Category Archives: Hannibal News

Hannibal baseball tops Jordan-Elbridge and Cazenovia

by Rob Tetro

During the week, the Hannibal varsity baseball team earned wins against Jordan-Elbridge and Cazenovia to improve its record to 3-1.

Hannibal held Jordan-Elbridge to one run en route to a solid win April 15.

The Warriors’ April 17th game against Cazenovia proved to be far more challenging. Hannibal scored a crucial fifth-inning run while holding off Cazenovia for the hard fought win.

The Warriors got off to a quick start when they took on Jordan-Elbridge. They jumped out to a 2-0 lead during the top of the first inning. Jordan-Elbridge responded with a run during the bottom of the second inning to cut Hannibal’s lead down to 2-1. The Warriors kept Jordan-Elbridge scoreless the rest of the way. Hannibal scored four runs during the third, fourth and fifth innings to cap off a 6-1 win.

The Warriors were led by Jake Shortslef, Greg Pitcher and Mike Cook, who all had two hits.

Matt Wagner, Austin Matteson and Matt Bogawitch, and Austin France each chipped in a hit. France’s one hit was a solo home run.

Trevor Alton got it done one the mound for the Warriors. Alton finished with eight strikeouts while giving up only a run on five hits in five innings of play.

Shortslef saw some time in relief of Alton. He struck out five Jordan-Elbridge batters while giving up only one hit in two innings of work.

Cazenovia was ready to battle when it took on Hannibal.

To read the rest of the article, pick up a copy of The Valley News. You can subscribe by calling 598-6397 or click on the link on our home page.

In and Around Hannibal: A difficult week

Rita Hooper 

706-3564

Twohoops2@juno.com

It’s been difficult to think of something to write about this week – the bombing at the Boston Marathon has taken the wind out of my sails so to speak.

Couple that with the rental truck at Oklahoma City that was briefly under suspicion, reminiscent of the bombing there in 1995 and the ricin letters to the senator and president, it’s been a tough week and it’s only Wednesday.

The country is on heightened alert. For a news junkie, it’s even a bit too much to assimilate – which reminds me, I haven’t heard anything on the North Korea threat since Sunday, I guess they haven’t sent off any nuclear bombs as was the suspicion they would do on Monday.

Life does go on for most of us.  Some of us will never be able to forget and will live with the losses as long as they live.

I have no sage words – but prayers can never hurt – for those who lost their lives and their families and friends — for those hurt so severely — for those first responders, volunteers, medical staff and law enforcement that helped so quickly making the loss of life less than it might have been — for our leaders that cool heads prevails — for ourselves that we not jump to hasty conclusions and loose faith in our fellow man.

The eight-year old who died Monday made a poster a year ago that read “Stop Hurting Each Other” and “Peace.”

Perhaps that’s one thing we can all do — stop the hurt, whether it’s bullying or mean words, not so good business practices or disharmony in families.

Maybe it’s making amends, maybe it’s reading and getting to know people that aren’t “just like us.”

In this season of new life, think about what it is that you and I can do to stop hurting others and bring that peace we all seek.

 

To read the rest of the column, pick up a copy of The Valley News. You can subscribe to The Valley News by calling the office at 598-6397 or follow the link on our homepage.

In And Around Hannibal: April 13, 2013

by Rita Hooper 

In June, I will be representing Presbyterian Women of the Synod of the Northeast on a mission trip to Eastern Tennessee and Western North Carolina, a section of the country commonly referred to as Appalachia.

There will be about 25 women from all over the country taking part in this trip. We will be attending lectures and workshops, meeting with local historians and Appalachian women to better understand the history and culture of the region.

We will tour and fellowship with local organizations serving women, children and families. We will learn about the evolution and existing ministry of the Presbyterian Church and the challenges faced by women, children and families living in the area.

Appalachia is an area covering more than 200,000 square miles that follow the spine of the Appalachian Mountains from Pennsylvania to Mississippi; it includes all of West Virginia and parts of 11 other states.  Forty-two percent of the region’s population is classified as rural as compared with 20 percent of the national population.

In 1965, one in three Appalachians lived in poverty and 223 counties were considered economically disadvantaged. By 2008 the poverty rate had dropped to 18 percent and in 2013, the number of counties considered economically disadvantaged has been cut to 98.

Appalachia was one of the areas impacted by the War on Poverty begun back in the ‘60’s that bought us among other programs, Head Start, Vista, Job Corps, Legal Services and the office of Economic Opportunity, which administered the program.  This was sometimes referred to as Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society.  Having been a young adult at this time, I can tell you it was exciting.

For a country in trauma following the assassination of the President, his brother and Martin Luther King, this was a program that a large part of this country could get behind and that many of us benefitted from. It was a bright spot in a war weary world.

Of course the programs had their critics and fell victim to politics. Nixon came in and dismantled many of the programs or transferred them to other agencies shutting down the office of Economic Opportunity.  Whether it was a good or bad, many folks benefitted from the programs as they were lifted out of poverty, received educations and finally the needs of the disadvantaged were being lifted up.

This was an area of the country whose economy was dependent on mining, forestry, agriculture, chemical and heavy industry. It has become more diversified in recent years but many of the urban Appalachians still live in polluted, low-income industrial areas where they are exposed to toxic substances.

At this point in time, one in five Appalachian children lives in poverty; at least 40,000 children lack health insurance.  Nearly 1/3 of the third graders have not been to a dentist in the past year or have ever had a dental exam. Infant mortality in some counties is twice the national average. Many lack the very basics of necessities like indoor plumbing and running water. This is not in a third world country but in the United States.

This area had the usual influx of immigrants, Poles, Irish, English, Scotch and Africans, among others. The Native Americans were displaced during the Trail of Tears.  In spite of all the “downers,” it is an area rich in scenery, culture, crafts, music and story telling. I am excited about all there is for me to see, learn and do. I look forward to this trip.

When I return, I have committed to spend the next two years speaking about the area and advocating for their needs throughout the Northeast.

There will be a mission fair and spaghetti dinner at the First United Church (33 S. Third St., Fulton, April 27 from 4 to 8 p.m.; dinner from 5:30 until sold out.

Dr. Joan Hillsman will be bringing us worship through music with an emphasis on Appalachian music. That alone will make it something you won’t want to miss. I do hope many of my friends and faithful readers from Hannibal and the surrounding area will circle the date and come and offer their support.

*  *  *  *  *

On another subject, I’ve been giving considerable thought, as I think some of my readers have, about how we get government moving in Washington. These folks were elected to work — and they did — they shortened their own working schedule, the number of days they spend in Washington.  But other than that much of Washington has been at a standstill. We have workshops on bullying locally, claim it’s a national issue and yet at every level of government, I see people in both parties using bullying tactics.

We elected these folks to get a job done, to do their own research (not listen to those infamous lobbyists and claim what they say as fact,) to sit down and work with each other, to invoke the fine art of compromise — remember when mom had one of her children cut the cake and the other children had first choice of the pieces?

So who do we have in Hannibal that we could get behind and send to Washington?  Who is it that would talk to power and tell them, they just may be too big for their britches and take them down a peg or two.

Who is it that could sit them down at a table and get the job done for us? And make them shake hands afterwards!

I ask my readers, if they would in their “pondering time’’ ponder this question and send me the names of people you think could do the job and why. It might just take a team! I have already decided who my nominee would be but I’d be interested in hearing yours.

*  *  *  *  *

The menu this week at the Senior Dining Center is:

April 15: Open-faced hot turkey sandwich, mashed potatoes, vegetable blend, and fruit cup.

April 17: Ham, boiled potatoes, carrots and cabbage, and applesauce.

April 19: Chicken Parmesan over pasta, vegetable blend, and cookie.

This week their program will include Wii bowling and other games Monday, Bingo on Wednesday, and Music with the Pritchards Friday. The Center opens at 10 and lunch is served at noon. Give Rosemary a call at 564-5471 to make your reservation. The center is located in the Library Building on Oswego Street.

The Hannibal Boy Scouts are selling “Camp Cards” as a fundraiser. The card sells for $5, but is worth more than this amount in value at local businesses. One half of the selling prices goes to the local Scout unit and is great way for Scouts to earn their way to camp. For more information, call Mr. Prosser at 564-5630.

Cabin 3 invites you to the S.O.S. FEST “Big Meeting” Tuesday, April 16 at 6 p.m. at God’s Vision Christian Church, 326 Church St, Hannibal. This will be the 3rd year of the S.O.S. FEST. It is a three-day Christian music festival held at the Hannibal Firemen’s Field July 19-21.

The Hannibal Methodist Church is holding prayer meetings at the home of Jack Lenhard on Pine View Lane at 7 p.m. Tuesday evenings and at 1 p.m. Thursdays in the church dining room, Route 3

Wednesday and Thursday, April 17 and 18 at 7 p.m., the Hannibal High School’s Drama Club, Purple Gallery, will present the comedy, “30 Reasons Not To Be In A Play,” by Alan Haehnel, in the Hannibal High School Lockwood Auditorium.

The Sterling Valley Community Church will be having its annual Men’s and Boy’s Dinner Friday, April 19 at 6 p.m. The menu will be Italian with homemade pies for dessert. The program will be presented by The Friends of Fort Ontario. Please call Judy at 564-5386 with your reservations.

The Friends of the Hannibal Free Library will be holding its Spring Book and Bake Sale Saturday, April 20 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Sunday, April 21 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. It will take place in the Hannibal Community Center, next to the library.

In and Around Hannibal: April 6, 2013

by Rita Hooper 

Sorry folks – it’s just the news this week. It’s been one of those weeks where you’re behind on Monday and it just gets worse from there.

Hope those of you who had the week off, had a good one. Those of us who were home while you were gone enjoyed the time to get caught up – except for those of us who got behind!

Granby Center United Methodist Church will have a chicken barbecue this Sunday, April 7 from noon until sold out. You may eat in or take-out. The church is on County Route 3, one mile west of Fulton.

Hannibal Dollars for Scholars is hosting a pulled pork barbecue Sunday, April 7 at the Hannibal American Legion on Rochester Street in Hannibal. The barbecue will run from noon until 3:30 p.m. or until sold out. The dinner includes pulled pork with a kaiser roll, coleslaw, salt potatoes, baked beans and dessert. Take-out dinners will be available. Pre-sale tickets are available. Visit the chapter website at hannibal.dollarsforscholars.org and e-mail one of the chapter contacts, or phone 564-5630.

All proceeds from the dinner will be used to provide scholarships to graduating seniors from Hannibal High School. In 2012, the chapter provided thirteen scholarships of $500 each to Hannibal students.

Hannibal Dollars for Scholars is a chapter of the national organization Dollars for Scholars.

The Senior Nutrition Program meets at the Senior Center, next to the library on Oswego Street, Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Lunch is served at noon but they are open by 10 a.m. for coffee, news and games. Give Rosemary a call and make your reservation now at 564-5471.

Monday, they will be serving meatloaf and Wednesday, they will be serving meatball subs. Friday, they will be serving pork chops and gravy. Monday, Wednesday and Friday Dominoes will be available and on Wednesday Bingo. Words with Friends will also be available!

The Elderberries will resume meeting at 6 p.m. this Tuesday evening. All senior citizens in the area are invited to join them for a covered dish dinner at the Community Center (Library Building). Please bring your own place setting and a dish to pass.

Snowbirds are beginning to return from the south so it will be good to see some faces we haven’t seen in a long time.

And Snowbirds – don’t believe anything you might have heard about us having snow April Fool’s Day — it was just a joke (a bad one at that) played by Mother Nature. You can come home now!

The Hannibal Boy Scouts are selling “Camp Cards” as a fund-raiser. One half of the selling prices goes to the local Scout unit and is great way for Scouts to earn their way to camp. Those seeking more information may call Mr. Prosser at 564-5630.

Cabin 3 invites you to the S.O.S. FEST “Big Meeting” Tuesday, April 16 at 6 p.m. at God’s Vision Christian Church, 326 Church St., Hannibal. All churches, youth groups, mission groups, youth sports teams, clubs, organizations, troops, boosters, vendors, and crafters are welcome to attend this informational meeting.

This will be the third year of the S.O.S. FEST. It is a three-day Christian music festival held at the Hannibal Firemen’s Field on July 19-21. Camping is available! Youth groups are encouraged to attend!

The Sterling Valley Community Church will be having its annual Men’s and Boy’s Dinner Friday April 19 at 6 p.m. The menu will be Italian with homemade pies for dessert. The program will be presented by The Friends of Fort Ontario. Please call Judy at 564-5386 with your reservations.

The Friends of the Hannibal Free Library will be holding its spring book and bake sale Saturday, April 20 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Sunday, April 21 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. It will take place in the Hannibal Community Center, next to the library.   There will be hundreds of books,  plus videos, and CD’s  for all ages and interests. This year, there will be many vintage (pre-1950’s) books. There will  also be a wide variety of baked goods for sale.

Local photographers Jack Pope, Judith Chillson and Harrison Wilde will be displaying their work at a photo show to be held Monday, April 22 at the Hannibal Municipal Building on Cayuga Street in Hannibal. The photos will be on display from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. This free show is sponsored by the Hannibal Historical Society.

The Friends of the Library have another raffle basket, this time a “Gardening Basket” full of needed supplies. Drawing April 27 at the library.

The Hannibal Community Yard Sale Day is being held Saturday, May 4. A master list of participants’ addresses is being prepared for public distribution and will be available at the Hannibal Community Center (library), located across from the fire department, the day of the event. Those interested in holding a yard sale May 4 and would like the address of your sale published on the master list, may call Barb or Carl at 564-6410 by Sunday, April 28.

Hannibal schools to hold registration

Kindergarten registration for the Hannibal Central School District is scheduled for Thursday and Friday, April 11 and 12 from 1:00 to 3:30 p.m. at the Fairley Elementary School.

Parents or guardians must bring the child’s birth certificate, immunization records and custody paperwork, if applicable.

Children will be screened at a later date; their attendance is not necessary for registration.  Parents will be asked to sign up for a screening appointment at registration.

Students currently enrolled in our Universal Pre-K program will not need to attend registration or schedule a screening appointment.

Registration packets have been mailed to the home of each child who will be 5 on or before December 1, 2013.

Parents with eligible children who have not received this information may call the Fairley School at 564-7945, ext. 3004.

Scrabble 21

Scrabble Club spells fun for Fairley students

For the past two weeks, 25 to 30 Fairley Elementary School third- and fourth-grade students have participated in the Scrabble Club. They play for an hour using the 10 Scrabble games purchased by the school through a grant from Novelis.
For the past two weeks, 25 to 30 Fairley Elementary School third- and fourth-grade students have participated in the Scrabble Club. They play for an hour using the 10 Scrabble games purchased by the school through a grant from Novelis.

by Terri DiGregorio

Remix? Bakery? Leader? What do these words have in common?

They are all words used by third and fourth graders in their games of Scrabble during the last meeting of the Fairley Elementary School Scrabble Club.

Yvette Gigliotti, a third grade teacher at Fairley, loves to play Scrabble with her coworkers through Literacy Volunteers and thought maybe the children in her class might like it, too.

Not only did her classroom enjoy it, all of the third and fourth graders in the school got involved in a weekly tournament held in the cafeteria after school.

When asked how they liked staying an extra hour after being in school all day, the replies included, “I think about it all day. I can’t wait!” “I hope we can do it again, it’s a lot of fun.”

For the past two weeks, 25 to 30 students have participated in the Scrabble Club. They play for an hour using the 10 Scrabble games purchased by the school through a grant from Novelis.

“They come right in and got started with such enthusiasm,” said Gigliotti. “I’ve watched their spelling improve each week and the words they come up with are amazing.”

One student spelled “Water” using two blank tiles in place of the “T” and “R.” Another spelled “Popes” for a score of 33 points.

Not only are the kids using their spelling and math, they’re learning to work as teams and making new friends. The excitement builds throughout their last game to see who the top scorers will be.

To read the rest of the story, pick up a copy of The Valley News or subscribe today by calling 598-6397

Hannibal school board continues budget work

by Terri DiGregorio

 The Hannibal Board of Education held its third budget workshop Monday night.

School board members discussed administrative costs, debt service and benefits for employees.

“The budget is a work in progress,” said Superintendent of Schools Donna Fountain. “We still don’t have all the numbers from the state, so that makes it difficult.”

Business Administrator Nancy Dingman gave a detailed presentation regarding the increases faced by the district, explaining why the numbers have almost doubled in some areas.

“Many of the additions are not something we have any control over,” Dingman said. “These are requirements which must be met. They are amounts set by the state that we have to meet in order to continue operating our schools.”

One of the largest increases falls under the central data processing costs, which have been outsourced to Oswego County BOCES.

Due to a need for more bandwidth to allow students to simultaneously take state-mandated tests such as the Regents and SATs, all of the computer services are in transition.

Eventually, there will be a savings to justify the doubling of the budget now, but it is an unavoidable cost in today’s competitive education needs.

“Another big cost is for bettering our curriculum,” said Fountain. “Hannibal is in the lowest five percent in New York State in performance. We need to do this. We need a full-time person working on our curriculum development. If this matter is not addressed, we could be looking at being taken over by the state.”

Personnel costs have also increased as well as health benefits offered to employees, but these, too, can be justified by the need to attract quality educators to the school district. Regarding health costs, negotiations with the unions are ongoing to try to decrease the numbers.

To read the rest of the story, pick up a copy of The Valley News or subscribe today by calling 598-6397

In and Around Hannibal: March 30, 2013

Rita Hooper 

706-3564

Twohoops2@juno.com

Tomorrow is Easter Sunday, which is the day Christians celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ.

It is the highest of Holy Days in the Christian world, even of more importance than Christmas which celebrates the birth of Christ.

I have refrained for the many years I have written this column from talking about religion, but for some reason I’m compelled to break that rule for this one column.

I came to Hannibal in 1975. The churches were by no means full even on special occasions. Ecumenically, we shared in Holy Week services and usually in a Lenten Study once a week during this special time of year. It was really a nice way to get to know people in a small group setting. Many churches are struggling now.

Most churches have Sunday Schools and other youth activities even though the majority of church members are older adults. Churches are working hard to transform the church of yesterday into the church of tomorrow while remaining true to the gospel of Jesus Christ.

It is disheartening to see how few people attend church even on special occasions. Even many of our own children have left the church – we hope they have just “gotten out of the habit” and will someday return. Many folks today have never attended church even as children. A number of children coming to church are bought there by their grandparents or great-grandparents.

The mission of the church hasn’t changed in 2000 years: to tell the story of Jesus Christ through thought, word and deed. We don’t believe doing good will get us to Heaven but we try to do good in response for all the good things God has done for us.

We know the church is full of sinners but so is the rest of the world. Those in church acknowledge that they have done wrong and want to do better.

We have all heard why folks don’t come to church even the children of Israel turned away from God and followed their own desires. Yet God, by His grace, kept a remnant for Himself.

There were always some, a few, who chose to be faithful to God. I sometimes feel like I am part of the remnant. I am not afraid to admit that I sometimes need the ‘crutch’ of church, much as I needed a crutch when my knee was replaced and I once needed a cigarette!

I also admit that sometimes I’m weak – but even the strongest among us has broken under pressure! I don’t know many “perfect people” in church with the possible exception of Me!  But then as they say – “God isn’t finished with me yet!”

So what’s the point of all of this?

I see people who supposedly have it all but they don’t seem very happy. I see people who work around the clock with little time for family or friends or to enjoy their hard earned wealth. I see folks with the latest gadgets and the largest collections of things – but they aren’t satisfied.

I see folks who are lonely with few visitors or friends. I see folks who have lots of friends but no one to share their inner thoughts with. I see people whose world seems to be falling apart.

If you find yourself thinking that something is missing in your life – if going it alone hasn’t worked so well for you, why not give going to church a try?

How could it hurt? Come in and sit a spell, enjoy the peace and quiet of the sanctuary (or the loud boom boom of a rock band), the joy of the praises to God in word and song, the tradition of prayer, the fellowship of the people.

I hope you will find a warm welcome. If not remember the church is full of sinners and we are all working our way through life. Come more than once – it may be like eating vegetables when you were a child – take a no thank you portion and it might just grow on you. Hope to see you there!

*  *  *  *  *

Congratulations to Ann Mahaney for her selection as Hannibal Library’s Woman of the Year.  This was a well deserved honor – sorry to have missed the celebration but understand it went very well.

*  *  *  *  *

God’s Vision Christian Church will hold Easter service at 10 a.m. in the sanctuary.

The Hannibal Methodist Church will hold its Easter Sunrise service on the steps of the Church at 7 a.m.

Martville Methodist will hold Easter worship at 9:30 a.m.

Hannibal and Granby Center Methodist Churches will worship together in Hannibal at 11 a.m.

Monday, Wednesday and Friday of spring break, the Hannibal United Methodist Church will be serving a free lunch to any Hannibal Central School student who wishes to attend. Games will also be offered from noon until 2 p.m. Please come and “hang out” with your friends and have lunch. Remember this will be Monday, April 1; Wednesday, April 3; and Friday, April 5 from noon until 2 p.m.

The Senior Nutrition Program meets at the Senior Center, next to the Library on Oswego Street on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Give Rosemary a call and make your reservation now at 564-5471. Can you believe Monday is April Fool’s Day? The center will be serving soup and sandwich that day and that’s a no foolin’. Wednesday will be barbecued pork ribs and baked beans and Friday, Santa Fe rice and black beans.

Also Monday, they will be having their Easter celebration – you just might want to make yourself a bonnet for this special occasion and on Wednesday, Bingo will be breaking out and on Friday, Rosemary will have an art project for those who care to take part.

Hannibal  Dollars for Scholars is hosting a pulled pork barbecue on Sunday, April 7 from noon to 3:30 p.m. at the Hannibal American Legion on Rochester Street in Hannibal. The dinner includes pulled pork with a kaiser roll, cole slaw, salt potatoes, baked beans and dessert. Take-out dinners will be available.  Pre-sale tickets are available. Visit the chapter web site at hannibal.dollarsforscholars.org and e-mail one of the chapter contacts, or phone 564-5630.

Cabin 3 invites will hold a S.O.S. FEST meeting Tuesday, April 16 at 6 p.m. at God’s Vision Christian Church, 326 Church St., Hannibal. S.O.S. FEST is a three-day Christian music festival held at the Hannibal Firemen’s Field July 19-21. Camping is available!

The Friends of the Library have another raffle basket — this time a “Gardening Basket” full of needed supplies. Drawing April 27 at the library.

First United Church of Fulton will be holding a Mission Fair Saturday, April 27 featuring some of the mission activity of our local Cayuga-Syracuse Presbytery. There will be a spaghetti dinner beginning at 5:30 p.m. to benefit your columnist’ mission trip to Appalachia in June. I do hope to see you there.

Start cleaning out your closets, garage and cubby holes – the Hannibal Community Yard Sale will be May 4! The Salvagins have once again agreed to receive information on your sale and print up the list of locations.  They are in the phone book so give them a call! This is one of the good things and a great way to meet your neighbors!