Category Archives: Fulton News

Fulton YMCA Speed Demons take on Norwich and Oneonta

The Fulton YMCA Speed Demons recently competed against Norwich and Oneonta.

Speed Demon swimmers continue to work hard in the pool and had many first-place finishes against Norwich.

Grace Trepasso and Mallory Curtis were two of five Fulton swimmers competing in the 20-lap 500 Free event, both taking time off their previous marks and finishing first in their class.

Alisa Trudell had the biggest drop in the meet, crushing her best time in the 200 Free by 32 seconds and also improving in her 100 Free and 100 Back.

Ella Henderson grabbed first in the 200 Free and 50 Fly while Dawson Curtis brought home top honors in the 50 Breast.

Teammates achieving personal best swim times against Norwich were:

Kendall Williamson (50 Free)

Cameron Warren (100 Free, 50 Back)

David Tallents (50 Free, 100 Free)

Hayden Williamson (200 IM, 50 Back, 50 Breast)

Against Oneonta, Fulton showed strength in the Individual Medley (IM) at all levels.

Some first-place honors were won by Lane Rawls, Alisa Trudell, Airyona Croci and Christina Tallents.

Kaitlyn Trudell took an impressive 10 seconds off her 200 IM time. Dakota Stoutenger improved his 200 Free, finishing first.

Luvlee Croci showed the 50 Fly is her strength, finishing first. In the 20-lap 500 Free, Sage Hourihan displayed endurance, finishing under the 7-minute mark by shaving off an astounding 35 seconds.

Brooke Halstead swam personal best times in her 100 Free and 100 Back as did Emily Grant in her three events (100 IM, 100 Free, 50 Breast).

Bodley Bulletins, by Julia Ludington

I hope everyone is enjoying their week off from school.

The Student Senate, FBLA, French Club and Hope Club have all decided to extend the deadline for canned goods collection to Feb. 28.

If you have not already brought in any non-perishable items, or if you would like to bring in more, please plan to when we get back to school. It is for a great cause.

Some teachers are offering incentives for bringing in cans, so make sure to participate. Don’t forget that the Guided Study Hall that collects the most will win a breakfast.

Our FBLA team had a very successful competition recently. The club brought home 12 awards in total. Two first-place awards were won by two of our exchange students, and two other Bodley students also brought home first-place awards.

Our FBLA club always does very well, and we are very proud. Some students even make it to state and national-level competitions. Best of luck for the rest of the year to our fellow GRB students!

On Valentine’s Day, students enjoyed a bit of fun sponsored by the German Club. Students could purchase notes for that special someone or friends and have them delivered to their guided study halls on Friday. The event created a nice atmosphere for the holiday even at the high school.

Students who have signed up for the GRB mentor program should report to their second session Feb. 25.

See you all back at school next week!

Zoo to You brings hands-on experiences to Lanigan Elementary

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

Zoo to You visited Lanigan Elementary School in Fulton recently to present an educational program and deliver adoption certificates.

Each fourth-grade class adopted an animal from the Rosamond Gifford Zoo. The money was raised from a math-fact-a-thon held earlier in the year during which students studied multiplication facts and collected pledges.

The animals adopted by Lanigan students included a Red Panda, Reticulated Python, Bald Eagle and Snow Leopard.

There are two bald eagles and four snow leopards at the Syracuse zoo.

As a token of the zoos appreciation, each of the four classes received a gift bag filled with fact sheets, adoption certificates, colored photos and a stuffed animal.

Students will take turns bringing the plush animal home with them. Their adventures will be recorded in a traveling journal.

Zoo to You’s goal is to increase awareness of the animal kingdom and encourage students to be environmentally conscious. Each program includes live animals such as birds, reptiles and invertebrates.

Professional Zoo Educator Ashley brought along a Ball Python, Chilean rose hair tarantula and a screech owl.

Students were able to pet Namari the python, and feel how its skin is smooth, not slimy. Namari eats a meal of two dead mice once weekly. He smells with his forked tongue and swallows its prey by unhooking its jaw.

Gerty the tarantula was kept safe in a plastic enclosure. Her job is to eat bugs, and the zoo mimics the diet she would have in the wild.

The Eastern screech owl Pigwidgeon was born in Cato, and was tragically involved in a car accident. Pigwidgeon was blinded in one eye, and experienced some brain damage. For this reason, Pigwidgeon is kept safe behind the scenes at the zoo, and makes frequent classroom visits.

Students learned screech owls live in Central New York. They can be found wherever trees are, and camouflage themselves during the day. The bird of prey is nocturnal, and catches food with its feet.

The fourth-graders also were given a quick math lesson that just so happened to fit into their unit on fractions.

Pigwidegeon can turn his head 270 degrees, or three-fourths around. Humans can only rotate their heads 180 degrees.

 

Anthony Miller, enjoyed music and spending time with family, friends

Anthony Miller, 46, of Phoenix, NY, died tragically Monday, Feb. 3 at his Phoenix home.

Mr. Miller was born in Syracuse, NY and he previously lived in Tennessee before returning to Phoenix, NY.

He enjoyed listening to music and spending time with his amazing friends and loving family.

Mr. Miller is survived by his four siblings, Fred Miller, Jr., Ed Miller, Thomas Miller and Lulia Brown; two step-siblings Marion Brosteck and Gerald Kimball;  and several nieces and nephews.

Funeral services were held Tuesday Feb. 18 at the Sugar Funeral Home, Inc., with the Rev. Peter Williams officiating.

Burial will be held privately. Calling hours also were Tuesday in the Sugar Funeral Home, Inc., 224 W. Second St. S. Fulton.

George H. Woods, carpenter, Vietnam veteran

George H. Woods, 67, of Fulton, died Wednesday Feb. 12 in Oswego Hospital, Oswego.

Mr. Woods was a lifetime resident of Fulton. He was a United States veteran having served during the Vietnam War in the Air Force.

Mr. Woods retired from the Oswego Carpenter’s Union Local #747 after several years of service.  He was a past member of the Pathfinder Rod and Gun Club and the Hannibal American Legion Post #1552.

Mr. Woods was pre-deceased by his first wife Anne C. Woods in 1981, and second wife Sylvia Woods in 1993.

He is survived by his longtime companion of more than 20 years Virginia Richardson-Faehl; step-son Gary Nichols; sister Kay (Jack) Farley of AZ; granddaughter Brandi (Len) Keener; and 2 great grandchildren Peyton, Collin Keener and several nieces and nephews.

Funeral service was Saturday in the Sugar Funeral Home, Inc., 224 W. Second St. S. Fulton, with the Rev. Moritz Fuchs.

Burial was held privately Monday in St. Peter’s Cemetery, Oswego. Calling hours were Saturday at the Sugar Funeral Home, Inc.

Big changes in store for Oswego County BOCES CTE program

By Ashley M. Casey

With a $35 million renovation of the Oswego County BOCES complex on the agenda for this summer and some new programs on the way, the Career and Technical Education branch of BOCES is undergoing some big changes for the 2014-15 school year.

CTE Principal Marla Berlin, who took the helm in September 2013, presented an update on the programs’ progress at the Feb. 11 Fulton Board of Education meeting. This academic year, 123 of the county’s 704 CTE students come from the Fulton district.

Berlin, who previously taught business at Mexico High School, said CTE is introducing a STEM academy, two business education programs and “Career Connections,” an effort aimed at disengaged 10th graders.

Career Connections is a half-day exploratory career program that lets 10th graders who are in danger of dropping out of high school experience the various programs CTE has to offer. Berlin said the program’s goal is to “try to hook them into learning” and “bring back that joy of learning.” Although enrollment numbers are not yet final, Berlin said she expects up to 40 students to participate.

Next year, CTE will also eliminate the Floral Design and Greenhouse Technology programs.

“It really was not self-sustaining and not supported by local labor markets,” Berlin told the Fulton school board.

Berlin told The Valley News that current 11th-graders in those programs can continue in different CTE programs next year. She said one student who is interested in opening a floral shop one day may take the new business program, and another botany-minded student may continue in the new STEM academy.

The STEM academy will use scientific inquiry to solve real world problems. Berlin said BOCES has acquired 3-D printers for use in the digital media, STEM and motor sports fabrication programs. Students are using the 3-D printers to design and create objects. She said one of BOCES’ non-3-D printers has a broken component that is no longer made by the printer’s manufacturer.

“Our students are working with CAD and 3-D printers to design … and replicate that part,” Berlin said.

She said BOCES is also looking into buying a 3-D printer that uses chocolate and hard candy for the culinary arts students to create their own confections.

“The kids here think out of the box,” Berlin said. She recalled one student who suggested that BOCES build a mini-fire station for CTE public safety students to practice. “It says a lot about the innovative and creative thinking that kids are inspired to do while they’re here.”

CTE’s programs align with New York state’s new Common Core Learning Standards, which have an emphasis on hands-on, project-based learning and real-world application.

“That’s how they learn, that’s what excites them, and that’s what keeps them in school so they graduate,” Berlin said.

Students in CTE programs are held to industry standards and participate in internships with local companies.

“The success of our internship placement really depends on community support,” Berlin said. “We have excellent rapport (and we’re) making sure our students are knowledgeable, prepared and appropriate for those placements.”

CTE works with Oswego County and the state Department of Labor to keep a finger on the pulse of the county’s job market and place students in fields in which they can find jobs upon graduation.

“It’s not just about placing students just to place them somewhere,” Berlin said. “We truly want to help them move forward in their career path.”

Recently, Oswego’s CTE students won 32 awards in the regional SkillsUSA competition at Morrisville State College. Oswego took the top three spots in collision repair. Many students will go on to the state conference in April at the New York State Fairgrounds in Syracuse.

Despite the whirlwind five months of hard work her new position has brought, Berlin said it has been rewarding.

“It’s all about the kids, watching them learn and their experiences the instructors give them,” she said. “Whenever I get bogged down with paperwork, I walk through the programs. That just makes me smile. They’re looking at their future.”

Legislature OKs appeals lawyer; accepts snowmobile trail maintenance money

By Debra J. Groom

The Oswego County Legislature on Thursday approved hiring an outside lawyer to handle appeals.

District Attorney Gregory Oakes pitched this idea to the legislature during the December 2014 budget hearing. He said an assistant district attorney is his office was spending half of her work time on appeals instead of prosecuting county cases.

County officials have been trying to move cases through the court system quicker in hopes of alleviating overcrowding at the Oswego County jail.

Often, defendants in felony cases are held in jail waiting for their court dates when they can’t make bail, so Oakes and others came up with way to move people through the court system quicker.

The legislature hired Amy L. Hallenbeck, of Johnstown, at $2,600 per appeal. Oakes said during the past 10 years, the office has averaged 10 appeals a year.

Also Thursday, the legislature:

** Passed a resolution in support of allowing crossbow hunting in Oswego County.

** Approved spending $80,000 to replace turbine steam condenser tubes at the Energy Recovery Facility. The facility operates two steam turbine generators to produce electricity and the steam exiting the turbine is cooled by steam condenser that use river water as a cooling medium. The system has been in use for nearly 30 years and the tubes are wearing thin from normal wear and tear.

** Approved naming Dr. Michael S. Nupuf of Oswego to the Oswego County Board of Health. Nupuf is in private practice in internal medicine.

** Approved the transfer of $38,000 for the recruitment and retention of nurses for the Oswego County Health Department’s Certified Home Health Agency and Long Term Home Health Care Program.

** Appointed John FitzGibbons to another term on the Oswego County Board of Ethics. His term will run through Feb. 1, 2017.

** Authorized Chairman Kevin Gardner to enter into agreements in relation to the Snowmobile Trail Development and Maintenance Program and accept $218,365 for use in the 2012-14 snowmobile trail season. The money will be split between 10 county snowmobile clubs who maintain the hundreds of miles of trails in the county.

** Awarded a contract to Miller Consulting Services and Miller Engineers, of Manlius, for $35,020 for consulting work needed prior to the demolition of the old jail on Route 481 across from the current Oswego County Correctional Facility.

** Approved urging New York state to extend or make permanent Real Property Tax Law Section 485, which would allow municipalities to negotiate tax agreements with the owners of nuclear power plants.

** Approved urging New York state to review and amend the taxable status of spent nuclear fuel storage facilities.

February is Black History Month

It is Black History Month, so The Valley News thought it would be good to share some stories of African-American history right here in Oswego County.

Here are a few vignettes:

‘Harlem Hellfighters’ at Fort Ontario.

The Harlem Hellfighters were an all-black military infantry unit during World War I, a group that received high recognition for its heroism and fighting ability.

By the time World War II rolled around, the group from Harlem in New York City now was called the 369th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Regiment. And before shipping out to take on the Japanese in the Pacific, these 1,800 black soldiers did their training at Fort Ontario.

Sure, fighting the Germans would be rough. But the soldiers also got a taste of rough when they arrived in Oswego for training in January 1941. One soldier said he remembers getting off the train in Oswego and they immediately lost a soldier in a mound of snow.

Even though the United States was not yet in the war, training of troops was taking place as President Franklin D. Roosevelt prepared for the worse. The men with the 369th spent eight months at Fort Ontario, practicing anti-artillery drills at the Johnson Farm, an abandoned area east of the fort, where nine Mile Point One is now located.

A history student at SUNY Oswego wrote in 1972 that the men of the 369th often went into Oswego or Syracuse when they were off duty. They would hang out at the Dunbar Social Center in Syracuse and play basketball. They would shop in Oswego and eat at local restaurants.

Adding nearly 1,800 black soldiers to the population changed the demographic makeup of Oswego. In a county of more than 71,000 residents, 55 were black before the soldiers arrived, according to the U.S. Census in 1940. By contrast, Harlem — where most of the men were from — had an 89 percent black population, the 1940 Census shows.

“Outside of Harlem, the issue of race became more immediate for the 369th,” a 1993 article in the Journal of Social History says. “Oswego was, in the words of one member of the 369th, ‘lily white.’

The most famous of the 369th soldiers at Fort Ontario was Lt. John Woodruff, also known as “Long John” Woodruff. He had won the gold medal in the 800 meters at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin.

The 369th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Regiment was at Fort Ontario from Jan. 15 through September, when they shipped out to Massachusetts and then to Hawaii.

During World War II, they engaged in defensive and tactical operations on new Georgia Island, Emirau, Los Negros Island, Admiralty Island, Biak Island, Sansapor New Guinea, Middleburg Island and Morotai Island, all in the Papua New Guinea area of southeast Asia.

Starr Clark Tin Shop

Starr Clark had a business in Mexico in the 1850s – a tin shop making stove pipes and other pieces of tin wear.

But in addition to the tin work, Clark and his family also used their house to shelter runaway slaves as they made their way north to freedom in Canada.

The tin shop building, on Main Street (Route 104), still exists and has since been renovated into a museum to mark Mexico’s importance along the Underground Railroad.

Judith Wellman, a professor emerita at the State University College at Oswego and expert on U.S. African-American history, researched the building’s role in the Underground Railroad. Her work produced enough evidence to have the tin shop named to the National Register of Historic Places in 2001. She said it is one of the best documented Underground Railroad sites.

Oswego Public Library

Gerrit Smith, the famous abolitionist who lived in Peterboro, Madison County, provided the money for construction of  the Oswego Public Library.

But he had two conditions to providing the money. One was that the library must be on the east side of the Oswego River. And the second is that the library should be open to everyone, regardless of his or her race or complexion.

According to the library’s history on its website, the library has had “African-American patrons including prominent members of the Underground Railroad and the local community.” Records kept on who was borrowing books from the library show that many African-American families used the library during its first years, the history states.

Grant – dentist, patented golf tee 

The Tudor E. Grant family was a well-known African-American family in Oswego. Tudor Grant’s son, George Franklin, who was born in Oswego, made a name for himself in later life, becoming the second African American to graduate from Harvard’s dental college. He later became a faculty member of his alma mater and was a leader in the treatment of cleft palates.

But he also is renowned in the sports world. He received the first patent for the wooden golf tee.

Bristol Hill Church, Volney

This church on Route 3 had many white and African-American members dating to the early and mid-1800s. The church was built in the 1830s and is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Case House in Fulton

The Case House on South First Street in Fulton was well known for the Underground Railroad activity that took place there. It is at the site where the old Elks Lodge was located.

Interracial Couple in Fulton

In a book titled “the American Prejudice Against Color,” William Allen, a college professor who says he was one-quarter African American, tells the story of how he fell in love with a white girl in Fulton, became engaged to marry her and the prejudice they encountered due to their engagement.

In fact, an angry mob of Fulton-area residents who did not want this marriage to take place went after Allen.

“Tar, feathers, poles, and an empty barrel spiked with shingle nails had been prepared for my especial benefit; and, so far as I was concerned, it must be escape or death,” Allen wrote in his book.

He wrote that a mob of 400 to 500 people came looking for him after they learned of his engagement to Miss King. He wrote “Reader, the life of a colored man in America, save as a slave, is regarded as far less sacred than that of a dog. There is no exaggeration in this statement—I am not writing of exceptions.”

Allen and King were eventually married in New York City and then left for Europe.

There are many other stories about African Americans in Oswego County at http://visitoswegocounty.com/historical-info/underground-railroad/ . The county had its own Anti-Slavery Society and was known as a hotbed of abolitionist action.