Category Archives: Hannibal News

Big changes in store for Oswego County BOCES CTE program

By Ashley M. Casey

With a $35 million renovation of the Oswego County BOCES complex on the agenda for this summer and some new programs on the way, the Career and Technical Education branch of BOCES is undergoing some big changes for the 2014-15 school year.

CTE Principal Marla Berlin, who took the helm in September 2013, presented an update on the programs’ progress at the Feb. 11 Fulton Board of Education meeting. This academic year, 123 of the county’s 704 CTE students come from the Fulton district.

Berlin, who previously taught business at Mexico High School, said CTE is introducing a STEM academy, two business education programs and “Career Connections,” an effort aimed at disengaged 10th graders.

Career Connections is a half-day exploratory career program that lets 10th graders who are in danger of dropping out of high school experience the various programs CTE has to offer. Berlin said the program’s goal is to “try to hook them into learning” and “bring back that joy of learning.” Although enrollment numbers are not yet final, Berlin said she expects up to 40 students to participate.

Next year, CTE will also eliminate the Floral Design and Greenhouse Technology programs.

“It really was not self-sustaining and not supported by local labor markets,” Berlin told the Fulton school board.

Berlin told The Valley News that current 11th-graders in those programs can continue in different CTE programs next year. She said one student who is interested in opening a floral shop one day may take the new business program, and another botany-minded student may continue in the new STEM academy.

The STEM academy will use scientific inquiry to solve real world problems. Berlin said BOCES has acquired 3-D printers for use in the digital media, STEM and motor sports fabrication programs. Students are using the 3-D printers to design and create objects. She said one of BOCES’ non-3-D printers has a broken component that is no longer made by the printer’s manufacturer.

“Our students are working with CAD and 3-D printers to design … and replicate that part,” Berlin said.

She said BOCES is also looking into buying a 3-D printer that uses chocolate and hard candy for the culinary arts students to create their own confections.

“The kids here think out of the box,” Berlin said. She recalled one student who suggested that BOCES build a mini-fire station for CTE public safety students to practice. “It says a lot about the innovative and creative thinking that kids are inspired to do while they’re here.”

CTE’s programs align with New York state’s new Common Core Learning Standards, which have an emphasis on hands-on, project-based learning and real-world application.

“That’s how they learn, that’s what excites them, and that’s what keeps them in school so they graduate,” Berlin said.

Students in CTE programs are held to industry standards and participate in internships with local companies.

“The success of our internship placement really depends on community support,” Berlin said. “We have excellent rapport (and we’re) making sure our students are knowledgeable, prepared and appropriate for those placements.”

CTE works with Oswego County and the state Department of Labor to keep a finger on the pulse of the county’s job market and place students in fields in which they can find jobs upon graduation.

“It’s not just about placing students just to place them somewhere,” Berlin said. “We truly want to help them move forward in their career path.”

Recently, Oswego’s CTE students won 32 awards in the regional SkillsUSA competition at Morrisville State College. Oswego took the top three spots in collision repair. Many students will go on to the state conference in April at the New York State Fairgrounds in Syracuse.

Despite the whirlwind five months of hard work her new position has brought, Berlin said it has been rewarding.

“It’s all about the kids, watching them learn and their experiences the instructors give them,” she said. “Whenever I get bogged down with paperwork, I walk through the programs. That just makes me smile. They’re looking at their future.”

Legislature OKs appeals lawyer; accepts snowmobile trail maintenance money

By Debra J. Groom

The Oswego County Legislature on Thursday approved hiring an outside lawyer to handle appeals.

District Attorney Gregory Oakes pitched this idea to the legislature during the December 2014 budget hearing. He said an assistant district attorney is his office was spending half of her work time on appeals instead of prosecuting county cases.

County officials have been trying to move cases through the court system quicker in hopes of alleviating overcrowding at the Oswego County jail.

Often, defendants in felony cases are held in jail waiting for their court dates when they can’t make bail, so Oakes and others came up with way to move people through the court system quicker.

The legislature hired Amy L. Hallenbeck, of Johnstown, at $2,600 per appeal. Oakes said during the past 10 years, the office has averaged 10 appeals a year.

Also Thursday, the legislature:

** Passed a resolution in support of allowing crossbow hunting in Oswego County.

** Approved spending $80,000 to replace turbine steam condenser tubes at the Energy Recovery Facility. The facility operates two steam turbine generators to produce electricity and the steam exiting the turbine is cooled by steam condenser that use river water as a cooling medium. The system has been in use for nearly 30 years and the tubes are wearing thin from normal wear and tear.

** Approved naming Dr. Michael S. Nupuf of Oswego to the Oswego County Board of Health. Nupuf is in private practice in internal medicine.

** Approved the transfer of $38,000 for the recruitment and retention of nurses for the Oswego County Health Department’s Certified Home Health Agency and Long Term Home Health Care Program.

** Appointed John FitzGibbons to another term on the Oswego County Board of Ethics. His term will run through Feb. 1, 2017.

** Authorized Chairman Kevin Gardner to enter into agreements in relation to the Snowmobile Trail Development and Maintenance Program and accept $218,365 for use in the 2012-14 snowmobile trail season. The money will be split between 10 county snowmobile clubs who maintain the hundreds of miles of trails in the county.

** Awarded a contract to Miller Consulting Services and Miller Engineers, of Manlius, for $35,020 for consulting work needed prior to the demolition of the old jail on Route 481 across from the current Oswego County Correctional Facility.

** Approved urging New York state to extend or make permanent Real Property Tax Law Section 485, which would allow municipalities to negotiate tax agreements with the owners of nuclear power plants.

** Approved urging New York state to review and amend the taxable status of spent nuclear fuel storage facilities.

February is Black History Month

It is Black History Month, so The Valley News thought it would be good to share some stories of African-American history right here in Oswego County.

Here are a few vignettes:

‘Harlem Hellfighters’ at Fort Ontario.

The Harlem Hellfighters were an all-black military infantry unit during World War I, a group that received high recognition for its heroism and fighting ability.

By the time World War II rolled around, the group from Harlem in New York City now was called the 369th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Regiment. And before shipping out to take on the Japanese in the Pacific, these 1,800 black soldiers did their training at Fort Ontario.

Sure, fighting the Germans would be rough. But the soldiers also got a taste of rough when they arrived in Oswego for training in January 1941. One soldier said he remembers getting off the train in Oswego and they immediately lost a soldier in a mound of snow.

Even though the United States was not yet in the war, training of troops was taking place as President Franklin D. Roosevelt prepared for the worse. The men with the 369th spent eight months at Fort Ontario, practicing anti-artillery drills at the Johnson Farm, an abandoned area east of the fort, where nine Mile Point One is now located.

A history student at SUNY Oswego wrote in 1972 that the men of the 369th often went into Oswego or Syracuse when they were off duty. They would hang out at the Dunbar Social Center in Syracuse and play basketball. They would shop in Oswego and eat at local restaurants.

Adding nearly 1,800 black soldiers to the population changed the demographic makeup of Oswego. In a county of more than 71,000 residents, 55 were black before the soldiers arrived, according to the U.S. Census in 1940. By contrast, Harlem — where most of the men were from — had an 89 percent black population, the 1940 Census shows.

“Outside of Harlem, the issue of race became more immediate for the 369th,” a 1993 article in the Journal of Social History says. “Oswego was, in the words of one member of the 369th, ‘lily white.’

The most famous of the 369th soldiers at Fort Ontario was Lt. John Woodruff, also known as “Long John” Woodruff. He had won the gold medal in the 800 meters at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin.

The 369th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Regiment was at Fort Ontario from Jan. 15 through September, when they shipped out to Massachusetts and then to Hawaii.

During World War II, they engaged in defensive and tactical operations on new Georgia Island, Emirau, Los Negros Island, Admiralty Island, Biak Island, Sansapor New Guinea, Middleburg Island and Morotai Island, all in the Papua New Guinea area of southeast Asia.

Starr Clark Tin Shop

Starr Clark had a business in Mexico in the 1850s – a tin shop making stove pipes and other pieces of tin wear.

But in addition to the tin work, Clark and his family also used their house to shelter runaway slaves as they made their way north to freedom in Canada.

The tin shop building, on Main Street (Route 104), still exists and has since been renovated into a museum to mark Mexico’s importance along the Underground Railroad.

Judith Wellman, a professor emerita at the State University College at Oswego and expert on U.S. African-American history, researched the building’s role in the Underground Railroad. Her work produced enough evidence to have the tin shop named to the National Register of Historic Places in 2001. She said it is one of the best documented Underground Railroad sites.

Oswego Public Library

Gerrit Smith, the famous abolitionist who lived in Peterboro, Madison County, provided the money for construction of  the Oswego Public Library.

But he had two conditions to providing the money. One was that the library must be on the east side of the Oswego River. And the second is that the library should be open to everyone, regardless of his or her race or complexion.

According to the library’s history on its website, the library has had “African-American patrons including prominent members of the Underground Railroad and the local community.” Records kept on who was borrowing books from the library show that many African-American families used the library during its first years, the history states.

Grant – dentist, patented golf tee 

The Tudor E. Grant family was a well-known African-American family in Oswego. Tudor Grant’s son, George Franklin, who was born in Oswego, made a name for himself in later life, becoming the second African American to graduate from Harvard’s dental college. He later became a faculty member of his alma mater and was a leader in the treatment of cleft palates.

But he also is renowned in the sports world. He received the first patent for the wooden golf tee.

Bristol Hill Church, Volney

This church on Route 3 had many white and African-American members dating to the early and mid-1800s. The church was built in the 1830s and is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Case House in Fulton

The Case House on South First Street in Fulton was well known for the Underground Railroad activity that took place there. It is at the site where the old Elks Lodge was located.

Interracial Couple in Fulton

In a book titled “the American Prejudice Against Color,” William Allen, a college professor who says he was one-quarter African American, tells the story of how he fell in love with a white girl in Fulton, became engaged to marry her and the prejudice they encountered due to their engagement.

In fact, an angry mob of Fulton-area residents who did not want this marriage to take place went after Allen.

“Tar, feathers, poles, and an empty barrel spiked with shingle nails had been prepared for my especial benefit; and, so far as I was concerned, it must be escape or death,” Allen wrote in his book.

He wrote that a mob of 400 to 500 people came looking for him after they learned of his engagement to Miss King. He wrote “Reader, the life of a colored man in America, save as a slave, is regarded as far less sacred than that of a dog. There is no exaggeration in this statement—I am not writing of exceptions.”

Allen and King were eventually married in New York City and then left for Europe.

There are many other stories about African Americans in Oswego County at http://visitoswegocounty.com/historical-info/underground-railroad/ . The county had its own Anti-Slavery Society and was known as a hotbed of abolitionist action.

Hannibal, Phoenix compete in track championships

By Rob Tetro

The Hannibal and Phoenix boys’ and girls’ varsity indoor track teams took part in The Class B, Section 3 Championships Feb. 6 at SRC Arena at Onondaga Community College.

Hannibal’s girls’ varsity indoor track team earned a fifth place overall finish. The Warriors boys’ varsity indoor track team finished in seventh place overall.

The Phoenix girl’s varsity indoor track team placed seventh overall while the boys’ from Phoenix came in with a fourth place overall finish.

Hannibal girls

In the Girls 55 Meter Dash, Hannibal’s Tayler Dence placed third at 7.69 seconds. Dence had another successful showing in the 300 Meter Dash, where she placed fourth at 45.67 seconds.

In the Girls 100 Meter Run, eighth-grader Reilly Harris finished second with a time of 3:24.5 while Kristen D’Angelo came in seventh at 3:29.56. Harris was also impressive in the Girls 1500 Meter Run where she placed eighth with a time of 5:20.42.

In the Girls 300 Meter Run, Michaela Sheldon placed sixth at 12:02.89.

Perhaps one of most memorable moments for Hannibal’s Tayler Dence was still yet to come. Her time of 9.75 seconds earned her The Class B, Section 3 Championship in the Girls 55 Meters Hurdles event.

Led by Paige LaFurney, Katherine Martinez, Rebekah Mills and Kasi Blanchard, the Lady Warriors earned an eighth place finish in the Girls 4 x 200 Relay with a time of 2:17.32.

In the Girls 4 x 400 Meter Relay, Kasi Blanchard, Paige LaFurney, Rebekah Mills and Michaela Sheldon led Hannibal to seventh place at 5:17.49.

Led by Reilly Harris, Kristen D’Angelo, Rebekah Mills and Michaela Sheldon, the Lady Warriors clinched fourth in the 4 x 800 Meter Relay at 11:12.60. Kristen D’Angelo placed fifth with a distance of 14-08.75 in the Girls Long Jump.

Phoenix girls

The Phoenix girls’ varsity indoor track team had its fair share of success as well.

In the Girls 600 Meter Run, Haylie Virginia finished fourth at 1:48.73. Destiny Teel placed 12th with a time of 10.59 seconds the Girls 55 Meter Hurdles.

Led by Brandi Ashley, Destiny Maybe, Amanda Deryke and Alexis Gabrielle, the Lady Firebirds placed seventh in the Girls 4 x 2000 Meter Relay with a time of 2:15.50. In the Girls 4 x 800 Meter Relay, Meghan Lantz, Brianna Ball, Emma Brunell and Emilie Schneider led Phoenix to eighth with a time of 12:58.01.

In the Girls High Jump, Haylie Virginia placed fifth with a distance of 4-08.00. Destiny Teel placed second in the Girls Pole Vault at 8-06.00.

It seems Haylie Virginia saved her best for last. With a distance of 16-04.00, Virginia earned the Sectional Championship in The Girls Long Jump Event.

Hannibal boys

It was another stellar effort by the Hannibal boys’ varsity indoor track team.

In the Boys 600 Meter Run, Ben Slate placed seventh at 1:34.73. Slate later won the Sectional Championship in the Boys 1000 Meters with a time of 2:44.12.

In the Boys 1600 Meter Run, Jason McFarland finished sixth at 5:12.07. McFarland was also solid in the Boys 3200 Meter Run, finishing third at 10:29.36.

In the Boys 55 Meter Hurdles Event, Sean Lange earned ninth place with a time of 9.86 seconds. Led by Ben Raymond, Jared Mason, Austin Cooper and John Motell, the Warriors took fifth in the Boys 4 x 200 Meter Relay with a time of 1:46.70.

In The 4 x 400 Meter Relay, Ben Raymond, Blake Farnham, Austin Cooper and Sean Lange led Hannibal to seventh place at 4:04.93. The Warriors capped off the event by taking third in the Boys 4 x 800 Meter Relay, with Austin Baker, Jason Mc Farland, John Motell and Ben Slate posting a time of 9:14.94.

Phoenix boys

It was also a very impressive day for The Phoenix boys indoor track team.

In the Boys 600 Meter Run, Mike Leach placed fifth at 1:33.55. Following Leach was Anthony Brienza who finished eighth at 1:36.76.

With a time of 3:00.96, Eric Hillpot came in fifth in the Boys 1000 Meter Run.

In the Boys 3200 Meter Run, Mike Girard placed sixth at 11:30.91. Dylan Switzer placed sixth in the Boys 55 Meter Hurdles with a time of 9.41 seconds.

The team of Mike Leach, Anthony Brienza, Sean Madden and Dylan Switzer took third in the Boys 4 x 400 Meter Relay with a time of 3:44.60. The Firebirds were also stellar in the Boys 4 x 600 Meter Relay with Mike Leach, Eric Leach, Mike Girard and Anthony Brienza placing second in a time of 9:14.86.

Eric Hillpot won the Sectional Champions in the Boys High Jump with jump of  5-08.00. In the pole vault, Andy Padula came in second with a height of 12-00.00.

The Firebirds also had a decent showing in the Boys Long Jump, with Andy Padula in second with a distance of 18-11.00. Teammate Sean Madden came in fourth with a jump of 18-06.00 and Dylan Switzer placed eighth with a distance of 17-08.50.

The day concluded with another Sectional Championship for a Phoenix athlete, as Andy Padula won the Sectional Championship in the Boys Triple Jump with a distance of 41-02.50.

Hannibal girls’ hoops close season strongly

By Rob Tetro

The Hannibal girls’ varsity basketball team won 3 out of its last 4 games of the regular season, finishing a 11-6 campaign.

On Feb. 1, Hannibal knocked off Solvay, 44-35. The Lady Warriors rolled past Jordan-Elbridge, 60-27 on Feb. 3.

On Feb. 7, Hannibal fell to county rival, Altmar-Parish-Williamstown, 50-38. The wrapped up  the year with a win over Cazenovia, 46-41 on Feb. 11.

Hannibal and Solvay were tied at 9 after the first quarter of their game. Solvay pulled ahead in the second and took a 4-point lead at the half.

The Lady Warriors then took control of the game in the third quarter, outscoring  Solvay by 15 points to take an 11-point lead. Solvay couldn’t overtake the lead Hannibal had put on the board so the Lady Warriors won by 9 points.

Leading the way for the Lady Warriors was Devin Sorell with 20 points, followed by Spencer Kenney with 9, Sydney Alton with 7, McKenzie Mattison with 5 and Rachel Shute with 3.

The Lady Warriors pounded Jordan-Elbridge Feb. 3, with Devin Sorell scoring 22 points. Gabby Griffin scored 13, followed by McKenzie Mattison with 11 and Sarah Otis with 6.

A-P-W was trailing Hannibal after the first quarter of its game and then Hannibal doubled its lead for a score of 22-16 at the half.

But then, A-P-W began pouring it on, outscoring he Lady Warriors by 8 points in the third quarter and 10 points in the fourth quarter for the 50-38 win.

Leading the way for A-P-W were Devin Jones and Kylee Bartlett, who scored 11 points each against Hannibal. Following Jones and Bartlett was Katie Palmer with 9, Alexis Stevens with 8 and Erin Stever with 7.

Hannibal was led by Devin Sorell with 17 points, followed by Sydney Alton, Spencer Kenney and McKenzie Mattison with 5 points each. Gabby Griffin added 4 points.

Hannibal stormed past Cazenovia in the season finale, but the two teams were tied at 13 after the first quarter.

Caz pulled ahead during the second quarter, outscoring the Lady Warriors by 2 points to take a 24-22 lead into halftime.

Hannibal took care of business during the second half, outscoring Caz by 4 points in the third quarter and 3 points in the fourth quarter to win 46-41.

Leading the way for Hannibal was Devin Sorell with 24 points, followed by Spencer Kenney with 9, McKenzie Mattison with 6, Sydney Alton with 3 and Gabby Griffin added 3.

Hannibal-based hard rock band works on first full-length album

Hannibal-based hard rock band Far From Over is becoming more well known in the music business, rubbing elbows with nationally known artists and working on a full-length album.

The band is set to play at Monirae’s Restaurant in Pennellville 6:30 p.m. Feb. 13. Far From Over joins national recording artist Buckcherry and other local bands.

Started as a cover band in 2011 by drummer Zane Pointon, bassist Alex Carter and guitarist Tyler Battist, Far From Over welcomed vocalist Zac Birdslow in 2012. Pointon, Carter and Battist attend Hannibal High School, and Birdslow is taking classes at Cayuga Community College.

The show with Buckcherry is not Far From Over’s first time rubbing elbows with some of rock radio’s biggest stars. Last year, the band played at 95X Fest 2013, which featured acts such as Sick Puppies and Adam Gontier, formerly of the band Three Days Grace.

“95X-Fest was a blast! It was so amazing to be able to hang out backstage and talk with the other bands,” Pointon said in an email.

He cited Gontier and Sick Puppies as influences of the band.

“We tend to blend both modern rock sound and the newer post-hardcore genres into our own work,” Pointon said.

Far From Over began gaining local exposure when a 95X DJ played their music on his show.

“Scott Dixon has always been a huge help to us and the whole Syracuse music scene. I don’t think there is one thing he cares more about then this music scene,” Pointon said. “Dixon does a show on 95X called ‘Locals Only.’ Bands all throughout Syracuse can submit their music to be played.”

Having released the “Burn” EP in 2012, Far From Over is working on their first full-length album. The video for the band’s newest single, “Tonight,” has reached more than 1,600 views on YouTube.

“ Filming the music video was a lot of fun and a great experience. It was all produced by our bassist, Alex,” Pointon said. “Being able to make the video for free and on our own was awesome but it was a lot more work. Our bassist stayed up for nights reviewing the shots and making the final edit.”

The band is trying to raise money for recording the new album on fundraising website Indiegogo.

“Like most local bands we make close to nothing. So funding our production and buying are merch can sometimes be hard,” Pointon said.

Despite the challenges of finding funds and juggling work, school and music, Pointon said Far From Over allows him and his bandmates to do what they love.

“We plan to just keep growing bigger in hope of turning from a local act to a touring national one day,” Pointon said. “Our new musical style is just what this world is asking for and we’re ready for the next step.”

Presale tickets for the Feb. 13 show are $25 and can be purchased at ticketweb.com, Monirae’s or the Sound Garden in Armory Square, Syracuse.

For more information about Far From Over, visit ffoband.com or like the band on Facebook at facebook.com/ffoband.

County health clinic schedule for week of Feb. 10

Submitted by Oswego County

The Oswego County Health Department offers a variety of services to all residents of Oswego County, including preventive health services, certified home health care, long-term home health care, certified hospice, and a maternal and child health program.

Walk-in influenza clinics are held weekdays from 9 to 11 a.m. and 1 to 3 p.m. at the Nick Sterio Public Health Clinic, 70 Bunner St., Oswego for people age 19 and older. No appointment is needed; walk-ins are welcome.

Children’s flu vaccine is now available every Tuesday from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. in Oswego, and the third Tuesday of every month from 9 to 11 a.m. at the H. Douglas Barclay Courthouse, Pulaski.

The children’s flu vaccine is available at no cost to all children who qualify for the Vaccines for Children Program provided by the state Department of Health.

For those who do not qualify, the cost is $37 for the inactivated vaccine (the shot) and $43 for the flu-mist (nasal vaccine).

Patients with private insurance, Managed Medicaid, Managed Medicare, Medicaid, Medicare, and Medicare Part B should bring their benefit cards with them to the immunization clinic.

No one will be turned away due to inability to pay.

The following services will be offered during the week of Feb. 10 at the Nick Sterio Public Health Clinic, 70 Bunner St., Oswego.

OSWEGO:

** Adult Influenza Clinic: Monday through Friday, 9 to 11 a.m. and 1 to 3 p.m., walk-in clinic.

** Immunization Clinic: Tuesday, Feb. 11, 12:30 to 3:30 p.m., walk-in clinic.

** Pregnancy Testing: Free pregnancy testing is available. Call 349-3391 to schedule an appointment.

** Sexually Transmitted Disease Testing and Treatment Services: Call 349-3547 to schedule an appointment.

** HIV Counseling and Testing Service:  Call 349-3547 to schedule an appointment

Immunization clinics are held every Tuesday from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. at 70 Bunner St, Oswego, and the third Tuesday of every month from 9 to 11 a.m. at the H. Douglas Barclay Courthouse, Pulaski.

For more information about public health services, contact the Oswego County Health Department, weekdays at 349-3547 or (800) 596-3200, ext. 3547.

Do something nice the week of Feb. 10

SUNY Oswego is bringing a warm front to the February cold spell and invites the community to celebrate National Random Acts of Kindness Week.

From Feb. 10 – Feb. 14, those on SUNY Oswego campus and middle school students in Altmar-Parish-Williamstown, Fulton, Mexico, Oswego, Phoenix and Sandy Creek school districts will be receiving Random Acts of Kindness cards to Go.Do.Good. around the community.

Businesses will receive a page of cards to print for their employees to join in the fun through an Oswego-Fulton Chamber of Commerce email.

A Facebook page, “Oswego Random Acts of Kindness” was created for all Oswego County community members to record the acts of kindness and pay tribute to the Go.Do.Good.-ers.

SUNY Oswego campus good-doers will perform a Random Act of Kindness, fill in their name on the card and leave it at the scene of the good deed with the receiver.

The receiver will fill in their name and a description of the good deed and return the card to one of the designated drop boxes on campus.

Both the giver and receiver will be entered in drawings for to win a prize.

“And the fun doesn’t stop there;” says organizer Tammy Elowsky. “At the drop box, the receiver can pick up a new Random Acts of Kindness card to Go.Do.Good. for someone else.  It’s all about paying it forward and building community.”

Each participating middle school will have its own way of recognizing these good-doing bandits at its school.

The community at large is invited to join in the fun, spread the kindness, and celebrate our community by using the card printed here and just Go.Do.Good.

Then, post the stories in Facebook on “Oswego Random Acts of Kindness” and tell the community where it happened and tag who was responsible.

Spread the kindness fever!

This is an effort by the Office of Business and Community Relations in collaboration with the Counseling Services Center at SUNY Oswego, several Oswego County school districts and the Oswego-Fulton Chamber of Commerce to promote collaboration, trust and the sharing of ideas to spark innovation as a part of the Thrive Community Incubator Initiative.

For more information on Thrive, go to: www.oswego.edu/thrive.

To print your own Go.Do.Good. card to leave at the scene of a random act of kindness, join the Facebook page:  Oswego Random Acts of Kindness and print the image there.