Category Archives: Fulton News

Granby kindergarteners get the ‘royal’ treatment

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

Granby Elementary was treated to a royal parade recently, as kindergarten teachers lead their students through the halls, with the children wearing jeweled crowns and carrying scepters.

The parade was part of a culminating activity on the Common Core listening and speaking unit on kings and queens.

Kindergartners have been listening to read-alouds about kings and queens and royal families.

Many of the fictional rhymes, poems, and stories in this domain are classic, well-loved tales.

Students in Mary Ellen Ellis’s kindergarten class read King Midas and the Golden Touch, a story told in Greece long ago during a time where people made up tales to teach a lesson.

In the book a rich king wishes for something foolish, and learns a lesson a valuable lesson about consequences.

By listening to a variety of texts, the kindergartners built on their understanding of the responsibilities, lifestyle, and customs associated with royalty throughout history.

Meals, math on menu at Fairgrieve

Meals and math were served up at Fairgrieve Elementary School’s Lunch and Learn March 11 in the cafeteria.

Third-graders displayed their math prowess during a brain gym exercise, which got their bodies and their minds moving.

Elementary Academic Intervention Services teacher Kristine Kaufman said the activity helps bolster the students’ memorization skills when it comes to math facts.

“The students are expected to master multiplication and division by the end of third grade,” Kaufman said. “Brain gym helps with repetition and memory.”

After the brain gym exercise, students sat down with their parents and guardians to review number operations and number bonds.

The Lunch and Learn program is spearheaded by school/home liaison Ariana Suhr and was designed to give parents an up-close glimpse at the new curriculum implemented as part of the Common Core Learning Standards.

Fulton, Oswego residents take part in tough bike race

From left to right, Ron Molinari, Chris Caza, Scott Somers, Bryan Blake, Greg Mills, Jim Nicholson and Rick Bush. Absent are Teddy Volkomer, Josh Molinari and Jeff Ballard.
From left to right, Ron Molinari, Chris Caza, Scott Somers, Bryan Blake, Greg Mills, Jim Nicholson and Rick Bush. Absent are Teddy Volkomer, Josh Molinari and Jeff Ballard.

By Rob Tetro

Ten cyclists from Fulton and Oswego are in training for The Tour Of The Battenkill, considered “The Toughest Single Day Race In America”.

Bryan Blake of Central Square, Jim Nicholson, Chris Caza and Jeff Ballard of Fulton, and Scott Somers, Ron Molinari, Josh Molinari, Teddy Volkomer, Greg Mills and Rick Bush of Oswego will have their endurance put to the test when they take part in the 63-mile race in Cambridge, Washington County, April 5-6.

Cyclist Rick Bush said the team began training in November. The training process involves preparation for four basic periods: Base Training, Build, Peak and Race periods. Each period is designed to prepare cyclists for various parts of a race.

“Each period targets specific elements experienced in a given race.”, Bush said.

This year’s race will mark the third trip Bush and his teammates have made to Cambridge.

The Tour Of The Battenkill is known as “The Toughest Single Day Race In America” for a reason. As if the distance of the race wasn’t challenging enough, the participants face an uphill battle in more ways than one.

There is a section of the race that is a little more than 10 miles long that travels uphill on dirt and gravel roads. The challenge presented by the elements of the race aside, Bush points out The Tour Of The Battenkill also attracts an impressive array of cyclists.

Amateur and professional cyclists consider The Tour Of The Battenkill to be one of the premier events of their season. For Bush, being a part of this event means being a part of what he considers the most prestigious, challenging and rewarding races of the year.

He said the intensity of the training matches the difficulty of the race itself.

“The training for this one race is by far the most intense training of the season.”, Bush said.

For more information about The Tour Of The Battenkill, visit WWW.TOUROFTHE BATTENKILL.COM

Bush and his teammates express sincere gratitude to the sponsors who helped them make their third appearance in The Tour Of The Battenkill a reality — Murdock’s Bicycle and Sports, J&A Mechanical, Homestead Funding Group, Nicholson Law Firm, Summit Physical Therapy, Pathfinder Bank and Fajita Grill.

Fulton hoops on the up and up

By Rob Tetro

Seniors Mark Pollock, Seth Britton, Jeremy Langdon and Austin Haskins left their mark on the Fulton boys’ basketball program.

Despite facing some rough moments throughout their careers, they didn’t quit. Coach Matt Kimpland said it was the efforts of his seniors that set the groundwork for the improvements Fulton showed this season.

As his seniors move to the next phase of their lives, Kimpland hopes they are physically and mentally prepared to give their best efforts regardless of the challenge they face.

As it is every season, the Red Raiders faced some of the best teams Section 3 has to offer. Despite taking its lumps against some of these premier teams, Fulton proved to be far more of a formidable opponent than they were in other seasons.

In a season that saw the Red Raiders score 150 more points than they did a season ago, they also had a 5-13 overall record, which left them one game shy of qualify for Sectional play.

Kimpland said some of his younger guys can move on toward next season feeling confident, having seen what it takes to be competitive with the impressive opponents Fulton plays against year in and year out.

Looking ahead, 2014-15 figures to be an exciting season for Fulton.

After moving up to varsity last year as a freshman, Cody Green will return as junior.

This season, Green met every expectation coaches had for him. Even with teams striving to slow him down, Green scored 311 points this season.

Sophomores and juniors got a lot of playing this season and the Red Raiders hope to benefit from this next season.

A junior who had a memorable season was Chris Jones, with nearly a double-double in every game, including games against perennial powers Jamesville-DeWitt and Christian Brothers Academy.

Kimpland considers Jones to be the most improved player in the program. Despite showing progress over the summer, his breakout season was a bit of a surprise to his coaches.

Kimpland credits Green and Jones for how consistent their outside/inside play was this season and he is excited about what the duo can accomplish next season. Fulton also will see the return of third-leading scorer Josh Hudson next season.

Overall, the team appears excited and motivated headed into the off-season having doubled their win total from last season. Determined to build on the momentum the team established this season, seven of eight returning Red Raiders wasted little time beginning their preparation for next season.

The initiative his players have shown hasn’t gone unnoticed by Kimpland. In fact, he said Fulton’s future is even brighter because of the natural drive and enthusiasm his young team has displayed.

Valley Viewpoints

Rule changes needed

The Fulton Softball Association needs some major rule changes.

Every team has to pay a $415 entry fee, $150 players fee and $375 umpire fees for a total of $940 for a 15-game season.

Now let’s look at what they get for their money, 1 and 1 count, mat ball, moved the bases back to 70 feet, 6 to 10 for arc (half the time you can’t throw more than 8 feet), limited home runs, 20 run rule after three innings or 10 run rule after five innings and 1 hour time limit.

These are the reasons why a lot of teams and players wanted me to run the league, because it is not fair to them. They pay all this money and don’t have a say about the rules, why not let them have a say on some of the rules.

They don’t even get to elect their own board members. I have seen a lot of games in the last few years that didn’t go more than 30 minutes, so now they paid $62.66 to pay that game when you divide $940 by 15.

Now you wonder why people quit playing the game.

The fees are too high and the rules only benefit the league.

I have played, coached and sponsored teams in this association for 33 years and seen this association go from being a great place to play to having no fun to play in anymore. Every team should be entitled to play at least 5 innings or an hour and 20 minutes if they ar not at the run rule.

If you want to speed the game up, get rid of the mat and call the game, there are a lot of batters who will take a talk because the mat is too short.

The game is so easy for umpires now and don’t take this wrong guys, because I have umpired a lot of games with your guys and respect every one of you for the job you do.

But the players deserve a lot more than what they are getting for their money. I will say this to you, Mr. Ostrander, that you wrote a letter of recommendation for hiring to the mayor when I worked seasonal for your department not too long ago, along with a lot of aldermen.

Now why all of a sudden the change in what you wrote? So if I can’t take you as a man of your word about  what you wrote in that letter, then what can people believe from you. I offered to run this league for nothing to relieve some of the stress on the businesses that sponsor teams and to bring back the sport. Instead, you hire someone to do it — let’s just keep spending unnessary money.

I am not all about money, I donate a lot of my time to this community. This was my way of giving back to this great sport that my dad and I have played for years.

I guess the only person who truly was a man of his word was Don Smith. He hired me as a scorekeeper, field manager and let me run the first ever fall league in Fulton. He saw the same thing in me that you saw when you wrote that letter.

So it’s not like I don’t have the experience to do the job. In order to be in control of the league, you have to come there and check it out. If someone calls you about the league, you call the president you hired.

Look where that has gotten this league, two years in a row of a couple of teams playing without paying any fees. as the head of the recreation department, you should come there to check up on things, just like you do with War Memorial and North Bay Campgrounds.

This way you know how things are being run and if there are any problems that can be handled differently. Instead let’s just keep chasing things to do out of Fulton, with all these high fees and poor management on your part.

Frank Allen

Former player, coach and sponsor

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Saving our part of the planet

I do not recall the date, but clearly remember the moment, when a couple of friends of mine approached me about investing in a company that was making “conversion” kits for the Volkswagen beetle.

These kits would turn your “slug-a-bug” game or in the case of a few in our group, their flower power car, into a dune buggy.

Now being the owner of a Dodge Challenger convertible and a cult follower of anything mopar, I was not interested. DUMB IDEA……needless to say; even though it was a fad of sorts these two went on to make a lot of money.

Investing in your future comes in many forms. Maybe you go after an education to secure a comfortable position that pays you well. You take on leadership and walk in shoes that put you in the crosshairs of the public eye.

You value family, friends, and the simple moments in life that the “busy” crowd chooses to never see. Whatever path(s) you choose to walk down, you have some control over your destiny.

All of those investments in life, good or bad, all of those choices you make daily, and all that shapes you will still put you into one group. We all share a responsibility to take care of our planet.

Now let me clarify, I am not a “tree hugger” don’t know a maple from an ash tree, still get confused over which plastic is recyclable and which type is not. I don’t care if you smoke, I don’t, yet get upset with the idiot who thinks they can flip their cigarette butt out of the car window and it bounces off my windshield.

I am fully aware of the roadside trash, the litter from fast food, the select few who feel that they do not have to make arrangements for trash removal and dump anywhere and those who feel it is easier to just throw things out of the car window.

I cannot change those who will not make an attempt to do what’s right. I cannot wrap myself around the concept of cleaning up the entire planet. Of what I am aware, is that we have some amazing areas right here in our own neighborhoods.

We have it all: forests, trails, lakes, streams, green space, recreational spots, sporting areas and so much more.

So as the legislative member who sits on the EMC Committee (Environmental Management Council) for the County of Oswego, I have finally decided that I am going to get off of my comfy chair sometime during Earth Week, and go out to join a group and pick up the trash and litter of those who do not care about our counties, towns, villages, and neighborhood assets.

My goal is to fill one trash bag. Depending on the spot, that could be a quick commitment, or maybe not.

Will it make a difference? In the big picture of things, nah, not so much. I will feel better for a couple of reasons: I will have engaged in something new for me and……well, if another 500 or 600 people in this county did the same, then maybe we kick the door open a little.

I will go with a group who can tell me, “No, wait, that is recyclable!”  Then maybe in the long run my goal will have to be modified to learn new information and have two bags — one for recyclables and one for trash.

If you would like to join in to help “clean up the earth” in Oswego County, EMC suggests you organize a group or join one to clean up a local park or green space.

You can call 343-4565 or visit www.co.oswego.ny.us/earthweek.html to sign up for an Earth Week cleanup project, or for more information.

James Karasek, 

Oswego County Legislator

Light in the Darkness

“And they were calling to one another:   “Holy, holy, holy is the Lord Almighty; the whole earth is full of his glory.” (Isaiah 6:3). 

“Who among the gods is like you, O Lord?   Who is like you — majestic in holiness.”  (Exodus 15:11)

We are told that God’s Holiness is so central to His being that, “Holy is His name.” (Luke 1:49); and, because  we are told to, “be holy for He is holy” (several times in Leviticus and again in 1 Peter 1) it is important that we know what God means when He says that He is Holy.

Now this is not as easy a task as it may seem because God never tells us straight out what He means by His holiness. He can’t.

This is not because of any inability on His part but on ours. Words we would understand simply would do nothing to communicate what it means that God is Holy.

I like the way that A. W. Tozer put it.  “He is holiness Himself… beyond the ability of thought to grasp or word to express.  Language cannot express the holy, so God resorts to association and suggestion. He cannot say it outright because He would have to use words that we don’t know the meaning of, and we would then, of course, take the words He used and translate them downward into our terms.

“If He were to use a word describing His own holiness we could not understand that word as He uttered it. He would have to translate it down into our un-holiness. If He were to tell us how white He is we would translate it into terms of dingy grey.

“So, unable to communicate His holiness in words, God uses association and suggestion… he shows us His holiness by showing how that holiness affects the unholy.”

An illustration of what Tozer means by association and suggestion is seen when Moses comes into the presence of God at the burning bush (Exodus 3).

Moses is told to take off his sandals for he is standing on holy ground. Then, when Moses hears God say, “I am the God of your father, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac and the God of Jacob” he hid his face, afraid to look at God.

Another illustration is given in the book of Isaiah (chapter 6). The Prophet was given a vision of the Lord seated on a throne, high and exalted and when he hears the creatures around that throne crying, “Holy, holy, holy is the Lord Almighty; the whole earth is full of his glory” Isaiah says that he cried out, “It’s all over! I am doomed, for I am a sinful man. I have filthy lips, and I live among a people with filthy lips.”

In R.C. Sproul’s, “The Holiness of God,”  the author reaffirms that encountering God’s holy presence is the one thing that reveals to us our own great depravity and need.

“When we understand the character of God, when we grasp something of His holiness, then we begin to understand the radical character of our sin and hopelessness.”

How true. Jonathan Edward’s well known sermon titled, “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”  is often credited with beginning of a great spiritual awakening in America. It is unfortunate that both the title and the content lead readers to conclude that Edward’s emphasis was on the terrible flames of hell. On careful consideration, however, one realizes that the message reveals man’s utter sinfulness relative to a holy God.

Understood in this way, it becomes clear the theme of the message is not the fiery pit, but the Holy God who holds us from it, having prepared the way of rescue for those who believe. Edward’s sermon captured the essence of God’s Holiness in stark contrast to our un-holiness.

If we want to understand what it means that God is Holy, we must encounter that holiness first hand. When we do, that tremendous gulf that exists between His character and ours begins to sink in.

Only then do we begin to understand Proverbs  9:10 which tells us that,  “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, and knowledge of the Holy One is understanding.”

 

Pastor David M. Grey      

Mt. Pleasant 

United Methodist Church    

March 30 deadline to sign up for women’s bowling tourney

The Fulton Women’s Bowling Association 59th Annual Tournament will be April 5 and 6 at The Recreation Club in Fulton.

It will be team event only. Squad times are 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Saturday April 5 and 4 p.m. Sunday April 6.

Those interested in entering the tournament or needing more information may call Paula Distin at 593-6121. Entries for the tournament close on Sunday March 30.

Adult softball registration this week

Play Ball!

Despite rumors to the contrary, adult softball is alive and well in Oswego, and will be played this summer under the direction of the City of Oswego, at the Legends Complex.

Registration packets for softball teams in men’s and women’s slow pitch divisions, and men’s fast pitch and modified fast pitch leagues will be distributed from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, March 20 and Friday, March 21 and from noon to 2 p.m. Saturday, March 22 at the Ponzi Recreation Building at Fort Ontario (next to the Army reserve center).

To download the packet online or for more information, go to oswegosoftball.com.

The packet will include the registration costs, deadlines, insurance waivers, local rules, and all other information necessary for the upcoming season.