Category Archives: Hannibal News

Robert “Bart” Bartholomew, Fulton alderman

Robert “Bart” Henry Bartholomew, of Port Charlotte, Fla., passed away April 20, 2014 at the Douglas T. Jacobson State Veterans Nursing Home.

Bart was born June 29, 1931 in Sterling, NY, the son of Gaynelle Leona Albring and Hobart McKinley Bartholomew.

He attended Hannibal and Red Creek schools and enlisted in the U.S. Army 17th Airborne at age 18. A veteran of the Korean War, he served in Guam and Korea from 1949 through 1952. He later served in the Army Reserve and was honorably discharged holding the rank of staff sergeant.

He married Barbara Burton in 1954.  Bart lived in Fulton NY most of life, moving to Sterling NY in 1985 and then to Port Charlotte, FL in 2007.

Bart was active in his church and in his community.  He was a charter member and first physical education director of the Fulton YMCA (1960); and he was a founder and first executive director of the Oswego County Pioneer Land Search and Rescue Team (1971).

He served as scoutmaster and later commissioner of the Boy Scouts of America.  Bart was an ordained elder of the Presbyterian Church USA and, during the 1960s and 1970s, served as a teacher and church school superintendent at the First Presbyterian Church, Fulton, NY.

He also served as an alderman for the city of Fulton’s 6th Ward during the early 1970s.

After moving to Sterling, Bart was a trailblazer and board member for the Friends of Sterling Nature Center.  He also was a member of American Legion Post 658 in Fair Haven, NY, Masonic Lodge #144 Fair Haven, NY and a volunteer with the Fair Haven Fire Department.

He was employed as a millwright most of his life, retiring in 1990.  He owned and operated the Sea-Way Trail Bicycle and Canoe Center from his Sterling home from 1983 through 1990.

Bart especially enjoyed family, camping, canoeing, bicycling, running, cross country skiing and taking part in triathlons.  He also enjoyed clowning; and, as “Ho Ho” the clown, he attended international clown School in Lacrosse, WI and entertained in Upstate New York during the 1980s.

He is survived by his wife of 60 years, Barbara; sons, Mark (Tracey) of Palm Harbor, FL, Dean (Jay Williams) of Brooksville, FL, Richard (Teresa) of Bossier City, LA; John (Nora) of Oswego, NY; five grandchildren; five great grandchildren; twin brother, Richard of Bartow, FL.

He was predeceased by an older brother and three sisters.

Services will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, June 28, 2014 at First United Church of Fulton.

Contributions in his memory may be made to the First United Church of Fulton, 33 S. Third St., Fulton, NY 13069; the Oswego County Land Search and Rescue Team; or the Fair Haven Volunteer Ambulance Company, Fair Haven, NY 13064.

Arrangements are by the National Cremation Society of Port Charlotte, Florida.

Police blotter

From the Fulton police department:

Angela R. Laquire, 34, South Third Street, Fulton, charged with reckless endangerment first degree, a felony, and reckless driving and leaving the scene of a property damange accident.

Police say on March 23, Laquire operated a vehicle thorugh the parking lot of Neighborhood Plaza swerving towards two pedestrians, causing them to jump out of the way to avoid being struck. Police say Laquire then drove south and turned around at the far end of the parking lot and drove towards a single pedestrian, resulting in him jumping into the air, landing ont he hood and windshield of the car.

Police said Laquire left the scene after the accident.

Nicole J. Drinkwine, 27, of Auburn Street, Hannibal, is charged with assault second degree, a felony, and criminal possession of a weapon.

Police say that on April 6, while at Shotz Bar in Fulton, Drinkwine struck a victim with a glass beer bottle in the upper lip and front teeth. The victim suffered a cut to the inside of her upper lip, a chipped and loose front tooth and substantial pain.

From the Oswego County Sheriff’s Office:

A West Monroe man was killed in a car accident in the town of Constantia April 19.

Members of the Oswego County Sheriff’s Office and the Constantia Fire Department responded to Dutcherville Road east of Lewis Road.

The lone occupant of the car, John W. Scrimale,  was operating a Chevrolet Malibu in a westerly direction on Dutcherville Road when he left the roadway then struck a culvert and tree.

Scrimale was pronounced dead at the scene. Deputies said unsafe speed and failure to keep right were contributing factors to the accident. The investigation is continuing.

News in brief

As of April 30, 2014, The Valley News will only accept classified advertisements for the Wednesday and Saturday print editions.

We will no longer publish classifieds online. To submit a classified ad, call us at 598-6397 or visit our office at 67 S. Second St., Fulton.

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The Phoenix Public Library, 34 Elm St., Phoenix, will host an informative program on sweetened beverages presented by Debra A. Hunsbeger, Nutrition Program Educator from Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oswego County.

The program is from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.  Wednesday, April 23 (today) in the Century Club Room.

What does it mean to “Rethink your drink?” Do you know what an empty calorie is?”

Attend this forum for a close look at nutritional labels, an activity involving sugar, some informational handouts and a discussion on empty calories.

Parents are encouraged to attend with their children.

This event is free and open to the public.

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The Pratt House Museum, at 177 S. First St., Fulton, is hosting a program from 7 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, April 23 (today).

The speaker will be Mercedes Niess,  executive director of the H. Lee White Marine Museum in Oswego.

She will talk about the H. Lee White museum programming for this season, celebrating the 80th Anniversary of the lighthouse in Oswego and an art exhibit which will start at the Canal Museum in Syracuse, then move to Phoenix, then Fulton, and ending in Oswego.

Admission is free.

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Registration for kindergarten and pre-kindergarten is taking place April 24 at all four Fulton elementary schools.

Times for registration are from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and from 4 to 7 p.m.

Please bring the following information to the registration: an original birth certificate for the child (with the raised seal); up-to-date immunization record and proof of residency.

Children who turn 5 years old by Dec. 1 are eligible to register for kindergarten.

Those turning 4 years old by Dec. 1 can register for Universal Pre-Kindergarten.

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There will be early dismissal for Fulton school district students in grades pre-kindergarten through 6 on Friday April 25.

The students are being dismissed due to parent-teacher conferences being held that day.

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A fundraiser for the Fulton Jazz Festival is scheduled for 6 to 9 p.m. Wednesday April 23 (today) at Under the Moon in Canal Landing, Fulton.

The event will include great music, food and fun.

Space is limited. Register by calling 343-7681 or going online to oswegofultonchamber.com

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The Granby Center Fire Department will have its annual free open house April 26.

There will be a vehicle extrication drill for the public to view and also a tour of the firehouse. Everyone is welcome.

The event, held in conjunction with the Fire Association of the State of New York’s RecruitNY event, is 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 1400 County Route 8.

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The Oswego Festival Chorus, conducted by SUNY Oswego assistant professor Mihoko Tsutsumi, will present its spring concert at 7:30 p.m. Monday, April 28 at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, West Seventh Street, Oswego.

Admission is by donation. The chorus will perform Felix Mendelssohn’s “Psalm 42,” featuring soloist Nancy James, Sergei Rachmaninoff’s “Rejoice O’ Virgin,” Ola Gjeilo’s “The Ground” and Moses Hogan’s “Ride On, King Jesus.”

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University Police at SUNY Oswego will have special patrols out looking for motorists who are not wearing their seat belts now through May 4.

The patrols are part of the nationwide “Buckle-Up Day and Night” campaign.

Motorists increase their chance of survival in a crash by 60 percent by wearing a seat belt and don’t have to worry about being stopped by the police or receiving a ticket.

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Oswego County BOCES Deaf and Hard of Hearing Club is hosting a Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Kids Walk for Type 1 Diabetes at 9 a.m. Saturday, April 26 at the Mexico High School outdoor track.

There is a $5 fee for the walk, or $20 donation for a team of five. Registration opens at the track at 8:30 a.m. on the day of the walk.

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The Fun Fling 2014 Luau Tropical Paradise is scheduled for 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 26 at St. Paul’s Church, Oswego.

Tropical fun for all ages, games, activities and prizes. Cake and variety booths will have a wheel for spinning. Treats will be available to eat in or take out.

A chicken barbecue will be offered and will include macaroni salad, salt potatoes, roll and dessert. Game tickets are 25 cents each, and each game will require 1-4 tickets. There also will be a drawing for prizes. Tickets are $1 each.

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The annual chicken barbecue sponsored By Friends of History in Fulton is at 11:30 a.m. until sold out Sunday May 4 at the Pavilion at Bullhead Point.

The barbecue benefits the John Wells Pratt House Museum, local history museum, at 177 S. First St., Fulton. Eat in or take out.

For advance sale tickets, call 598-4616.

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Palermo TOPS 758 will have a free open house for the public at 10 a.m. Tuesday May 6 at the Palermo Methodist Church on County Route 35.

Information will be shared about TOPS, weight loss and support.

For more informations, call Kristal at 676-7021.

Evening college fair set for April 28

The Oswego County Counselors Association (OsCCA) in conjunction with SUNY Oswego conducting an evening college fair from 6 to 8 p.m. April 28 in the SUNY Oswego Campus Center.

Lisa Roman, Oswego High School counselor and president of the Oswego County Counselors Association, said she is “excited to partner with SUNY Oswego to offer our families in Oswego County an opportunity to talk with college admissions representatives. “

“We are hoping that providing an evening college fair in Oswego County will encourage students and their parents to take advantage of this opportunity to learn more about colleges of interest,” she said.

Every October, the Oswego County Counselors Association organizes a daytime college fair for students hosted by Cayuga Community College.

Each high school in Oswego County buses students to Cayuga Community College’s Fulton campus, where college representatives meet with interested students.

However, this spring event hosted at SUNY Oswego will be the first evening college fair in the immediate Oswego County area.

Dan Griffin, director of admissions at Oswego State, feels the timing is right for students beginning their college search.

“Now more than ever higher education is a family affair,” he said.  “Hosting this event in the evening will hopefully provide the opportunity for families to begin the process together.”

To that end, all age groups are welcome to attend.

More than 60 colleges and universities are expected to be in attendance at College Night April 28, with college admissions representatives available to answer questions from students and their families.

In addition, two 30-minute information sessions will be offered giving advice on how to navigate the college application process, and a financial aid table will be staffed by SUNY Oswego financial aid experts.

For more information, including the latest list of participating colleges, visit www.oswego.edu/collegenight.

Winners announced for Oswego County Student Art Competition

Grade 10-12th winners, from left, Holly Griffith, show chairperson; third place Caleb Lacson;, second place Kathy Pittorf; first place Carrie Gilbert; best of show Brenna Riley.
Grade 10-12th winners, from left, Holly Griffith, show chairperson; third place Caleb Lacson;, second place Kathy Pittorf; first place Carrie Gilbert; best of show Brenna Riley.

The student art work in the annual Oswego County Student Art Competition and Show was better than ever this year.

The variety and degree of skill in the 275 pieces of art in this show demonstrates the talent in the area’s high schools.

Awards were presented in two categories: Grades 7-9 and Grades.

The award for Best of Show — the Vernon E. Snow Award, went to Brenna Riley, Oswego High School, for “Oliver.” Melissa Martin is her teacher.

The awards for Grades 7-9 were:

First place — Ethan Murakumi-Hamm, Dillon Middle, Phoenix, for “Paintbox; second place — Brandi Maynes, Mexico Middle School, for “Hearts That Love;”  third place — Tom McDonald, Mexico Middle School, for “Angry Pablo.”

Honorable mentions for grades 7-9 were:

Allayna Frank, Altmar-Parish-Williamstown Junior/Senior High; Bryson russell, Mexico Middle; Madelyne Cortright and Jessica Godden, Oswego Middle School; Marissa Familo-Bennett and Mikayla Trepaso, Oswego High School; Victoria Dievendorf, Corinne Januszka, Breanna Mitchel, Haley Stellingwerf and Leila wooding, Dillon Middle in Phoenix; Ciera Bell and Chloe Koegel, John C. Birdlebough High in Phoenix; Ruth Van Der Heide, McKenna Moonan and Jenna Norton, Pulaski Junior/ Senior High School.

 Grade 7-9 honorable mentions, from left: Allayna Frank, APW; Jessica Godden, Oswego; Leila Wooding, Phoenix; McKenna Moonan, Pulaski; and Ruth van der Heide, Pulaski.
Grade 7-9 honorable mentions, from left: Allayna Frank, APW; Jessica Godden, Oswego; Leila Wooding, Phoenix; McKenna Moonan, Pulaski; and Ruth van der Heide, Pulaski.

The awards for Grades 10-12 were:

First place — Carrie Gilbert, Oswego High School, for “Clarinet;” second place — Kathy Pittorf, Hannibal High School, for “Still Life with Skull;” third place — Caleb Lacson, home schooled, for “Speckles of Youth.”

Honorable mentions for grades 10-12 were:

Brianna Logee, Pennellsville, homeschooled; Katelyn Metzger, Paul V. Moore High School, Central Square; Erika Brinkerhoff, Samantha Moody, Allison Sharkey, Carolina Nicol, Hans Reichow and Erin Sly, Hannibal High School; Katie Bradshaw, Danielle Boyzuck, Makayla Carson, Aviriana Follet, Carrie Gilbert, Sarah Hoefer, Morgan Knoop, Rebecca North, Teo Patty and Kayla Volkomer, Oswego High School; and Sarah Clark and Alaura Gonzolez, Pulaski High School.

The Sally Deaton Memorial Award went to Mikayla Trepasso, Oswego High School, for “Poison Blueberry” in the grade 7-9 category; and to Jessica Jones, Birdlebough High in Phoenix, for “A Walk Through the 100-Acre Wood.”

The Darcy Hilton Award went to Victoria Dievendorf, Dillon Middle School, Phoenix, for “Portrait of My Brother.”

Judges for this show were professional artists Ingrid Aldrich and Amanda Muto. The show is open until April 26.

The Salmon River Fine Arts Center, Pulaski, is a nonprofit organization committed to enriching our community by engaging the energy and creativity of local artists, by sharing and displaying fine arts, and by offering programs to enhance creativity and learning for the novice as well as the gifted artist.

Gallery hours are noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday; 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday.

Call 298-7007 for more information or go to www.SalmonRiverFineArtsCenter.com or www.facebook.com/SalmonRiverFineArtsCenter

Open burning banned now

Oswego County Fire Coordinator Donald Forbes reminds county residents of the annual statewide ban on all open burning.

The ban took effect March 16 and will remain in effect through May 14, during the high fire-risk period.

The ban makes it illegal to use a burn barrel or open pits as a means for incinerating trash. The burning of leaves is also banned in New York state.

Agricultural burns are allowed and there are certain circumstances when controlled burns, with a written permit from the state Department of Environmental Conservation are permissible.

“The risk of brush fires is most prevalent at this time of year due to the lack of green vegetation, abundance of available fuels such as dry grass and leaves, warmer temperatures, and wind,” said Forbes.

On-site burning of limbs and branches between May 14 and the following March 15 in any town with a total population less than 20,000 is permissible, however, individual municipalities can pass ordinances that are stricter than, and not inconsistent with, the open fires regulations.

Forbes encourages residents to check with their local authorities to find out if local law requires a permit or prohibits open fires.

State regulation prohibits all open burning except for the following:

• Campfires less than 3 feet in height and 4 feet in length, width or diameter

• Small cooking fires

• Ceremonial or celebratory bonfires

• Fires cannot be left unattended and must be fully extinguished

• Only charcoal or clean, dry, untreated or unpainted wood can be burned

Violators of the open burning state regulation are subject to both criminal and civil enforcement actions, with a minimum fine of $500 for a first offense.

Additional information can be obtained on the NYSDEC website located at http://www.dec.ny.gov/press/80920.html. To report open burning, call the DEC at (800) 847-7332.

April is Child Abuse Prevention Month

Members of the Prince of Peace Church representing the "Cherish All Children Ministries." From left to right front, the Rev. Richard Klafehn, Fulton Mayor Ronald Woodward, Dianne Klafehn - Upstate NY Leader of Child Advocacy Center; back row  church member Alexandra Sorbello, Friend of CAC Ben Jarred, church member Margaret Nichols. Absent from photo Child Advocacy Center Executive Director Karrie Damm.
Members of the Prince of Peace Church representing the “Cherish All Children Ministries.” From left to right front, the Rev. Richard Klafehn, Fulton Mayor Ronald Woodward, Dianne Klafehn – Upstate NY Leader of Child Advocacy Center; back row church member Alexandra Sorbello, Friend of CAC Ben Jarred, church member Margaret Nichols. Absent from photo Child Advocacy Center Executive Director Karrie Damm.

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For more information on the Child Advocacy Center of Oswego County, call 592-4453.
To report a case of abuse, call the state Child Protective Services hotline at (800) 342-3720. If you feel a child is in immediate danger, call 911.

By Debra J. Groom
April is Child Abuse Prevention Month.

And Oswego County is doing more to help children be safe by reporting more cases of child abuse than ever before.
The number of children and families served by the Child Advocacy Center in Fulton increased by 48 percent from 2012-2013 – from about 320 in 2012 to 475 in 2013.

The Child Advocacy Center, the Oswego County Department of Social Services and others are stressing the importance of knowing the signs of abuse and letting authorities know when abuse occurs.

Oswego County is keenly aware of child abuse as a result of the Erin Maxwell case in 2008.

Erin was 11 years old when she was found unresponsive in her Palermo home by her stepbrother, Alan Jones. She was taken to the hospital where she was pronounced dead.

Jones was charged with her murder and her father and stepmother, Lindsey and Lynn Maxwell, were found guilty of four counts of endangering the welfare of a child. Jones’ conviction eventually was reduced to manslaughter and he is serving tie in Fishkill Correctional Facility. According to Vinelink, he is scheduled for release in June 2015.

Lindsey and Lynn Maxwell were sentenced to two years in the Oswego County jail, but were released after serving 15 months.

When investigating Erin’s death, police found that she lived in deplorable conditions, was locked in her room to eat and sometimes went to school with dirty clothing and no lunch. It came to light during the investigation that the Oswego County Department of Social Services had investigated reports about the Maxwell household and Erin, but did not remove her from the house. Many faulted the department for its inaction.

Since then, many changes were made to the way these cases are handled in Oswego County. Cornell University completed one of three studies done looking at how the social services department worked at that time. The report found Oswego County’s caseworkers were overworked, handling nearly double the national and state average of cases per caseworker.

Changes were made after the reports and more caseworkers were hired. Gregg Heffner, who was hired as commissioner of the Department of Social Services about three years after the Erin Maxwell case, said previously all of those working in the department learned from the Erin Maxwell case and have made improvements to ensure it never happens again.

One change made is the start of a Child Protection Advisory Council that meets monthly. The group, consisting of people from many different agencies throughout the county, works to increase employees’ training, make sure they are all following regulations and that workers are using the best practices possible.

Karrie Damm, executive director of the Child Advocacy Center, is on that advisory council.

“I heard a quote once that stated ‘for every one educated adult, 10 children are safer,’” she said. She believes the more people learn about child abuse, the more they understand what abuse is and how to prevent it, then the number of children being abused will decrease.

Both she and Oswego County District Attorney Gregory Oakes say the number of reported cases of child abuse coming into the Child Advocacy Center has increased so much because there is more abuse going on, but also because people are coming forward more often to report abuse cases.

Heffner recently said in a letter to the editor to The Valley News that it is important for people to report child abuse to the authorities. There is a state hotline for reporting cases, and abuse also can be called into the Child Advocacy Center or any police agency.

But people often are reluctant to report, feeling they shouldn’t stick their noses into someone else’s life or worrying the person they are reporting will come after them.

“People have to be trusting that there will be a response to their call,” Damm said. “People often feel as though ‘no one will listen to me.’”

Sometimes, the authorities aren’t listening well enough.

Oakes tells a story on how a trustworthy person he knows in the community called him about child abuse he saw in a family. Oakes said he checked out the information with others and found it to be valid and “caused me great concern as a DA and as a father.”

He called the state hotline to make a report. The state worker took Oakes’ information, but asked more questions. Oakes couldn’t answer the other questions, so the hotline worker said there was not enough information to take a report.

“I got very loud and threw my title out there,” Oakes said. “This mandated CPS (Child Protective Services) involvement. How can you turn this down?” Oakes said to the hotline worker. “This case screamed out for CPS involvement.”

Oakes then said he was going to call a press conference to let the world know the state hotline office was doing. He then was switched over to a supervisor who took the report.

Damm said if someone from the Child Advocacy Center calls the hotline with the case and is rejected, “we call back 10 minutes later to get another person to talk to or we ask for a supervisor.” She said it’s important for the public to know if they don’t get anywhere when trying to report a case of child abuse, don’t stop – try again.

“We like to blame the system. This is a community problem with a community solution,” she said.

People can report to the state hotline anonymously if they are afraid of retribution. But Damm said often it doesn’t matter if a person does or doesn’t give their names when reporting because the person doing the abuse usually knows who made a report.

“We have to be braver than the people doing the evil deeds,” she said.

Oakes, who prosecuted child abuse cases for six and a half years as an assistant district attorney in Oswego County, said many who abuse were abused themselves as children. “One of the best ways to break the cycle is to use prosecution, social services for the family and mental health services” for the child and the family.

If abuser were just prosecuted and then thrown in jail, the cycle of abuse would continue. “In many cases, abuse has gone unreported for many years across generations,” Oakes said.

That is why the nonprofit Child Advocacy Center works hand-in-hand with local law enforcement, prosecution, child protective services, medical providers, therapy providers and victim advocacy professionals in Oswego County. The center works with the parents and with the children.

“To prevent child abuse, we have to have conversations about it, keep talking about it, educate yourself and support the local program that helps kids,” Damm said. “Remember —  one educated adult keeps 10 kids safer.”