Category Archives: Fulton News

Bodley senior is student artist of the month

The CNY Arts Center Arts in the HeART Gallery is opening its doors to local high school students to be able to display their art work for one full month.

Gallery coordinator Bonnie McClellan has teamed with local high school students to bring these exhibits to the public.

Hannah Jones, a senior at G. Ray Bodley High School, currently has her work on exhibit at the gallery.

When Hannah was about five years old, she knew she loved art. Like most young children, she was interested in painting, drawing and coloring. She loved to paint pictures on rocks she picked up from the shore of Lake Ontario, but her favorite thing to do was color.

She enjoyed drawing and coloring sunsets because they were so fascinating to her. Luckily being artsy has always stuck with her and to this day art is her favorite hobby.

Taking all the art classes G. Ray Bodley offers has made her realize she wants to continue taking art classes throughout college. Her plan is to major in art and minor in psychology in order to pursue a career in art therapy.

Hannah plans to attend Onondaga Community College in the fall.

A career in art therapy is an amazing way to reach out to people and teach them alternative ways of coping with problems, managing stress, fostering self-awareness, and developing social skills.

Many people in a community benefit from art therapy because it is an effective treatment for people experiencing developmental, medical, educational, social or psychological impairment.

Individuals who benefit from art therapy include those who have survived trauma resulting from combat, abuse and natural disaster.  Art therapy helps people resolve conflicts, improve interpersonal skills, manage problematic behaviors, reduce negative stress, and achieve personal insight.

It also provides an opportunity to enjoy the pleasures of making art.

Hannah said she is honored to be the student artist of the month. CNY Arts Center is equally happy to exhibit Hannah’s work. Thank you for sharing your art work with us and the community.

Stop in to see her work at Arts in the heART Gallery, 47 S. First St., Fulton.

Students meet reading challenge; giggle at principal’s purple hair

Volney Principal Lisa Garofalo with her purple hair and pajamas takes to the school roof after her students met her reading challenge.
Volney Principal Lisa Garofalo with her purple hair and pajamas takes to the school roof after her students met her reading challenge.

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

Volney Elementary Principal Lisa Garofalo set a challenge for students at the last school spirit day assembly, read 2,500 books during Read Across America Week and she would sleep on the school roof and dye her hair purple.

The idea came from the book “Miss Malarkey Leaves No Reader Behind,” by Judy Finchler and Kevin O’Malley.

In the book, character Principal Wiggins promises to dye his hair purple and spend the night on the school roof if the students read 1,000 books in a school year.

Students recorded their book tally through reading logs, which were then submitted to librarian Sarah Fay. At the close of the week, students had read a total of 3,467 books.

As promised, Garofalo (outfitted in pajamas) got on the school’s snowy roof, her purple hair tucked under a winter cap, and waved goodbye to students at dismissal.

Fairgrieve students read for thousands of minutes

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

A novel idea at Fairgrieve Elementary School in Fulton has translated into reading success within the building, and students recently were rewarded for their efforts.

At the beginning of the school year, Principal Jean Ciesla launched a reading challenge to all the students at Fairgrieve. Each student received a calendar to take home and log their time spent reading.

Once the minutes are recorded, parents or guardians have to sign off on it and then students submit the completed calendar to their teacher.

“We encouraged the students to read at least 15 minutes a day,” Ciesla said. “Our goal was to have the boys and girls read 2,000 minutes by the halfway point, and 4,000 minutes by the end of the year.”

For dozens of students, the 2,000-minute goal was an attainable one, and they earned special recognition during an ice cream social in late February.

“Congratulations everyone for making it to the 2,000-minute mark,” Ciesla said. “You should be very proud of what you accomplished. “

The principal encouraged students to continue reading each night and reminded them another celebration would be held in June if they are able to keep on pace and log another 2,000 minutes.

Volney Elementary students get lesson in Indian art

Dr. Rani Jha, master painter and teacher at the Mithila Art Institute in Madhubani, stopped at Volney Elementary in late February to give students a lesson in art and culture.

Dr. Jha visited a few schools during her visit to the United States, and agreed to teach the mithila art form to small groups of students. The top art students from grades four through sixth participated in the lesson.

Librarian Sarah Fay first introduced the mithila art form to the 30 selected students in a brief library presentation.

Mithila painting is a centuries old traditional women’s art form of north India, in the area just below the border with Nepal.

Dr. Jha started painting in her home at seven years old. Conventionally done on newly plastered mud wall of huts, mithila paintings can now be found on hand-made paper, cloth and canvas.

The wall paintings feature symbols of luck and religion, each illustrating an artist’s individual flair.

Dr. Jha drew for the students a peacock, the national bird of India. In their 40-minute session students drew fish, turtles (a symbol of patience and long life) and peacocks in the mithila style.

Students asked Dr. Jha questions about her religion, Hinduism, and about the sari.

Palermo begins dog count April 1

The town of Palermo Dog Control is conducting a Dog Enumeration (dog count) beginning April 1.

All dog four months and older are required by state law and town law to be licensed in the township.

Any owners who have dog(s) that are not licensed will be issued a ticket.

The fines for unlicensed dogs are as follows: $25 for the first, $50 for the second and $100 for the third and subsequent offenses.

The cost of a licenses are: $6 for spayed or neutered; and $13 for unspayed and unneutered.

New York state allows the town to collect a $5 fee during an enumeration at the time of licensing, which will be collected starting April 1.

A current rabies certificate is required in order to obtain a license.

The first Rabies Clinic will be held in Scriba at the County Highway Garage from 6 to 8 p.m. March 26.

Anyone with questions on licensing should call the Palermo Town Clerk at 593-2333 ext. 227 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

To obtain a license, bring or send a current rabies certificate with cash or check to Town Clerk, 53 County Route 35, Fulton, NY 13069.

The clerk’s office hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

Sign up now for farm workshop

A workshop titled “So you’ve bought a farm… now what?” is being offered by Cooperative Extension of Oswego County.

The focus is to educate new landowners and farmers interested in transitioning or adding to their current business. This program is designed to help these farmers make use of their land resources in a manner that fits their personal and business goals.

Those attending will hear topics such as understanding the  purchase of farm machinery, estimating farm machinery costs, alternatives for acquiring farm machinery, raising liverstock,  the production of fruit and vegetables and greenhouse operations.

The workshop will run March 27, April 10 and April 24 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Mexico Library. Cost of the workshop will be $15 per person per session.  Anyone interested must pre-register no later than the morning of March 27. For more information, call 963-7286.

Storm dumps about a foot in Fulton, Oswego area

By Debra J. Groom

It may have seemed like the end of the world on Wednesday, March 12.

But actually, it wasn’t even the worst March 12 the area has ever seen.

Weather observers in Fulton and Oswego tallied about a foot of snow for the area on Wednesday. Both Paul Cardinali in Fulton and William Gregway in Oswego said they have only estimates for snowfall because the wind was blowing so hard it was difficult to get a good reading.

“I have been doing this for 45 years,” Gregway said Thursday. “This was the most difficult day to try to get a measurement that I’ve ever seen. The wind was out of the North-Northeast and was gusting from 40 to 45 mph. I had drifts here where I’ve never had drifts before.”

Cardinali agreed.

“I shoveled off a couple of areas to check the snowfall early Wednesday,” he said. “Come afternoon, it was all over.”

Cardinali measured about 13 inches for Fulton while Gregway came up with about 10 inches in Oswego.

But Cardinali reminded everyone the storm of 1993 was also on March 12. He said Fulton tallied 20 inches on that day.

So perhaps this past Wednesday wasn’t really that bad.

Stone Soup Too comes to Fulton

With the need for food subsidy increasing and food pantries throughout Oswego County being hard pressed to meet the growing demand, the United Way of Greater Oswego County is doing its part to raise awareness of the food shortage in Oswego County and encourage the community to help fill the shelves of our area food pantries.

From 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Thursday, March 20, the United Way of Greater Oswego County will hold its sixth annual Stone ‘Soup Too’ Luncheon in Fulton.

Hosted by Holy Trinity Parish, 309 Buffalo St., Fulton, the United Way’s ‘Stone Soup’ Too Luncheon will draw upon the agency’s theme of ‘It’s Our Community … and It’s Personal.’

The United Way invites community members to come together to break bread, warm their hearts, gather with friends, and enjoy a delicious lunch of ‘Stone Soup while helping to support Oswego County’s food pantries that are struggling to meet the increasing demand for their services.

“This is our sixth year for our Stone Soup Too luncheon,” said Lois Luber, resource development director for the United Way of Greater Oswego County.

“It is the effort of our volunteers and committee members, and most importantly the strong support we receive from the community who return year after year to enjoy great food and fellowship that makes our Stone Soup Too luncheon such a success,” she said.

To date, a number of caring local businesses have come forward to donate the food and beverages necessary for the Stone Soup Luncheon.

Soups will be provided by: Mimi’s Drive-In, cheeseburger soup; Blue Moon Grill, cream of broccoli; The Foursome Dinner, ministrone; and Tavern on the Lock, vegetable beef and barley.

Dunkin’ Donuts is donating “Boxes of Joe”; C’s Farms & Davis Bros. will be providing the salad fixings; Red Baron will provide rolls; Kathy’s Cakes and Joe’s Corner Market are donating cookies; Hudson’s Dairy is providing water, and cake will be provided by Springside at Seneca Hill.

Luber added there would be table arrangements featuring canned soups, courtesy of Struppler’s Shurfine Market, that will be donated to the food pantries following the luncheon. The Fulton Lions Club also has donated $500 for the purchase of food for our local food pantries.

In addition to the luncheon, those in attendance will have the opportunity to win a number of door prizes, including gifts from Blue Moon Grill, Cayuga Community College, Price Chopper and Unique Hair Shoppe.

The United Way’s “Stone Soup Too” Luncheon is open to the public. The United Way is accepting donations of $5 per person. All proceeds from the luncheon will be used to support area food pantries.

Attendees are also encouraged to please bring a donation of non-perishable food, as the United Way will be collecting donations for area food pantries including the Salvation Army of Oswego County and Catholic Charities of Oswego County.

“Our food pantries are really feeling a strain this year and it is becoming especially challenging for them as they try to meet the demand for food subsidy throughout Oswego County,” Luber said.  “The food collected, and the money raised at our ‘Stone Soup Too’ Luncheon will be greatly appreciated.”

Those unable to attend the luncheon but would like to donate food items should call Tim Archer, director of Catholic Charities of Oswego County’s Emergency Services program, at 598-3980 for information on where to drop off non-perishable food donations throughout Oswego County.

For more information, call the United Way office at 593-1900.