Category Archives: Hannibal News

Drawing benefits church anniversary

Pictured above is Harold Porter purchasing a ticket for a hand-made quilt donated by Barbara Gifford.  The proceeds from the sales will go toward the Hannibal United Methodist Church’s 175th Celebration/Revival being planned for 11 a.m. June 22 with an outdoor revival-type service under the tent. Period reenactors and other dignitaries will participate. Following the worship service, a light lunch will be provided followed by guest musicians and recognitions. To purchase tickets, contact any church member or call 564-5412.
Pictured above is Harold Porter purchasing a ticket for a hand-made quilt donated by Barbara Gifford. The proceeds from the sales will go toward the Hannibal United Methodist Church’s 175th Celebration/Revival being planned for 11 a.m. June 22 with an outdoor revival-type service under the tent. Period reenactors and other dignitaries will participate. Following the worship service, a light lunch will be provided followed by guest musicians and recognitions. To purchase tickets, contact any church member or call 564-5412.

Hannibal school budget vote May 20

By Debra J. Groom

Residents of the Hannibal school district will go the polls May 20 to vote on a $30,092,500 budget for the 2014-15 school year.

This proposed budget is up 4.4 percent ($1,268,300)  from the current year’s spending plan of $28,824,200.

The amount to be raised by taxes — the tax levy — is up 0.75 of a percent or $48,623. Nearly 80 percent of the total budget is state aid. Continue reading

In and Around Hannibal

By Rita Hooper 

Is this the longest “getting to spring” in history?

I’m forcing myself to put my winter coat away, but I’m wearing several sweaters when I go out. I think we are all past waiting for some warmer weather.

I see we are having a day to get rid of up to eight tires for free at the local transfer stations. The dates are May 17 and June 14 (Flag Day!) from 8 a.m. to noon.

I’m reminded of the olden days when old tires were filled with dirt and used for planters. I had a friend visiting me from college when we decided to do some tire planters for my neighbor, Stella Livingston.

Stella was one of those town characters. She never wore a coat that I can remember.  She’d stand in the Post Office if it got really cold.

Everyone knew Stella, I suspect she had cleaned house or babysat for many of Hannibal’s families at one time. Continue reading

News in Brief

The Oswego-Fulton chamber of Commerce is putting on “A Night of the Stars” from 6 to 8 p.m. May 12 in the Sheldon Ballroom at SUNY Oswego.

Tickets are $20 for chamber members and $25 for non-chamber members. They are available on the chamber website at www.oswegofultonchamber.com under the events tab.

The event is a celebration of small businesses as a kick off to Small business Week.

          *************************** Continue reading

Hannibal baseball wins first of year

By Rob Tetro

The Hannibal varsity baseball team went 1-2 in its last 3 games and now has an overall record of 1-7.

On April 25, Hannibal topped Red Creek, 5-4, to win its first game of the season. They lost to Cazenovia 4-0 in Game 1 of an April 28 doubleheader. In Game 2 of the doubleheader, Cazenovia cruised to a 14-0 win over the Warriors.

In the Red Creek win, the Warriors jumped out to a 1-0 lead in the first. The second inning was scoreless but then Red Creek pulled ahead scoring two runs in the third. Continue reading

Butterfly Walk May 24 to raise money for CS research

A butterfly walk for Hannah Crego of Hannibal is scheduled for 1 p.m. May 24 at Sterling Nature Center.

Hannah, a sixth-grader at Kenney Middle School in Hannibal, suffered from Cockayne syndrome or CS, a reare genetic disorer characterized by poor growth, premature aging, sensitivity to sunlight, moderate to profound developmental and neurological delays, and a shortened lifespan.

Hannah, who will turn 14 in August, appeared to be an average little girl until age 4. It wasn’t until the age of 8 and trips to various geneticists and specialists at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, Rochester and Boston that Hannah was diagnosed with CS type 3.

CS type 2 presents at birth while CS type 1 appears during early childhood.

Cockayne syndrome is very rare. In order for a child to be affected by CS, he or she must inherit a mutation in the same CS gene from both parents.

Hannah’s parents, Jennifer and Jason Crego of Martville, are both carriers of a single CS gene. A couple has a one in four chance of having another child with CS.

The Cregos’ son, Hannah’s brother Nathan, does not exhibit any symptoms of the syndrome.

There is no treatment nor an effective therapy available for CS, which makes research and education of the syndrome critical.

Despite the syndrome’s manifestations, the correct diagnosis is often delayed or missed all together because of the rarity of CS and the significant variability that exists between cases.

Hannah has developed milder symptoms over a period of time and does not need a wheelchair, unlike many of the other children with CS.

The Butterfly Walk for Hannah will be held to raise money for research of cockayne symdrome.

All donations are being accepted in Hannah’s name and the event will include drawings, a bake sale and water for sale.

Donations may also be made online at firstgiving.com/cockaynesyndrome/2014-butterfly-walk-new-york

Cockayne Syndrome

CS type I  is characterized by normal prenatal growth with the onset of growth and developmental abnormalities around one year of age. Typical lifespan is 10 to 20 years.

CS type II  is characterized by growth failure and other abnormalities at birth, with little or no postnatal neurologic development. Typical lifespan is up to 7 years.

CS type III is characterized by a later onset, lesser symptoms, and/or a slower rate of progression.. Expected lifespan is unclear, but can be 40 or 50  years.

Source: cockaynesyndrome.net

County legislature considers closing 4 transfer stations

By Debra J. Groom

A report will be issued by the end of May on how Oswego County can close four of its transfer stations by the end of 2015.

Department of Solid Waste Director Frank Visser said he, County Executive Philip Church and County Attorney Richard Mitchell have been directed by the county Legislature to come up with a plan to permanently close the transfer stations in Hannibal, Hastings, Oswego and Pulaski. Only Bristol Hill in Volney would remain open.

The report will be presented to the county Legislature’s Infrastructure, Facilities and Technology Committee. Continue reading