Category Archives: Fulton News

Ritchie commends local artists

In an effort to recognize local artistic talent in Central and Northern New York, state Sen. Patty Ritchie, along with the North Country Arts Council, hosted a celebration of the arts Thursday evening in Watertown.

At the event, those who have participated in the “Senator Ritchie Celebrates Local Artists” program were recognized.

Through the effort, two dozen artists have had their work featured in Ritchie’s Albany, Ogdensburg, Oswego and Watertown offices.

The work of past featured artists can be viewed at Downtown Watertown’s Franklin Building or at www.ritchie.nysenate.gov.

In addition, at the event, high school students from the Central and Northern New York region were inducted into Ritchie’s local artists program, and in the weeks to come, will have their artwork featured in her offices.

Several high school students were also invited to perform in the areas of song and dance.

“Our region is home to so much great local talent, and this event was a way to not only highlight that, but also to thank the artists who share their amazing work with us. This event was truly special, because we recognized our region’s ‘next generation’ of artists, by honoring high school students who have exceptional artistic abilities and inviting several of those students to perform,” Ritchie said.

“I’d like thank the North Country Arts Council for helping to make this event possible.  The organization is a wonderful resource not only for artists, but also for the community experience the various types of culture our area has to offer,” she said.

Honorees from Oswego County:

  • Gale Armstrong
  • Phyllis DiSalvo
  • Sandra Dowie
  • Edward Elsner
  • James Fitzgerald
  • Joe Galvin
  • Ellen Landphere
  • Phillip Lee
  • Bonnie McClellan
  • Loie Mechetti
  • Joanne Neff
  • Marcella Slater
  • Kathryn Wehrung

Oswego County students honored:

  • Ashlee Bishop:  APW High School
  • Nicole Light:  Paul V. Moore High School, Central Square
  • Cassondra Orr: G. Ray Bodley High School, Fulton
  • Sydney Ryan: Mexico High School
  • Kayla Volkomer: Oswego High School
  • Megan Lentz: John C. Birdlebough High School, Phoenix
  • Isabel Englbrekt: Pulaski Junior-Senior High School
  • Sarah McDougal: Sandy Creek High School

 

BOCES students practice their skills

Clients pampered at BOCES

Oswego Industries clients recently were treated to hand and nail treatments at the cosmetology class at Oswego County BOCES.

Clients were given manicures and paraffin hand dip treatments.

The program provides the 85 students the chance to practice what they have learned.

The students learn about chemistry, electricity, anatomy and physiology and business planning sanitation sterilization, professional image.

Cookin’ up a storm

Students in the culinary arts program at Oswego County BOCES served up a special breakfast buffet to the Oswego County Counselors group following their meeting at the BOCES campus. 

The culinary students put their skills to the test when they provided a buffet featuring bagels, English muffins, French toast, sausage, bacon, eggs, fruit, pastries, and an omelet station where made to order omelets were prepared.

The students also practiced their customer service skills as they provided table service to the district representatives on hand.

The counselors were guidance counselors from the nine component school districts in the county.

For more information about the culinary arts program at Oswego County BOCES, contact Marla Berlin, Career and Technical Education Principal at 963-4433.

Fairgrieve students receive honors

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

Outstanding students from each class, kindergarten through grade six, were selected to receive the Fairgrieve Elementary School Principal’s Award.

Principal Jean Ciesla presents the awards quarterly to recognize role model students for regularly upholding the school’s following four behavioral expectations: be respectful, be responsible, be safe, and be a problem solver; which are part of the district-wide PBIS (Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports) initiative.

Fairgrieve Elementary School’s Principal’s Award winners for second quarter of the 2013-14 school year are:

Kindergartners Penelope Taylor, Jared Gardenier and Kiernan Percival

First-graders Bailey DePoint, Mya Carroll and Logan Patchen;

Second-graders Carleigh Patterson, Skyy Smith, McKenna Lawson and Brandi Weindl.

Third-graders William Patterson, Cassidy Duso and Mandy Allen

Fourth-graders Alexandra Coakley, Molly Williams and Charles Stoutenger

Fifth-graders Toni Gates, Lauren Goss and Jaidyn Perry

Sixth-graders Samantha Perkins, Kyle Hotaling and Devanee Sabin.

Volney students hope to read 2,500 books; send principal up to the roof

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

Volney Elementary School students attended a spirit assembly Feb. 28 in recognition of their positive behavior and for being role models.

Principal Lisa Garofalo gave certificates to one student from each classroom who exemplified the character trait of honesty.

In addition to the classroom role models, 22 students were awarded certificates for being “On A Roll” models.

The monthly classroom role models were Aiden Grant, Ethan Clark, Kyle Stuber, James DeCare, Tyler Budd, Abbigail Gist, Keira Scott, Caitlin Roberts and Ashley Huller.

Also: Caiden Taber, Marissa Bowering, Lydia Gigliotti, Alexis Ingersoll, Grace Esposito, Emma Brewster, Nick Miceli, Nick Smith, Cassandra Seaton, Chloe Hurlbut and Jessica Hyman.

Students earning recognition as the monthly “On a Roll” models included Adriana Raymond, Caleb Turner, Gavynn Krick, Valerie Nichols, Brayden Moshier, Caleb Clark, Parker Ellis, Hailey Ward, Amber Dumas and Cory Hyman.

Also: Tylyn Boshart, Brad Currier, Shane Gouterngout- Reynolds. Tesa Galvin, Mason Firenze, Lilly Dumas, Sarah Gigliotti, Emily Grant, Rain Frank, Sabastion Lauckarn, Tyler Emeterio and Jayce Gibides.

After the awards presentation, Garofalo read aloud Miss Malarkey Leaves No Reader Behind by Judy Finchler and Kevin O’Malley.

In the book, character Principal Wiggins promises to dye his hair purple and sleep on the school roof if the students read 1,000 books in a school year.

With March 3 being the 17th annual Read Across America Day, Garofalo decided to put out a challenge to her school: read 2,500 books in one week.

If students meet the challenge, Garofalo, like the principal in the story, agreed to spend the night on the roof and dye her hair purple.

Students could hardly contain their enthusiasm, and went home for the weekend fired up to read.

Program helps people with chronic health problems

Oswego Health is offering free workshops for community members who want to better manage their chronic conditions.

The free, six-week program developed by Stanford University will be held Fridays from 9:30 a.m. to noon beginning March 14 at Springside at Seneca Hill.

A similar program was held recently in Oswego and participants remarked the provided materials offered successful strategies to improve their health status.

“This program provides participants with the knowledge and skills that truly empower them to make lifestyle changes to improve their chronic disease management,” said registered nurse Rachel Baglia

Baglia, along with registered nurse Sue Callaway, will lead the program

This program is designed to help those with arthritis, heart disease, osteoporosis or diabetes improve their health status through its living healthy workshops.

The workshops will cover nutrition and exercise, as well as how to get support, deal with pain and fatigue and talk with your physician and family members about your condition. Participants will learn goal setting techniques and establish a step-by-step plan to improve their health.

Those taking part in the program will be provided a free workbook and healthy snacks at each class session.

To register, or if you have questions, call 349-5513.

News in Brief

Trinity United Methodist Church in Oswego will be serving an All You Can Eat Pancake Breakfast from 8 to 11 a.m. Saturday March 8.

The menu includes your choice of French toast, waffles or pancakes, sausage, juice, coffee or tea.

Extra sides may be purchased as well.

Trinity United Methodist Church is located at 45 E. Utica Street (corner of East Fourth at Utica Street) in Oswego.

For more information, call the church at 343-1715.

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The Montezuma Audubon Center is proud to welcome WOWEE Wildlife and their live animals from 3 to 4 p.m., Saturday, March 8.

During this family friendly indoor program, participants will meet some native animals up close! A bobcat, fox and other wild creatures will be on display during an informative and captivating presentation.

Bring your cameras and be ready to enjoy WOWEE Wildlife. A fee will be charged. Space is limited and registration is required by calling 365-3588 or e-mail montezuma@audubon.org to register.

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The Sons of the American Legion Post 1552 in Hannibal will have its monthly buffet breakfast from 8 to 11 a.m., Sunday, March 9 at the post on Rochester Street.

A full menu will be offered.

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The Evangel University Concert Choir will appear in concert at Port City Faith,      Oswego, at 10:45 a.m., March 9, the Rev. Sebastian Foti has announced.

The EU Concert Choir is a 36-member vocal ensemble that is currently touring through Ohio, Virginia, New York and Connecticut.

During the past 30 years, the choir has toured in the 48 contiguous states, Canada, the Bahamas, Cuba and 15 countries in Europe.

The repertoire of the Concert Choir ranges from classical to contemporary sacred literature. The program is as varied and energetic as the 36-member choral ensemble. CDs will be available for sale after the concert.

Evangel University is a member of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools and is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission, the National Association of Schools of Music and the Council on Social Work Education.

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There will be a chili, soup and salad luncheon from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday March 13 at the Oswego Center United Methodist Church.

The church is on County Route 7 in Oswego.

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Halters, saddles, clothes and much more will be for sale at bargain prices at the annual Oswego County 4-H Tack Sale from 10 a.m. to noon March 15 at Central Square Middle School, Route 11.

The benefits of the sale support the 4-H educational horse programs held throughout Oswego County.

Anyone who loves a bargain and is looking for equine related items, this sale is for you.

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Registration for Canal Clean Sweep events ends in two weeks.

If you haven’t done so already, please register your event by March 15.

The state Canal Corp. and Parks and Trails New York once again need your help for the annual Canal Clean Sweep.

Last year’s Clean Sweep resulted in more than 150 communities, civic groups, businesses and social clubs completing nearly 100 cleanup and beautification events along the Canal System and the Canalway Trail.

This year’s event will take place Friday-Sunday, April 25-27.

Like last year, the 2014 Canal Clean Sweep will be held in recognition of Earth Day 2014, and in advance of the upcoming navigation season, the 190th consecutive season on the New York State Canal System.

Fulton man charged with making meth

A 37-year-old Fulton man was arrested by Oswego police March 4 for a felony count of manufacturing methamphetamine in the third degree.

Ronald E. Recore, of 107 Highland St., Fulton, also was charged with a misdemeanor county of petit larceny for allegedly stealing a Rite Aid brand instant cold compress from the MidTown Plaza earlier in the day.

Oswego police said instant cold compresses contain ammonium nitrate, an ingredient used in the “one pot” method of making methamphetamine.

Recore was arrested after a car he was in was stopped by Oswego Police on East Ninth Street. As a safety precaution, East Ninth Street between East Bridge Street and East Cayuga Street was closed off to all traffic while Oswego City Fire Department stood by on scene.

Recore was being held in jail pending his arraignment. The investigation is continuing and further arrests are likely.

As always, Oswego City Police are asking anyone with information regarding this or any other illegal drug activity to contact them at 342-2283. Individuals wishing to remain anonymous may also contact the Oswego City Police Departments tip-line at 342-8131, or email crimewatch@oswegony.org

Women’s History Month: Fascinating women in Fulton’s past

By Ashley M. Casey

Those looking to celebrate Women’s History Month need look no further than our own backyard.

With the help of Sue Lane from the Friends of History, The Valley News has uncovered some fascinating ladies who have called Fulton home.

 

Edna Skinner

Best known as Kay Addison on the classic TV show “Mister Ed,” actress Edna Skinner was born in Washington, D.C., May 23, 1921. Her family moved to Fulton, where her father Eugene was the president of Sealright Co.

As a child, Edna suffered from chronic asthma and was not expected to live to adulthood. Her health bounced back under the care of a Lake Placid doctor, and she went on to study acting at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York City.

Edna starred as as Ado Annie in the original Broadway production “Oklahoma!” and signed a contract with MGM in 1946.

She also helped sell more than $5 million worth of war bonds to help fund the United States military in World War II.

In 1964, Edna retired from acting and became a world-renowned expert on fly fishing. She wrote more than 280 articles on the subject.

According to variety.com, Skinner “was employed by two fishing equipment manufacturers, for whom she and her companion of more than 40 years, photographer Jean Fish, traveled more than 485,000 miles on fishing trips and to various sports shows.”

Edna Skinner died of heart failure on Aug. 8, 2003, in North Bend, Ore.

 

Betty Ford

Before she became First Lady, Betty Bloomer married William Warren in 1942. The couple moved to Fulton, where William worked for Sealright as a salesman.

The Warrens lived at 409 E. Broadway for nearly a year. Their Fulton neighbors remembered them as “an attractive couple, fun-loving, and an asset to the community,” according to a 1976 newspaper clipping from the Friends of History.

Betty worked on a production line at Birdseye during her time in Fulton.

After five years of marriage, Betty and William divorced. In 1948, Betty married Gerald R. Ford, who became President of the United States upon the resignation of Richard Nixon in 1974.

Betty famously struggled with addiction to alcohol and painkillers, which led her to found the Betty Ford Center to treat recovering addicts.

She died at age 93 of natural causes July 8, 2011, in Rancho Mirage, Calif.

 

Marion Dickerman and Nancy Cook

Fellow Syracuse University graduates and early 20th-century feminists Marion Dickerman and Nancy Cook rekindled their college friendship when they both taught at Fulton High School in the early 1900s.

The two women lived together for most of their adult lives and championed women’s causes, including the right to vote and fair labor legislation. They volunteered overseas during World War I, tending to wounded soldiers.

According to the March 24, 1919, edition of The Fulton Patriot, Dickerman spoke in front of the New York State League of Women Voters at a conference in Syracuse.

She was later chosen by the Democratic Party as the first female candidate for the New York State Legislature. She lost to Thaddeus Sweet of Phoenix, N.Y.

Cook was Dickerman’s campaign manager and served as executive secretary of the Women’s Division of the State Democratic Committee for 19 years.

Cook and Dickerman befriended Eleanor Roosevelt through their political activities and helped build the Stone Cottage at Val-Kill, which was part of Roosevelt’s Hyde Park, N.Y., estate.

The three women had a falling out in the late 1930s, but Dickerman and Cook continued to live at Val-Kill until the 1945 death of Eleanor’s husband, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

Cook and Dickerman moved to New Canaan, Conn., where Dickerman was the educational programming director for the Marine Museum.

Cook passed away Aug. 16, 1962, and Dickerman died in Kennett Square, Pa., on May 16, 1983.