in her car to idle in line to fill up her tank. A number of women were complete no shows…no phones or power to contact anyone with. A number contacted the conference to say they could not leave due to storm related circumstances.

Money is needed, clean-up supplies are needed, toiletries are needed, counseling is needed. There are many opportunities for you to give. Be it through the churches and their mission and service divisions, the Red Cross,  businesses and other volunteer groups. We have survived many blizzards but we have not seen anything like this. I grew up on Long Island and lived on the shore but nothing would have prepared the people for this kind of storm. Hold these folks in your prayers and do what ever it is you can do to help out. There but for the grace of God go I!

*  *  *  *  *

I just heard while working the polls in Granby that the Hannibal varsity girls cheerleading team won first place in the small school’s division last week in Baldwinsville. Way to go girls!

The SW Oswego United Methodist Churchwill be having a roast beef dinner today, Nov. 10 starting at 4:30 p.m. The menu is roast beef, mashed potatoes, gravy, vegetable, salad, roll, and homemade pie for dessert. Take-outs are available. The church is located on 104, next to Ontario Orchards.

A Wreath Making Workshop will be held today, Nov. 10 at 10 a.m. at Godfrey’s Last Stand. Hands on making of an evergreen wreath with bow and a soup and bread lunch after. Sponsored by Friends of the Library.

The Hannibal American Legion Auxiliary Post 1552 will host a veterans appreciation breakfast Sunday, Nov. 11 from 7 to 11 a.m. at the Hannibal American Legion, 226 Rochester St.

Corey Welling is a graduate of Hannibal Central Schools and is in need of a lung transplant due to cystic fibrosis that he has had since he was 6 months old. He is now 27. He will need to be air-flighted to New York City within two hours of being notified that there are matching lungs for him.  A benefit will be held for him Nov. 11 at the Crazy Gator in Fulton. Music provided by DJ Chikara and the Claydo Ridge DJ’s. Checks are appreciated and may be sent to Corey Welling c/o Luanne Constanza, 225 West First St. Oswego, NY 13126.

The menu for the Senior Meals program this week is  beef stroganoff over egg noodles Monday, a Thanksgiving dinner with all the trimmings Wednesday, and fish clippers Friday. Call Rosemary at 564-5471 to make your reservation. The Senior Center in the Library/Community Center Building on Oswego St. across from the Fire House.

The Elderberries will be celebrating Thanksgiving at noon this Tuesday at the Senior Center (Library building). Bring a dish to pass and join them. Turkey is being supplied.

Hannibal’s ninth annual Country Christmas will be held Saturday, Nov. 17 and Sunday, Nov. 18.  There will be open houses, wine tasting, crafts and food, beverage samples and on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., the Christmas Bureau Carnival at the Kenney School.

The Hannibal United Methodist Church Craft Show will be Nov. 17 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Lunch will also be available and includes soup, sandwich, homemade pie and beverage. The eighth annual Festival of Trees and Wreaths will take place at the Hannibal Library Nov. 17 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 18 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

In And Around Hannibal: November 3, 2012

by Rita Hooper 

I imagine a number of my readers have been glued to their TV’s, radios and cell phones this week, listening to the details of the storm of the century.

I look at the pictures and really can’t believe it – Katrina was terrible but it didn’t cover the territory that this storm has. I think I heard Gov. Christie of NJ say that Monmouth County was the worst hit county in NJ and all but five counties were affected.

I lived in Monmouth Country before moving here in 1975. I can’t imagine what New York City is like without its subways and buses to say nothing of having power. I have a conference in Albany this week and many of the participants are coming from Long Island, New York City and New Jersey.

I wonder how our attendance will be. Albany is almost the end of the earth to down-staters, just like Hannibal is to people who live in Syracuse!

So what can we do to help? I have received word tonight from Presbyterian Disaster Assistance how I could contribute money. I imagine all the churches have set up a special Sandy fund, so check with your particular denomination – generally speaking, a much larger percentage of your donation go to those needing help if you give through a faith-based organization.

The American Red Cross is another place you may contribute to. If you are looking for something to do, Church World Service is already filling requests from New Jersey. You can put together hygiene kits and clean-up buckets.

If you google CWS kit program, you’ll find out exactly what to put in a kit or bucket. They can be dropped off at the local CWS headquarters Gateway Drive in North Syracuse. They will also accept money donations.

I have been a volunteer in their warehouse in Maryland and can vouch for their honesty. I assume before too long the re-building will be begin and then their will probably be requests for help in that area too.

I know many church groups still go down to New Orleans and the southern tier to help with disasters that happened several years ago and now are a distant memory to most of us. And a few prayers couldn’t hurt! So there are lots of ways those of us in central New York who are left counting our blessings can help.

On another note…

This is the Big Week coming up. Election Day is Tuesday just in case you have forgotten. Just a few more days and the ads will end. I have been one of those pesky phone volunteers and I’ve done it for years.  As callers say, you have to be made of tough stuff to put yourself in that position.

We don’t like calling anymore than you like receiving the calls, but they must work “cause everyone does it.” We chuckle when someone says “You’ve got my vote – your golden.” We are amazed when others ask, “who’s running? For what?”

I wonder if those folks know where to vote. I bumped into a gal the other day, who asked me how she could register. I work the polls on election day, too, and you would be surprised how many folks come in every year and have never voted before. It’s kind of fun to help an 18 year old cast their first vote…it’s like sharing in a person’s own little part in history. Poll workers are more than happy to assist.

I know it’s a right and the responsibility of every citizen to vote. I am angered when I hear of people who don’t vote and even angrier when those who vote, don’t take that responsibility seriously enough to do a little research on the candidates and issues.

I hope my voters do their research and remember to vote Tuesday. Polls are open from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. and, weather permitting, the lines shouldn’t be that long in our area.

*  *  *  *  *

A pulled pork dinner will be served at the Granby Center United Methodist Church Sunday, Nov. 4 from noon until 3 p.m. Eat-in or take-outs available.

The menu for the Senior Meals program this week is Homemade macaroni and cheese, veggie blend, scalloped tomatoes, and gelatin Monday; hot meatball sub, Italian blend veggies, tossed salad, and cookie Wednesday; and turkey stew, rice pilaf, veggie blend, and fruit cocktail Friday.

Why not consider joining them this week?  Call Rosemary at 564-5471 to make your reservation. It is held at the Senior Center in the Library/Community Center Building on Oswego Street.

The Jammers will be holding forth at the American Legion this Monday beginning at 7 p.m.

The annual Election Day Soup and Sandwich Luncheon with homemade pie for dessert will be held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Methodist Church, one block west of the Village Square.

UMC of Hannibal Center- South Hannibal is having its annual Election Day Ham Dinner starting at 5 p.m. at the Hannibal American Legion on Rochester Street.

TOPS will meet at Our Lady of the Rosary on Wednesday at 5:45 p.m.

The Hannibal Senior Band will present its Fall Fiesta Music Concert Wednesday, Nov. 7 at 7 p.m. in the High School Lockwood Auditorium.  Students will perform a variety of musical selections at varying degrees of difficulty.

The Jazz Ensemble will make its first appearance of the year at the start of the evening event. It features veteran members on solos throughout their tunes.

The Hannibal Methodist Church hosts a free chili and soup lunch Thursdays at 11:30 a.m.

Friends of the Library will hold a Wreath Making Workshop Saturday, Nov. 10 at 10 a.m. at Godfrey’s Last Stand. Hands-on making of an evergreen wreath with bow and a soup and bread lunch after. For information call Linda at 564-6643.

The fall raffle basket is at the library, Lots you’ll need for your kitchen and Thanksgiving table with a puzzle to keep the children busy after the parade.

Corey Welling is a graduate of Hannibal Central Schools and is in need of a lung transplant due to cystic fibrosis that he has had since he was 6 months old.  He is now 27.

It is through medical advances that Corey and others like him have been able to live.  He will need to be air-flighted to NYC within 2 hours of being notified that there are matching lungs for him. A benefit will be held for him Nov. 11 at the Crazy Gator in Fulton.

The Hannibal United Methodist Church’s craft show will be Nov. 17 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Lunch will also be available and includes soup, sandwich, homemade pie and beverage.

The church is located at Route 3 and Church Street, one block west of the Village Square.

This year’s show is being called the Debra Sidman Memorial Craft Show in memory of their long time chairwoman, Debra Sidman, who died recently.

Christmas Bureau applications may be picked up in the school nurse’s offices or at any of the Hannibal churches. Deadline is Dec. 7.

No applications will be accepted after that date. Anyone who would like to help out in any way is asked to call 546-7916.

Hannibal, Phoenix cross country take part in championship meet

by Rob Tetro

Both the Hannibal and Phoenix boys varsity cross country teams took part in the OHSL League Championship Meet Oct. 24.

In a meet that featured 141 runners from 10 different schools, Phoenix came away with a 10th place finish while Hannibal finished in second place.

Phoenix was led by Justin Rhodes, who finished in 45th place with a time of 19:04.4. Following Rhodes was Eric Hillpot, who earned a 58th place finish with a time of 19:22.9. Dylan Switzer finished in 63rd place with a time of 19:30.7 and Brian Stafford earned a 73rd place finish with a time of 20:08.2.

Michael Leach finished in 76th place with a time of 20:17.9. Brandon Halstead earned a 82nd place finish with a time of 20:23.7. Paul Boone finished in 84th place with a time of 20.35.2. Zach Manzer earned an 100th place finish with a time of 20:57.9.

Brendan Nichols finished in 104th place with a time of 21:18.01. Chris Fisk earned a 105th place finish with a time of 21:33.07. Jason Nipper finished in 107th place with a time of 21:35.5. Anthony Brienza earned an 109th place finish with a time of 21:43.3. Josh Dievendorf finished in 114th place with a time of 21:56.5.

Jacob Simpson earned a 125th place finish with a time of 23:01.2. Austin Wilson finished in 131st place with a time of 24:05.9. Tyler Gabrielle earned an 139th place finish with a time of 28.24.4. While Josh Stopher finished in 141st place with a time of 28.41.3.

The Warriors were led by Ryan Perry, who finished in second place with a time of 16:44.3. Ben Slate earned a 12th place finish with a time of 17:41.7 and Kyle Cooper finished in 16th place with a time of 17:48.

To read the rest of the story, pick up the latest copy of The Valley News. You may also subscribe to the paper by calling 598-6397

In And Around Hannibal: October 27, 2012

by Rita Hooper

At a loss for words this week, so I’m digging into the archives.

The Reveille was a newspaper in Hannibal a very long time ago. The name was revived for a brief time in the 1970s by the Hannibal Historical Society when the Society published a newsletter containing information of their activities, interviews and stories of interest to the folks in Hannibal.

So herewith, I print excerpts of an interview with Minnie Humphrey Perkins. Some of my readers I’m sure will remember that the Perkins family grew some of the best tasting corn in the area. They lived on upper Church Street.

“I never started school until I was eight years old, and then I didn’t want to go, but my mother said if I didn’t, the man would come and get me, and that frightened me enough so I went…hadn’t been to school but a few days, and I loved it so much! If I could get any child that didn’t know as much as I did, I would get them on the recitation bench. We walked to school with neighbor children, if we had any. The road was always rough and we plodded along. Sometimes we’d throw stones and fill up a hole. We carried our own school supplies, which included a reader, a math book after we got to third grade. There was no help from the school. We carried our own lunch in a lunch bag, and I remember if we got a loaf of store bought bread we kept the wrapper and would carry it back home for future use because there was no waxpaper.

“The school was at the end of Humphrey Road where it joined onto the Sterling Station Road. This is where I went through the 7th grade. Each morning we would sing 3 or 4 songs, and the teacher would read a little bit from the Bible and we would all say the Lord’s Prayer and salute the flag. During Thanksgiving and Christmas time we usually had a little program. At the end of the year, we had a picnic, and each parent would furnish a covered dish and sandwiches. We always had lemonade or something like that. The parents would be invited and a couple of times we had the picnic in a small woods out back of the school.

“While going to school, of course we had lots of fun. We played hide and seek, Anthony, Anthony over, and during the winter we rode downhill. One of the boys across the road from the school had a democrat wagon, and they had taken the box off so there was just a center post from wheels to wheels. We would all get on the center post, and he would steer the contraption down the hill, with a rope tied to each of the two wheels. We made a little pond in the winter and skated on that. The teacher always trusted us, seems so. We were allowed to do things that now they’re skeptical about allowing children to do.

“Minnie went onto High School in Fair Haven and went on to become a teacher. These are some of her experiences while teaching! We would start our morning exercises, them start with first grade reading and end with the upper grade math just before dinner. After lunch we would have our social works and language. We always had recesses and hour at lunch. I would always go to the playground and play with the children. I love baseball, and we always had a team to play that. Other times I would play Anthony, Anthony over or hide and seek with all the children.

“We always had a first aid kit at school, and the children were taught to take care of all the little ailments with bandages and a little mercurcrome, different salves, things like that. I remember children having pink eye. We ‘doctored’ pink eye ‘til we were pretty well over it. Then one little girl started the epidemic again. She came to school with pink eye, expecting to be doctored. The rest had more or less gotten cured, so I told her she had to go home. She wouldn’t go so I carried her and she kicked me and screamed all the way, which was about ¼ mile across the lot. Another incident I remember up at the stone school- one of the boys found a whole bunch of little snakes that had just hatched out. They stuck them in one boy’s pocket and he was afraid to take the little snakes out of the pocket, so the teacher had to do it. They were the size of a good big angleworm.

“After teaching 19 years at rural schools, I obtained a position at Hannibal Central. Here I taught first grade for two years and third grade for 20 years, when I retired in 1969.”

I hope this has jogged some memories for a few of my readers and maybe even given somebody the idea to interview some of our long time residents — people are precious resources and they can leave a legacy long after they are gone!

*  *  *  *  *

The Ecumenical Key Council, representing the churches of Hannibal, Hannibal Center and Martville areas will be holding a bake sale today, Saturday Oct. 27 from 9 a.m. to noon at the Village Market.

Money raised at this sale will be used by the Resource Center to help with their Thanksgiving Baskets and for the Christmas Bureau.

The Hannibal Fire Company breakfast buffet will be tomorrow, Sunday 0ctober 28 at the Hannibal Firehouse, Oswego Street, from 8 to 11 a.m.

Southwest Oswego Methodist Church will be breaking forth in concert Sunday afternoon from 2 to 5 p.m. Money received will be donated to the Senior Nutrition Program and the Blizzard Bags Project for Meals on Wheels.

At 2 p.m., ”Lost & Found,” the Praise band for First U.M.C., will be performing. As a side note, Gale Cacchione, a vocalist with the group, is a second-grade teacher at Fairley School. At 4 p.m., “Theophonics,” a six-person a cappella group from Liverpool, will be presenting. Ron Hurne, formerly a vocal music teacher with the Hannibal School District, formed the group in 2007 with Shawn Freed.

This concert is also supported by the Lake Effect Cooperative Ministries of the United Methodist Churches. Donations of canned goods and money are appreciated.

Cabin 3 Youth group is hosting a concert tomorrow Oct. 28 at 6 p.m. at Lakeview Manor in Fulton.  The “Small Town America Tour” features music by Seventh Day Slumber, The Beautiful Refrain, and Blank Pages as well as a testimony from Joseph Rojas.

When I was in Texas, I noticed the Christmas decorations were being put up in the stores. When I got home, I had a note in my mail from Sharon Figiera, asking me to put a notice in on Christmas Bureau applications.

I guess Santa and his reindeer are planning on stopping by Hannibal this year. Don’t any of you mess up his plan – you better behave.

Christmas Bureau applications may be picked up in the School Nurse’s Offices or at any of the Hannibal Churches. Deadline is Dec. 7. No applications will be accepted after that date. Anyone who would like to help out in any way is asked to call 546-7916.

The menu for the Senior Meals program this week is Italian sweet sausage with peppers and onions on roll, baked beans, kernel corn, orange juice, and cookie on Monday and ham steak, scalloped potatoes, green beans, fruit cup on Wednesday.

Friday’s menu includes tuna salad sandwich, homemade soup, juice, and cookie. Wednesday, they will have their Halloween party. You are invited to come in costume if you dare!

Call Rosemary at 564-5471 to make your reservation.

The Jammers will be holding forth at the American Legion this Monday beginning at 7 p.m.

TOPS will meet at Our Lady of the Rosary on Wednesday at 5:45PM.

The Hannibal Methodist Church hosts a free chili and soup lunch Thursdays at 11:30 a.m.

Corey Welling is a graduate of Hannibal Central Schools and is in need of a lung transplant due to cystic fibrosis that he has had since he was 6 months old. He is now 27.

It is through medical advances that Corey and others like him have been able to live. He will need to be air-flighted to New York City within two hours of being notified that there are matching lungs for him.

A benefit will be held for him Nov. 11 at the Crazy Gator in Fulton. Music provided by DJ Chikara and the Claydo Ridge DJ’s.

Hannibal tops Thousand Islands

by Rob Tetro

For the second season in a row, the Hannibal Varsity Football Team earned a victory in a cross divisional contest.

After dominating the first half, the Warriors had a 24-0 halftime lead. Despite Thousand Islands’ best efforts to rally during the second half, Hannibal held on for a 38-28 win.

Even though the Warriors scored only once during the first quarter, their defense quickly made it known that they were ready to play.  Hannibal’s lone first-quarter points came when Tim Webber scored on a run from two yards out.

Hannibal kept it going on both sides of the ball during the second quarter. The Warriors took a 16-0 lead when quarterback Trevor Alton threw a 10-yard touchdown pass to Jacob Shortslef. Hannibal added to its lead when Brandon Burnett scored on a run from 25 yards out. Burnett’s run gave the Warriors a 24-0 advantage.

Thousand Islands got some momentum on both sides of the ball during the third quarter. Collin Bourcy rushed for a two-yard touchdown run, which cut Hannibal’s lead down to 16 points at 24-8.

Both offenses were in prime form during the fourth quarter.  The Warriors lead was cut to eight points at 24-16 when Alex Cooley scored on a run from three yards out.

To read the rest of the story, pick up the latest copy of The Valley News. You may also subscribe to the paper by calling 598-6397
‘Anybody’s Guess'

‘Fall into Music’ dance to benefit Hannibal Music Boosters

Anybody’s Guess
‘Anybody’s Guess’

“Fall into Music,” a dance to benefit Hannibal Music Boosters, will take place Saturday, Oct. 20 from 7 to 10 p.m. at Lakeview Lanes, Fulton.

Admission is free and there will be raffles for gift baskets, 50/50 drawings, and prize boards. There will be some contests for added fun.

“Anybody’s Guess” is donating its talent for the evening. The band is based in Hannibal and has long standing ties to the Hannibal Central School Music Program.

Forty years ago, Jack Beckwith introduced his band, “Anticipation,” to the Central New York party scene.  “Anticipation” had a successful 13-year run of wedding receptions, private parties, club venues and corporate dinner dances.

Music took a back seat until 2010 when Beckwith decided the time had come to renew his love of musical entertaining.

He organized the group “Anyboyd’s Guess.” In addition to vocals, Beckwith plays bass guitar, six-string, and trumpet.

Lead guitarist is Frank Tyrrell  and the drummer is Mike Solowy.  Beckwith’s wife, Faye, fills in with vocals and keyboards to round out the quartet.

“We look forward to a great evening of music and fun at Lakeview Lanes. We thank Mike Tryniski for donating the use of their party room for this event,” a spokesperson said. “We truly appreciate that “Anybody’s Guess” came to us offering to help out with a fund raiser to benefit music programs in Hannibal schools. They are proof that the love of music lasts a lifetime.”

In And Around Hannibal: October 13, 2012

by Rita Hooper 

On the road again – that’s where I am – enjoying the highways and byways of our country.

This year, I added the state of Oklahoma to my list of states visited…after a very long diagonal trip through Missouri. I passed the Arch in St. Louis at break-neck speed but managed to capture a few pics none the less. Next year I’ll get there if I have to jump out of the car!

Made it to the George Washington Carver Monument just before it closed but in plenty of time to get my National Park Passport stamped and do a quick walk through. Picked up a swamp oak acorn – they are about twice as long as the acorns up in our area.

I remember reading about George Washington Carver when I was in grade school. I connected him with peanuts. My 40 something son said, “I thought that was Jimmy Carter!”

Jimmy Carter was peanut man number-two — Carver was the first!  Carver was born a slave around 1864 on the Moses and Susan Carver farm in Diamond, Mo. His mother had been sold a slave in 1855 for $700; she was only 13 years old. He and his mother were kidnapped when he was an infant and he was found very sick and returned to the Carver farm. His mother was never found.

As he was “sickly,” he spent much of his time alone in the woods and fields around the farm. Even as a young child, he acquired the name “The Plant Doctor.” He left the farm in 1875 at age 11, never to return, but he took with him the values he had learned from the Carvers.

Carver had a love for creation and “believed that everything that had life was a window on God and a mouthpiece through which the great Creator spoke.”  He sought an education, but because of his race he was always denied. In 1890, he finally was accepted at Simpson College in Iowa where he was an art major.

After a year there, he transferred to Iowa State Ag School, now the State University, and became an agricultural major. He graduated from there with a bachelor’s and master’s degree in 1896.

He accepted an offer from Booker T. Washington to become the head of the new Agricultural Dept. at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama.

This answered his dream to become the greatest good to the greatest number of my people. His peanut work began in 1903; he was anxious to find a second crop for the south that would be a money maker, help the African-American farmer and at the same time replenish nutrients to the soil that cotton growing took out of it.

Carver found more than 300 uses for peanuts including use of them for massage for polio victims. In 1921, he testified before a Congressional committee debating a peanut tariff bill. He was to become a symbol of interracial cooperation. Edison and Ford sought information from him on industrial uses of plants, including peanuts and soybeans. He died in Tuskegee in 1943. Check out the internet or go to the library and find some books on him. He was a fascinating man, who overcame many hardships in life just so he could help his fellowman.

Yesterday, I saw some real life cowboys, rounding up some cattle on the range. I could hardly believe it as we sailed by them at 75 miles an hour.

We stopped in Muskogee, Okla. for the night and had a wonderful dinner at a steak house. It had some hombres playing cards – they were the strong silent type – and a dance hall floozy sprawled on top of the piano.  Naturally I had to touch them.

It must havebeen 25 years ago, Shirly Kring and I made a number of these life size mannequins – Shirly did the heads and I did the bodies. Shirly had bought out a company in, I think, Wisconsin that was making them.

One of those dummies had to have come from there. The others were made slightly differently and I know we didn’t ship any to Oklahoma. It’s great fun to bring up old memories…at least the good ones!

I never take a trip that I don’t wish we could build in a year of school for all the students to take a sabbatical – or a year off from school to travel the country.  CNY is just a very small part of it.  Many today don’t even have a chance to see the old cowboy pictures of my era, to know about the cowboys, cattle rustling, wide-open spaces and dancehall floozies.

To be continued next week with a visit to the Five Civilized Tribes Museum in Muskogee, Oklahoma.

That’s it for this week. I’ll leave you with a “Happy trails to you…until we meet again…keep smilin’ until then…”

*  *  *  *  *

The Friends of the Hannibal Free Library will be holding a Book and Bake Sale today, Oct. 13 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Sunday, Oct. 14 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. It will take place in the Hannibal Community Center, next to the library. There will  also be a wide variety of baked goods  for sale.

The Hannibal Historical Society is pleased to announce that pewter Christmas ornaments are now for sale. The ornament shows the original Hannibal Baptist Church on the front, with a short history of the building on the back.

Each ornament comes with a cord for hanging and a pouch for storage. Orders can be placed with Ann Mahaney by calling 564-5658 or e-mailing ammahaney@yahoo.com.

Ann will be at the Hannibal Library Tuesday, Oct. 23 from 6 to 8 p.m., where orders can be picked up and ornaments can be purchased.

The Hannibal Senior Band will be having a can and bottle drive Saturday, Oct. 13 from 9 a.m. to noon with support from N&N Redemption Center. Please start to save your empty returnable cans and bottles for collection that day. Anyone that needs to arrange a special pick-up time or location can call Shirley Terrinoni at 564-7910 ext. 4132.

The Sons of the American Legion will be holding a chicken barbecue tomorrow, Oct. 14 from noon until gone at the Legion on Rochester Street.

The Menu for this week at Senior Meals Program is beef stroganoff over noodles, green and yellow beans, orange juice, and brownie on Monday; open-faced hot turkey sandwich, mashed potatoes, vegetable blend, cranberry juice, and cookie on Wednesday; and meatloaf with gravy, baked potato, spinach, and mandarin oranges on Friday.

Give Rosemary a call at 564-5471 to make your reservation.

The Jammers will be holding forth at the American Legion this Monday beginning at 7 p.m.

A Meet and Greet with Amy Tresidder, candidate for the New York State Senate, will be held at the Community Center Tuesday, Oct. 16 from 6:30 to 8 p.m.

TOPS will meet at Our Lady of the Rosary on Wednesday at 5:45 p.m.

The Hannibal Methodist Church hosts a free chili and soup lunch Thursdays at 11:30 a.m.

The Hannibal Historical Society is hosting an Archives Day Saturday, Oct. 20 from 10 a.m. t 4 p.m. at the Hannibal Community Center on Oswego Street.

Historian Lowell Newvine will show copies of newspaper clippings and photos dating from the mid 1800s. Lowell will also be available to help with genealogy research. The upstairs room will be open for those who wish to see artifacts owned by the Society.

Quick start leads Cato-Meridian past Hannibal

By Rob Tetro

Ten Hannibal seniors were honored for their contributions to the Hannibal football program prior to the Warriors’ game against Cato-Meridian Saturday.

The  seniors recognized were Brandon Jordan, Jacob Shortslef, Brandon Burnett, Eric Belge, Billy Lewis, Chris Prell, David Crowe, Dakota Carswell, Caleb Longley and Matt Bogawitch.

Cato-Meridian scored the game’s first 28 points en route to a 50-28 win.

After a quarter of play, Hannibal trailed by a touchdown. Cato-Meridian took an 8-0 lead during the first quarter when Quarterback Austin Bierce scored on a 12-yard run. Unfortunately for the Warriors, Cato-Meridian blew the game open during the second quarter.

Phil Schroder scored on a three-yard run. Shortly after, Bierce found Joe Schneider for a 46-yard touchdown pass, which gave Cato-Meridian a 22-0 lead. Later in the quarter, Cato-Meridian took a 28-0 lead when Schroder scored on a run from 18 yards out.

The Warriors were able to get on the scoreboard before the first half ended. Hannibal made the score 28-8 when Trevor Alton threw a 22-yard touchdown pass to Billy Lewis.

The second half was more competitive. During the third quarter, the Warriors cut Cato-Meridian’s lead down to 14 points at 28-14 following a Brandon Burnett touchdown.

Before the third quarter ended, Cato-Meridian added to its lead. Cato-Meridian made the score 36-14 when Bierce threw a 33-yard touchdown pass to Schneider.

The Warriors battled to the final whistle. Alton threw a nine-yard touchdown pass to Billy Lewis to cut Cato-Meridian’s lead to 16 points at 36-20.

Kyle Mappley responded with a three-yard touchdown run that gave Cato-Meridian a 44-20 lead. Burnett scored Hannibal’s last touchdown of the regular season. Burnett scored on a run from two yards out.

Following Burnett’s touchdown, the Warriors trailed by 16 points at 44-28. Schneider went on to tally another score for Cato-Meridian before the game ended. Schneider capped off Cato-Meridian’s 22-point win with a four-yard touchdown run.

To read the rest of the story, pick up the latest copy of The Valley News. You may also subscribe to the paper by calling 598-6397