Category Archives: Hannibal News

Hannibal boys’ basketball ends season with 6-12 record

By Rob Tetro

The Hannibal boys’ varsity basketball team went 2-2 in its last 4 games of the regular season and ended with a 6-12 record.

Hannibal fell to Jordan-Elbridge, 62-48, on Feb. 4. However, The Warriors cruised past county foe Altmar-Parish-Williamstown, 63-49, on Feb. 6.

On Feb. 8, Cazenovia beat Hannibal, 74-48. The Warriors knocked off Altmar-Parish-Williamstown again Feb. 11, 54-43.

J-E had a 3-point lead over Hannibal after the first quarter of their game, but the Warriors came back, outscoring J-E in the second quarter. Yet J-E still had a 2-point lead at the half.

Jordan-Elbridge added to its lead during the third quarter and then pulled away in the fourth quarter to seal the win.

Leading the way for the Warriors was Trevor Alton with 27 points, followed by Billy Skipper with 13 and Zane Pointon added 6.

Against A-P-W, the Warriors and Rebels were tied at 18 after the first quarter. Hannibal took over in the second, outscoring A-P-W by 20 points to take a 43-23 lead into the half.

The Warriors extended their lead during the third quarter, outscoring A-P-W by another 7 points. But the Rebels weren’t done and came back in the fourth quarter, outscoring Hannibal by 13 points. But it wasn’t enough to overtake Hannibal for the win.

Altmar-Parish-Williamstown was led by Tom Canfield with 14 points, followed by Masto Wada with 10, Sage Bartlett with 9, Baron Correll with 6 and Austin Lacelle and Jarid Paninski added 3 points each.

Leading the way for the Warriors was Trevor Alton with 22, followed by Sam McCraith with 16, Billy Skipper with 8 and Zane Pointon and Austin Mattison chipped in 6 points each.

In the Cazenovia game, the Lakers quickly built an early lead in the first quarter and built on it in the second to lead 30-23 at the half.

Caz expanded its lead during the third quarter, outscoring the Warriors by 7 points to extend its lead to 14 points. The Lakers put the game out of reach during the fourth quarter and won 74-48.

Hannibal was led by Trevor Alton with 19 points, followed by Sam McCraith and Billy Skipper with 9 points each. Austin Mattison added 6 points.

The Warriors and the Rebels went at it again Feb. 11, the second time they met in five days.

A-P-W jumped out to an 11-3 lead over the Warriors during the first quarter. But Hannibal got right back into it during the second quarter, outscoring the Rebels by 9 points to take a slim 1-point advantage into the half.

The Warriors built on their lead during the third quarter, outscoring A-P-W by 6 points and then didn’t let up in the fourth quarter to end with an 11-point win.

Leading the way for Altmar-Parish-Williamstown was Sage Bartlett with 20 points, followed by Masto Wada with 8, Baron Correll and Jarid Paninski scored 6 points each and Kenny Benedetto added 3 points.

Hannibal was led by Billy Skipper with 14 points, followed by Charlie McCraith and Trevor Alton with 12 points each, Zane Pointon with 8 and Sam McCraith and Austin Mattison combined to score 8 points for the Warriors.

What does Cuomo’s tax rebate plan really mean?

By Debra J. Groom

In his 2014-15 state budget presentation, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said he will provide $1 billion for property tax relief.

At a recent Oswego County Legislature meeting, Oswego County Administrator Philip Church broke down the proposal on what it would mean for Oswego County residents.

In a 13-page analysis, Church said there are many unanswered questions as to how this tax relief will work and how it will be funded.

He said using the county’s tax levies (the amount raised by taxes) for operations, community college and workers compensation, residents with an average Oswego County home valued at $94,500 would receive a rebate of about $16.

And because the tax relief would affect all taxing jurisdictions (county, town, city, village, school districts), the full rebate would be less than $74.

This would be a two-year rebate, Church said.

He believes the state should take the money Cuomo wants for tax relief and instead of one-time rebates, put it toward permanent mandate relief.

This mandate relief would be reducing the cost of programs the state makes the county pay each year. Church said this would help taxpayers by reducing their property tax burden permanently.

“Many counties and the New York State Association of Counties are proposing this alternative method to provide property tax reductions to New Yorkers,” Church wrote in his analysis.

“The alternative consists of the state taking over the costs of four of its own programs: Medicaid, indigent defense, preschool special education and Safety Net,” he said.

Church said if the state paid for these programs, the reductions to the average Oswego County taxpayer’s bill would be about $514.

He also believes if the state pays for the programs itself, it would be forced to reform services.

Other problems with Cuomo’s tax rebate plan, according to Church:

** It is only temporary

** Rebates are reportable as income on federal income tax returns, “diminishing the overall financial benefit,” he writes.

** The cost of implementing the rebate program isn’t known. Church said the state will use tax levy data to compute the rebates and “the bureaucracy needed to collect, record and organize all tax levy date in the state” and then determine each homeowner’s eligibility and tax rebate will be large and a large cost to taxpayers.

** The state is operating now on tax levy data from 2012, stating this is the most recent data the state has. “How will the state be able to calculate rebates on a current year tax levy with any reasonable assurance to taxpayers that is was done accurately and fairly?” he writes.

** For homeowners to receive a rebate in the second year, the county must develop and submit plans to the state by June 2015 concerning consolidation and shared services. The county cannot use in its plan any consolidations or shared services it has already completed. He estimates Oswego County would have to come up with about $7.2 million in savings through its consolidation/shared services plan if all tax jurisdictions in the county participated.

** In order for a municipality to participate in the tax freeze rebate program, it cannot adopt a precautionary waiver of the state’s 2 percent tax cap. Oswego County adopts the waiver each year due to the ongoing tax status negotiations with Entergy for the FitzPatrick nuclear plant in Scriba.

Without the waiver, taxpayers could be left having to come up with millions of dollars in penalties if a tax settlement for Entergy greatly changed previous years county tax levies.

So participating in the tax rebate program would pose a large risk for Oswego County, Church said.

Legislature Minority Leader Michael Kunzwiler, D-Oswego, said he believes  Cuomo’s idea to push for more shared services and consolidation is good, especially as it get more people talking about the issue.

“If this stirs things up, that’s good,” he said.

He disagreed with Church’s emphasis on state mandate relief, stating Church for too long has been singing this same song.

“Phil has to stop pointing the finger and srart looking in the mirror,” Kunzwiler said. “Phil’s top worry is about what the state is doing — instead we should start cleaning up our own house.”

2 local National Guard troops reenlist

Major General Patrick A. Murphy, the Adjutant General, said a number of New York Army National Guard troops have reenlisted as members of the Army National Guard.

Two are local. They are:

Staff Sgt. Brett Janes from Cato,  has reenlisted to continue service with the Company F, 1-169th General Support Aviation Battalion.

Sgt. Eric Shaffer from Phoenix, has reenlisted to continue service with the Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 102nd Military Police Battalion.

“The New York Army National Guard has sustained our force at or above 100 percent strength for the better part of five years now,” Murphy said.

“Keeping those ready forces in our ranks means that New York is ready to provide forces for state missions here at home, as we saw during Hurricane Sandy or for the federal missions supporting our nation around the country and around the world.”

Jessica Rocheleau, Andrew Fadden plan August wedding

Karl and Cheryl Rocheleau of St. Albans, Vt., along with Charles and Karen Fadden of Hannibal, N.Y., are delighted to announce the engagement of their children, Jessica Ann Rocheleau and Andrew Charles Fadden.

Jessica is a 2004 graduate of Bellows Free Academy in St. Albans and received her bachelor and master of science degrees in civil engineering from Clarkson University in Potsdam, N.Y.

Andrew is a 2003 graduate of Hannibal Central School and received his bachelor of science in electrical engineering from Clarkson University, Potsdam.

Jessica is a structural engineer with C&S Engineers in Syracuse. Andrew is an electrical engineer with TRC Solutions in Liverpool.

An August 2014 wedding is planned in Vermont.

Oswego County to simulcast forage meeting from Geneva

One way to improve cow health and lower production costs is by increasing the forage dairy cows consume.

This is the primary topic of a March 11 New York Certified Organic meeting in Geneva.

Tom Kilcer of Advanced Ag Systems will help farmers review their planting, harvesting and feeding systems to achieve better forage and more profitable dairy production.

Kilcer will make his presentation in person at 10 a.m. at the NYS Agricultural Experiment Station Jordan Hall auditorium in Geneva, and the program will be simulcast to the Cornell Cooperative Extension offices in Oswego, Allegany, Cattaraugus, Jefferson, Lewis, Madison and St. Lawrence counties.

Kilcer will share the latest research on using wide swath haylage harvesting to capture plant nutrients to support dairy cow nutrition. The end goal of using the harvesting technique to produce high quality forage cover crops is to enhance milk production.

Kilcer received two New York Farm Viability Institute grants to evaluate the use of wide swath harvesting to help New York dairies and to reduce weather-related forage crop losses.

Kilcer, with 34 years of experience as a Cornell Cooperative Extension field crops and soils educator, will also share information on rapid dry-down methods for harvesting red clover for dairy cows in his March 11 presentation.

New York Certified Organic, a group of grain and dairy farmers that has been meeting since 1994, is celebrating its 20th anniversary of sharing practical knowledge and expertise with the organic production of crops and milk.

There is no cost to attend NYCO meetings. Participants are asked to bring a dish to pass at the potluck lunch.

For more information, contact NYCO facilitator A. Fay Benson with Cornell Cooperative Extension Cortland County, (607) 753-5213, afb3@cornell.edu.

For more information on the simulcast locations, contact CCE Allegany/Cattaraugus, Tom Parmenter: 585-268-7644, Jefferson/Lewis, Ron Kuck: 788-8450, Madison, Karen Baase: 684-3001, Oswego, JJ Schell: 963-7286, St. Lawrence, Kimberley Morrill: 379-9192.

NYCO has received support funding from the New York Farm Viability Institute.

County health department clinic schedule for the week of Feb. 24

Submitted by Oswego County

The Oswego County Health Department has scheduled a number of health clinics for the week of Feb. 24.

They are:

Walk-in influenza clinics are held weekdays from 9 to 11 a.m. and 1 to 3 p.m. at the Nick Sterio Public Health Clinic, 70 Bunner St., Oswego for people age 19 and older. No appointment is needed; walk-ins are welcome.

Children’s flu vaccine is now available every Tuesday from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. in Oswego, and the third Tuesday of every month from 9 to 11 a.m. at the H. Douglas Barclay Courthouse, Pulaski.

The children’s flu vaccine is available at no cost to all children who qualify for the Vaccines for Children Program provided by the New York State Department of Health. For those who do not qualify, the cost is $37 for the inactivated vaccine.

Patients with private insurance, Managed Medicaid, Managed Medicare, Medicaid, Medicare, and Medicare Part B should bring their benefit cards with them to the immunization clinic.  No one will be turned away due to inability to pay.

The following services will be offered the week of Feb. 24 at the Nick Sterio Public Health Clinic, 70 Bunner St., Oswego.

OSWEGO:

** Adult Influenza Clinic: Monday through Friday, 9 to 11 a.m. and 1 to 3 p.m., walk-in clinic.

** Immunization Clinic: Tuesday, Feb. 25, 12:30 to 3:30 p.m., walk-in clinic.

** Pregnancy Testing: Free pregnancy testing is available. Call 349-3391 to schedule an appointment.

** Sexually Transmitted Disease Testing and Treatment Services: Call 349-3547 to schedule an appointment.

** HIV Counseling and Testing Service:  Call 349-3547 to schedule an appointment

Immunization clinics are held every Tuesday from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. at 70 Bunner St, Oswego, and the third Tuesday of every month from 9 to 11 a.m. at the H. Douglas Barclay Courthouse, Pulaski.

For more information about public health services, contact the Oswego County Health Department, weekdays at 349-3547 or (800) 596-3200, ext. 3547.

Porky and Buddy discuss canine parvovirus

Dear Porky & Buddy,

My next door neighbor came home with a new puppy a few weeks ago that she had gotten from a “free to good home” ad.

I use the word “free” advisedly because a week after the puppy arrived he was at the veterinary hospital with parvo and almost didn’t make it. Now $2,300 later, he is home and I guess OK, but should I be worried?

My kids were playing with him and I have my own (fully vaccinated) dog.

 

Ben

 

Dear Ben,

Ah, the horrors of “free to good home” adoptions.

Many humane societies and rescue organizations are happy to take unwanted  litters of puppies, keep them isolated until their health status can be verified, and then find them good safe homes.

That puppy was lucky that he ended up with someone who could afford the care he needed.

Canine parvovirus is a highly contagious viral disease that can be life-threatening, especially for puppies. It can be transmitted by any person, animal or object that comes in contact with an infected dog’s feces.

The virus can live in the environment for months, and may survive on inanimate objects such as food bowls, shoes, clothes, carpet and floors.

Because of this, you will want to take extra care if the puppy was in your house or yard. Some things are easier to clean and disinfect than others — and even with excellent cleaning, parvovirus can be difficult to eradicate.

Parvo is resistant to many typical disinfectants. A solution of one part bleach to 32 parts water can be used where organic material is not present. The infected dog’s toys, food dish and water bowl should be properly cleaned and then disinfected with this solution for 10 minutes.

If not disinfected, these articles should be discarded. You can also use the solution on the soles of your shoes if you think you’ve walked through an infected area. Areas that are harder to clean (grassy areas, carpeting and wood, for example) may need to be sprayed with disinfectant, or even resurfaced if there is any chance that a susceptible dog will be in that area.

The general symptoms of parvo are lethargy, severe vomiting, loss of appetite and bloody, foul-smelling diarrhea that can lead to life-threatening dehydration.

Puppies, adolescent dogs and canines who are not vaccinated are most susceptible to the virus. (Thank goodness, it cannot be transmitted to people.)

But if you ever notice your dog experiencing severe vomiting, loss of appetite, depression or bloody diarrhea, contact your veterinarian immediately.

Even if your dog is protected from parvo, those are serious symptoms.

The most important thing for pet owners to remember is that you can protect your dog from this potential killer by making sure he’s up-to-date on his vaccinations, and because you have done that you should be OK.

Parvovirus should be considered a core vaccine for all puppies and adult dogs. Consult with your veterinarian about how often your dog will need to be revaccinated.

As your friend found out the hard way, dogs infected with parvovirus need intensive treatment in a veterinary hospital, where they receive antibiotics, drugs to control the vomiting, intravenous fluids and other supportive therapies.

This can result in  considerable expense — the average hospital stay is about 5-7 days. Sadly, treatment is not only expensive, it is not always successful — so it’s especially important for everyone to make sure their dogs are vaccinated.

For a safe adoption, see the Oswego County Humane Society’ pets online at www.oswegohumane.org.

The Oswego County Humane Society provides spay/neuter services and assistance, fostering and adoption of animals in urgent need, humane education programs, and information and referrals to animal lovers throughout Oswego County.

Our office is located at 265 W. First St., Oswego. Phone is 207-1070. Email is ochscontact@hotmail.com  Check out our website at www.oswegohumane.org

Marjorie A. Carter, worked for GE and SUNY Oswego

Marjorie A. Carter, 82, of Hannibal, passed away Monday, Feb. 10 at Michaud Residential Health Services in Fulton.

A native of Boonton, NJ, she resided in Hannibal most of her life. Marjorie retired from SUNY Oswego after 17 years in the custodial maintenance department and previously worked at General Electric in Liverpool.

She was a member of the Hannibal United Methodist Church. Marjorie was a very kind and loving mother to her children, and a gracious woman with a vivacious laugh.

Surviving are her children, Roger (Joyce) Carter Sr., Floyd (Mary Beth) Carter III and Linda (James Pangborn) Remig, all of Hannibal, Gail Fetterly of Oswego, and Susanne Carter of Chittenango; four grandchildren, Barclay Remig, Roger Carter Jr., Michael Sokol and Derek Carter; two brothers, William DeGraw of Long Branch, TX and Roger DeGraw of Boonton, NJ, and several nieces and nephews.

Marjorie was predeceased by her sisters, Shirley Clark and Diane Norris.

Services will be held 11 a.m. on Monday, April 28, at Hannibal United Methodist Church, 320 Church St., Hannibal with graveside services to follow at Hannibal Village Cemetery.

There will be no calling hours.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association CNY Chapter, 441 W. Kirkpatrick St., Syracuse, NY 13204 or to Hannibal United Methodist Church, PO Box 89, Hannibal, NY 13074.

Foster Funeral Home, Hannibal, has care of arrangements.