Category Archives: Fulton News

Classes available at CNY Arts Center during spring break

A number of classes are coming up at the CNY Arts Center during next week’s spring recess April 14 through 17.

** Digital Photography — $30 plus $1 material cost, 9 to 10:30 a.m. M-F,  ages 10-18, room 103. Instructor: Kendra Mattot. Students should plan to attend all sessions.

** Painting/Drawing $7.50/session

Monday — Acrylics on paper; Tuesday — drawing with pencils and ink; Wednesday — water colors on water color paper; Thursday — acrylics on wood. 9 to 11 a.m. Ages 4-1. Room 105. Instructor: Bonnie McClellan

** Story Time Art $7.50/session

M-TH, 11 a.m. to noon, ages 4-7. Room 103. Instructor: Kendra Mattot

Take one class or all

** Painting/drawing, $7.50 per session, Monday – acrylics on albums; Tuesday oil painting on canvas paper; Wednesday – drawing with pencils and ink; Thursday – acrylics on sheet music. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., ages 11-18. Room 105. Instructor: Bonnie McClellan

** Kids culinary, $13 includes materials, 2 to 4 p.m. Monday, ages 5 and up. Room is downstairs kitchen. Instructor: Diane Sokolowski

** Beginning Guitar, $7.50, 12:30 to 2 p.m. Tuesday. Room 103. Instructor: Gina Holsopple

** Glee Club $7.50/session, 2 to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday. Room 103, ages 10 and up. Instructor: Gina Holsopple

** Theatre Improv, $7.50, 12:30 to 2 p.m., Wednesday, ages 6-10. Room Theatre. Instructor: Jessica Tetro

** Theatre Improv, $7.50, 2 to 3:30 p.m., Thursday, ages 11-14. Room Theatre. Instructor: Jessica Tetro

All classes are held at CNY Arts Center, 357 State St. Methodist Church in Fulton through the Park Street entrance. Please visit www.CNYARtsCenter.com to pre-register or call 592-3373.

Sheats, Burns join insurance firm

Cheryl Sheats
Cheryl Sheats, personal lines account manager

Cheryl Sheats was hired recently as a personal lines account manager and Carol Burns was hired as a commercial lines account manager at Eastern Shore Associates Insurance.

Sheats will be based in ESA’s North Syracuse office and Burns will be in the Camden office.

“We are so pleased to welcome Carol and Cheryl to ESA,” said President Martha Murray. “In fact, in Cheryl’s case it’s welcome back. She worked at our Fulton and Oswego offices in the late 90s.”

Sheats has worked in the insurance industry for more than 24 years for firms in Oswego, Onondaga and Jefferson counties. She holds the Accredited Customer Service Representative certification and resides in Mexico with a son, 5, and a daughter, 14.

Carol Burns
Carol Burns, commercial lines account manager

Burns has more than 29 years in the insurance industry and holds the Chartered Property Casualty Underwriter (CPCU) certification. She has worked exclusively in commercial lines for agencies in Oneida and Rome, and she is a member and former vice president and secretary for the Utica CPCU chapter. She is also a member of the Insurance Professionals of the Mohawk Valley.

She resides in Lee with her husband, Tom. She has a son, daughter-in-law and two grandchildren.

Headquartered in Fulton, Eastern Shore Associates is a Trusted Choice® agency and employee stock owned company. ESA offers a full range of business and personal insurance, including property, liability, automobile, boat, farm, recreational vehicle, workers compensation, and bonds. In addition, they offer financial planning and risk management services.

Eastern Shore Associates Insurance has offices in Fulton, Pulaski, Phoenix, Camden, Waterloo, Rochester, North Syracuse and Walworth. Call the Fulton office at 598-6000.

Granby students persevere

Elizabeth Chrisman and Riley Lunn were among the students selected by their teachers for their exemplary behavior and representation of the month’s behavioral expectation: perseverance. The students selected were treated to a special breakfast with Principal Heather Perry (middle).
Elizabeth Chrisman and Riley Lunn were among the students selected by their teachers for their exemplary behavior and representation of the month’s behavioral expectation: perseverance. The students selected were treated to a special breakfast with Principal Heather Perry (middle).

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

March’s character education trait in the Fulton City School District was perseverance.

Students at Granby Elementary School selected at best representing that character trait were treated to a special breakfast with Principal Heather Perry.

Over a meal of breakfast pizza, fruit cups, cereal and juice, Perry asked students if they could define perseverance.

One student described perseverance as facing many obstacles, but never giving up.

The following students were honored with the breakfast and each received a special certificate: Angelina Ferro, Jadriel Baez, Allison Treneer, Lucian Perkins, Avery Nunez, James Carden, Natalie Mcrae, Lily Mccoy, Zachary Brown, Mylea Calabro, Hannay Mackey, Jeffery Landers, Lyle Cole, Junior Gomez, Hailey Payment, Brielle Sievers, Miguel Sanderson, Daniel Demott-Smith, Savanna Flynn, Dylan Sullivan, Madison McCarty-Castillo, Gabby Farnham, Preston Collett, Nathaniel Sivalia, Adrienne Santos, Skylar Blake, Nicholas Smith, Kaylee Holmes, Elise Morse, Aiden Trude, Adyson Shepard, Jasmine Clew, Donald Gates, Ethan Bardin, Cameron Brown, Aiyanna Kolb-Kee, Rose Mills, Reese Calkins, Nick Mariotti, Riley Lunn, Walter Crofoot, Rebecca Stone, Elizabeth Chrisman, Chloe Bonoffski, Jillian Crandall, Sean Hein, Dominic Berry, Leah Mansfield, Hannah Rice, Montanna Gardinier, Chelsea Redman, Morgan Schuyler, Makayla Nolin and Conner Schneider.

Ryan wins Rotary fellowship award

4-2_FULrotary

At a recent Rotary Club meeting, Sue Ryan, right, was presented the coveted Paul Harris Fellowship Award by Judy Young, foundation committee member and club secretary of the Fulton Noon Rotary Club. Paul Harris was the founder of Rotary International, the world’s largest and oldest service organization. Ryan, with her husband Don, are the owners of the Lock III Restaurant where the Fulton Noon Rotary Club conducts its weekly meetings. Sue and Don work closely with the Rotary, Kiwanis and Lions clubs in supporting their service work in our community.

Hodgepodge, by Roy Hodge

Born in a Grocery Store?

When I was born, my parents lived in the house attached to the family’s Red & White Grocery Store in Syracuse’s Valley section, which is why I suppose, that during my early years I may have thought that I was born in a grocery store.

I lived there with my parents until I was almost 2.

Valley Drive is a long residential street, which was intersected one block from our store and the house where we lived, by the busy Seneca Turnpike corner.

I remember, while I was growing up, staying overnight with my grandparents at that house and being fascinated by the bright neon lights of “Club Candee,” the busy nightclub which was located a block from the family store.

When I was a little older, I earned my allowance by helping Grandpa keep the empty cardboard cartons in an orderly fashion, and by delivering small orders and advertising flyers to the neighbors.

Through the years, I got to know many of the store’s regular customers. My grandmother always insisted that even though I considered many of those customers my friends, I should always address them by Mr., Mrs. or Miss.

One of the exceptions was Fanny Chapman, who was a daily visitor to the store, and also worked there part-time through the years. I guess I thought it was OK to call her by her first name, because it made me giggle every time she walked into the store.

In a column I wrote several years ago, I was remembering those grocery store years:

“One of the stories I heard told over and over by my grandmother all the time I was growing up and much longer was that I learned to walk by picking up two glass milk bottles from the back hall of our house and carrying them into the store.

“My grandmother was also fond of sharing pictures of me when I was about six or seven wearing one of my father’s store aprons which hung down to the floor.

“One of my favorite toys from the store was a long pole with a pair of ‘grabbers’ on the end, which was used to pull items from the store’s high shelves.  Using those grabbers to knock things off the shelves and all over the store was probably how I got revenge for having to parade around in that silly looking apron.”

“Do You Have Prince Albert in a Can?

From Hodgepodge, Dec. 24, 2005:

“For several years during the time my family owned a grocery store in the Valley section of Syracuse, I was able to leave a special gift for Santa Claus each Christmas Eve.

“Every year my father brought home a tin of Prince Albert Tobacco from the store, and my brother, sister and I left the special gift for Santa along with a plate of cookies, under the Christmas tree.”

(I can still picture that special Christmas time can with Santa enjoying a pipe full of his favorite tobacco.)

“Every Christmas morning there was a plate of cookie crumbs, a note from Santa, and Prince Albert was nowhere in sight.”

Do you have Prince Albert in a can?  Well, let him out! My father said he heard that comment many times during his years at the store.

Thinking a lot about the store this week, I have recalled that the store had a “gum ball” machine. I remember it sitting on the counter at the front of the store where customers “checked out.” As you might imagine, the gum balls were small balls of gum with a thin candy coating.

I often went with my father to the store when he visited on Sunday mornings. While he went about his business, I was putting pennies in the gum ball machine.

There were one or two special gum balls in the machine; I don’t know if they were even gum. They were very colorful, which made it easy to distinguish them from the other gum balls.

Looking for a “Winner”

Those gum balls were “special” – they were known as “winners” because if one of them came out of the machine when your penny was inserted that penny would “win” five more pennies – which of course would immediately be put back into the machine.

It wasn’t long before I learned to try to outsmart that gum ball machine. I knew that the “winner” wouldn’t come out if I could still see it in the machine’s glass globe.  So I shook and I jiggled until the coveted “winner” was out of sight, hopefully ready to come out when my penny went into the slot.

I soon discovered that all the shaking and jiggling was an exercise of futility.  All I had to do was to ask my father for more pennies. But I am sure that it would have added a little more excitement to my young life if a “winner” had come out of the gum ball machine.

Those days spent long ago at the family store with my father and grandparents are among the fondest of many memories.

A Couple More Things

No matter how much you push the envelope it will still be stationery.

I got a job at a bakery because I kneaded dough.

I read a book about anti-gravity. I just can’t put it down.

And, here’s one from Henny Youngman:

“A drunk goes up to a parking meter, puts in a dime. The dial goes to 60. The drunk says, “Huh I lost a hundred pounds.”

                                        . . . Roy Hodge

Longtime Fulton athletic official named to Hall of Fame

Don Distin, of Fulton, has been named to the Class of 2014 for the New York State Athletic Administrators Hall of Fame.

He and others were installed into the Hall of Fame March 14 at the Saratoga Hilton in Saratoga Springs. This was part of the New York State Athletic Administrators annual conference and Dave Martens Awards Luncheon.

Distin grew up and spent most of his life in Fulton. He was a staff sergeant in the US Army and member of the Signal Corps.

He was sent to Germany, and when the Army found out he could play football, he became captain of the 6th Armored Cavalry in 1952. The team won the European championship. He was also the trainer for the 6th Armored Cavalry boxing team.

Distin received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees, as well as permanent certification as director of health and physical education, from Ithaca College. He earned his administrative and supervision certificate from SUNY Oswego.

Distin was hired as a social studies teacher and head football coach at G. Ray Bodley High School in Fulton.

He is credited with starting the wrestling team in Fulton in 1959. In 1962, he became director of athletics and taught physical education. Three years later he was promoted to administrator of health, physical education and recreation for the Fulton City School District.

Distin served as president of Section 3 from 1978-80. He also was president of the New York State Council of Administrators of HPER, New York Stae Dental Health Teachers Association, Central New York Cities League and Central Zone President for Council of Administrators of HPER.

Distin was on the original organizing committee of the New York State Athletic Administrators Association in 1981 and attended the first organizational meeting in Binghamton. He was selected and served as the first past president for the New York State Athletic Administrators Association from 1981-83.

In addition to serving on many section, state and national committees, Distin also served as speaker at many of those state and national conference workshops.

He has had numerous honors bestowed upon him by his community, school, Section 3, state and national organizations.  Upon retirement, the new Fulton Athletic Complex was dedicated in his honor.

Distin has also served his church and acted as chairman of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes for the Syracuse area for five years.

Distin and his wife, Carolyn, were married for more than 50 years and had four children, sons Sherman and Mark and daughters Susan and Mary Beth.

After his retirement, they retired to Florida. Carolyn passed away in 2006, and Distin has been remarried to Judy, and they live in Avon Park, Florida.

In addition to Distin, those installed were in the hall of fame were:

** Robert Douglas (deceased), a member of the original organizing committee, second state president, first finance chair

** Joseph Farrell (deceased), Binghamton, original organizing committee and host of first official meeting.

** Dr. John Foley (deceased), national publications committee, state Public High School Athletic Association Hall of Fame,

** Alan Mallanda, Lake Luzerne, original organizing committee, fifth state president, second executive director, 14th national president, NIAA merit and hall of fame

** David Martens, Fairport, (deceased), original organizing committee, first state president, fifth national president NIAAA hall of fame and award of merit

** Mason Morenus, Homer, original organizing committee, conference presenter and organizer, Otis Sennett Award, NIAAA state delegate

** Bernie O’Brien, Section 8 executive director, original organizing committee, first treasurer, NIAAA award of merit, New York State Public High School Athletic Association Hall of Fame.

** Roy O’Neill, Mamaroneck (deceased), fourth state president, first executive director, NIAAA award of merit.

** Otis Sennett, Baldwinsville, original organizing committee, organized first conference, New York State Public High School Athletic Association Hall of Fame, NIAAA award of merit, NIAAA Hall of Fame.