Category Archives: Fulton News

Winners announced for High School Invitational Art and Photography Show

Best of Show award
Best of Show award by Mike Edwards of Oswego High
Viewers' Choice award
Viewers’ Choice award by Meghan Lentz of Birdlebough High

The Fulton Art Association has announced the winners of the eighth annual High School Invitational Art and Photography Show.

Eighty-eight students from high schools in Fulton, Hannibal, Oswego and Phoenix school districts submitted 103 pieces of artwork in fourteen different categories.

The show was created to help provide encouragement and guidance to high school artists and provide them a venue to display their talent and artwork.

Marsha Wheeler Marcarian, Arts-In-Education Coordinator for Oswego County BOCES, and Carolyn House Mosier, long-time FAA member and instructor at Cayuga Community College, Fulton, judged the show this year, which was held at the Fulton Municipal Building March 1 and 2.

 

Best of Show

Mike Edwards, an Oswego High junior,  for his Computer Graphic Art entry entitled Self Portrait, which included the Oswego Lighthouse reflected in his sunglasses.

Three-Dimentional

Laurelann Easton (senior, Oswego) took first place with her metalwork entry entitled Violate Text Bracelet.

Molly Brown (junior, Oswego) took second place with her jewelry entry, Geared to Fly along with Leah Shay Jones (junior, Oswego) for her Release Text Bracelet. Honorable Mention went to Childhood Memory, Metal by Aviriana Follet (senior, Oswego).

Acrylics

First place went to Maria Musemeci (junior, Phoenix) for her portrait painting, Fia. Second place was shared by Gianna Girafalo (senior, Phoenix) for her Black Bear canine painting and Brenna Riley (junior, Oswego for Sundae. Honorable Mentions were awarded to Nicole Fitzgerald (junior, Phoenix) for Weaping Tree and Taylor Simpson (senior, Fulton) for Aboriginal Original.

Ceramics 

Aviriana Follet (senior, Oswego) won first place for her Volcanic Safehaven entry. Two second place were granted to Cassondra Orr-Savage (senior, Fulton) for Life Through Henna and Hans Reichow (senior, Hannibal) for his Waldgeist.

Honorable Mentions were given to Jessica Allen (10th gr – Phoenix) for Clay Shark, Morgan Butterfield (12th gr – Oswego) for Silver Geared Teapot, Courtney Johnson (12th gr – Oswego) for Steam Punk Teapot, Emily Leonard (12th gr – Fulton), Elizabeth Reitz (12th gr – Fulton) for Animal Kingdom, Seth Rogers-Miller (12th gr – Fulton) for Tesselate, and Emily Schneider (11th gr – Phoenix) for Cookie Jar and Nesting Bowls.

Digital photography 

First place went to Christian Knox (senior, Hannibal) for Marsh Reflections. Two second place were granted to Dylan Cummins (senior, Hannibal) for Bum and Bailey Milliken (junior, Hannibal) for Trace of Light.

Honorable Mentions were given to McKayla Long (sophomore, Hannibal) for Glowsticks and Lindsey Wheeler (junior,  Hannibal) for Autumn Breeze.

Drawing A (pencil, graphite, charcoal) 

First place went to Allie Henderson (junior, Oswego) for her pencil drawing, Masquerade. Second place was awarded to Meghan Anderson (junior, Oswego) for Silence and Carolina Nicole (senior, Hannibal) for Tree Study.

Honorable Mentions were given to Katie Bradshaw (sophomore, Oswego) for Tranquility Before the Storm, Carrie Gilbert (senior, Oswego) for Spilt Soup, and Marissa Martin (senior, Phoenix) for Baby Willow.

Drawing B (colored pencil, Prismacolor)

First place went to Reilly Patrick (junior, Oswego) for Time Will Tell. Second place was shared by Reilly Patrick for Rusted Workshop and Carolina Nicol (senior, Hannibal) for Vintage.

Honorable Mentions were awarded to Meghan Anderson (junior, Oswego) for Does It Snow in Heaven, Katie Bradshaw (sophomore, Oswego) for In the Eye of the Beholder, Christian Cabanlig (sophomore,  Oswego) for Anonymous Gift, Makala Carson (junior, Oswego) for Feathers, and Meghan Rowe (sophomore, Phoenix) for Grandpa.

Drawing C (markers, pastels, pen/ink)

First place was awarded to Carolina Nicol (senior, Hannibal) for Rolling Forms, second place to Kathy Pittorf (junior, Hannibal) for Pastel Abstraction, and an Honorable Mention to Darian Stobart (junior, Phoenix) for Angel.

Painting Mixed Media

Honorable Mention was given to Jessica Morgan (freshman, Oswego) for her Steeple at Night.

Printmaking

Two Honorable Mentions were given to Morgan Haynes (freshman, Oswego) for Harings Hersheys and Michael Leach (senior, Phoenix) for Discombobulation.

Watercolor

First place was awarded to Meghan Lentz (senior, Phoenix) for Jay Walk in the Woods. He Loves Me, He Loves Me Not by Isabela Gonzalez (senior, Fulton) won second place.

All students in the four districts (including LEAH and Oswego Co BOCES students from those districts) are able to participate in the High School Invitational competition. Students also can join the Fulton Art Association and participate in its annual show that takes place in May. For information, contact President Kathryn Mihalek at 532-3803.

What kind of cloud is that?

Students in Exceptional Education at Oswego County BOCES recently created a display of wind and cloud systems as part of a science unit. Students researched types of cloud formations and illustrated altocumulus and cirrocumulus clouds using cotton balls. Poems were written from weather related words like hail and sleet. Pictured from Mary Ryan’s class are Austin Quinn, Antonio Tassone, Floyd Haywood, Luis Piscitelli and Cheyanna Dorr.
Students in Exceptional Education at Oswego County BOCES recently created a display of wind and cloud systems as part of a science unit. Students researched types of cloud formations and illustrated altocumulus and cirrocumulus clouds using cotton balls. Poems were written from weather related words like hail and sleet. Pictured from Mary Ryan’s class are Austin Quinn, Antonio Tassone, Floyd Haywood, Luis Piscitelli and Cheyanna Dorr.

Celebrating music at Fulton Junior High

Orchestra student Collin Bennett (foreground) laughs as Principal Ryan Lanigan plucks the violin during a guest solo.
    Orchestra student Collin Bennett (foreground) laughs as Principal Ryan Lanigan plucks the violin during a guest solo.

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

Fulton Junior High School’s Music Department recently held a spring concert as part of Music In Our Schools Month.

The seventh-grade orchestra, under the direction of Danielle Delfanian, performed the “Bushwascker Stomp”, “The Bachaneer” and “Guest Soloist.” Principal Ryan Lanigan was invited to “play” the violin, amusing both the student musicians and audience.

The eighth-grade orchestra performed “MacPherson’s Lament”, Irish folk song “Fiddle-me-oo-re-i-re-a” and “Chant, Chorale and Dance.”

The seventh-grade chorus, under the direction of Stephanie Almeter and accompanied by Cathy Chirello, sang “Rejoice in the Music”, “ I’ve Got the Music in Me,” and “Lift Me Up.” The last song featured soloists Courtney Miner, Luis Pagan, Kacey Markarian and Nick Brown.

The eighth-grade chorus sang “I Have To Sing”, “Cups” and traditional spiritual “Swing Down Ezekiel.” The second song featured soloist Alexis Phelps. Olivia Abrams, Mikahala Horning, Ariel Stacy, Julia Allen and Madison Wilson made up the rhythm section.

The seventh-grade band, under the direction of Debra Farden, performed two songs, “American Spirit March” and “Year of Dragon.” Eighth-graders performed “The Rowan Tree” and “John Williams: Movie Adventures.” Parents and community members hummed along to familiar movie theme songs, from E.T. to Star Wars.

Throughout the evening, students read short narratives, expressing what music meant to them.

“Without music, my life would be dull,” said one student. Another said music was a way to express her feelings.

 

Heavy equipment students head for the dirt

4-12_SCHOOLSheavyequipment

 

Spring has sprung and the students in Oswego County BOCES’ Heavy Equipment Maintenance and Operations program are ready to work in the dirt!

The curriculum for the program is aligned with the National Utility Contractors Association, and provides adult education students an opportunity to prepare for careers in the commercial and/or residential construction industry through classroom and hands-on training.

Pictured above are students Leroy Rayner, left, and Dan Kidd participating in one such hands-on exercise. The pair are utilizing a transit level to measure the depth of a path dug by a classmate operating a dozer during a grading and level exercise. For more information about the  program or other programs offered through the Adult Education Department, visit www.OswegoBOCES.org or call 963-4256.

Learning bike safety

4-12_SCHOOLSfairgrievebus

 

Safety Sue, the bike safety puppet, operated by Fairgrieve elementary sixth-grader Samantha Humphrey, accompanied Billie Crandall Brady from the Oswego County Traffic Safety Board, talks to students at the Fulton school about the importance of wearing your helmet while riding your bike, skate board, scooter or in-line skates. The students were given special smoke free message tattoos and were told that healthy brains are safe brains. All the rules of the road were discussed – riding on the right side and making full and complete stops at stop signs and stop lights. Brady also told everyone about an opportunity to learn to ride on a bike course from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 31 at the Fulton War Memorial. The free event, sponsored by the Fulton Police Department, will feature new helmets from the Governor’s Traffic Safety Committee and refurbished bikes from Doyle’s Bike Shop in Fulton given to children who can’t afford one. The event also will have a tricycle course, pedal cars, bouncy houses, crafts and free lunch.

 

Historical Fulton, NY

4-12_FULhistoryphoto
Foster Brothers Knife Works was a well-known manufacturing company on West First Street in Fulton from 1878 to 1979. At its peak, more than 135 people churned out all types of knives at the factory. Employment dwindled to 19 people by 1977. The company was started by brothers Frank and Allie Foster, who had developed a method for tempering steel for machine knives used in paper mills. The knives earned a local reputation for being of good quality and farmers started using them on their hog carcasses. Then other people started using the knives for other purposes. Younger brothers J.A. and C.F. Foster expanded the business into other types of knives. At one time, the company made knives of 500 different sizes, shapes and styles. The largest was a 4-foot-long splitting knife used by meat packers. The smallest (no size was specified) was used to dress poultry. Handles were made of wood from Panama and Nicaragua and rosewood and ebony from South America and Africa. J.A. Foster from the company went on to become Fulton’s first mayor. This photo shows workers at the plant in 1904. Information supplied by the Friends of History at the Pratt House.
Photo courtesy fultonhistory.com

Bodley business group elite in New York

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

The G. Ray Bodley chapter of the Future Business Leaders of America continues to be among the elite in the state as several members recently took home top honors in the regional competition.

FBLA co-advisers Danielle House and Angela Ferlito said the students set the bar high during the District 9 event held Feb. 7 in Liverpool.

The state competition is in April.

Some of those elite competitors include Laura Hamdan, Angeline Kimbrell, Kim Ingersoll, Meriah Dishaw and Yusra Hanayun, who each tallied first-place. Other Fulton FBLA members who earned a spot in the Top 3 included Kari Holbrook (second place), Kim Rombough (third place), and Tattiana Pierce (third place).

In addition to competitions, the Fulton chapter of the business association has conducted fundraising for many causes.

“They’ve done fundraising for the March of Dimes, the Ronald McDonald House (and) the Golisano Children’s Hospital,” Ferlito said. “They put in a lot of time and effort to be part of FBLA.”

Hodgepodge

Bands Were Big!

I have enjoyed the music from the “Big Band” era for many years.

The “Big Band” era and the musical sound called “swing” began in the late 1930s. There were hundreds of popular big bands during that period in the 30s and 40s, and your parents and grandparents may have danced to some of them.

Some of the most popular bands included Ray Anthony and his orchestra, Louis Armstrong’s orchestra, Louie’s wife, Lil Hardin Armstrong and her orchestra, the bands of Charlie Barnett, Count Basie, Tex Beneke, Bunny Berrigan and Les Brown.

Bob Crosby’s Bob Cats and the Dorsey Brothers, Jimmy and Tommy and their orchestras, Ray Eberle’s band, the Roy Elbridge, Duke Ellington and the Les and Larry Elgart orchestras were also active.

Also included were Ziggy Elman, Maynard Ferguson, Ella Fitzgerald’s orchestra, Dizzy Gillespie, the Benny Goodman and Jackie Gleason bands (yes, that Jackie Gleason), Lionel Hampton, Erskine Hawkins, Fletcher Henderson and Woody Herman.

Ina Rae Hutton was the leader of an “all-girl orchestra” and dancers and listeners were enjoying the bands led by Harry James, Louis Jordan, Sammy Kaye, Hal Kemp, Stan Kenton, Andy Kirk, Kay Kyser and drummer Gene Krupa.

Also on the road were Guy Lombardo and the Royal Canadians, Jimmy Lunceford, Wingy Manone, Billy May, Glenn Miller and Ozzie Nelson (Ricky’s father), as well as the Tony Pastor, Don Redman and Luis Russell orchestras.

Artie Shaw and his Big Band, singer Maxine Sullivan and her all-stars, the Jack Teagarden orchestra, as well as his other smaller groups, were traveling from city to city as were Tommy Tucker, Fats Waller, Chick Webb, Teddy Wilson, Paul Whiteman and Sy Zentner with their bands.

Whew, and that’s only part of the 30s and 40s big band lineup. During World War II, the Big Bands boosted morale throughout the world.

Ish Kabibble

The Kay Kyser Big Band was one of the Big Band era’s most successful groups.  The band had 11 number one records, 35 top 10 hits, a top-rated radio show for 11 years, starred in seven feature films, and outdrew the Glenn Miller and Benny Goodman orchestras.

Ish Kabibble was one of the band’s feature characters, created by Merwyn Bogue, who played cornet in the Kyser band.

The name came from Bogue’s comedy version of an old Yiddish song, “Isch Ga Bibble.” Loosely translated it means “I Should Worry?” which he performed with the Kyser orchestra.

The public and the band started calling him “Ish” and the name stuck.

Michael (Mike) Douglas (not the actor who is Kirk’s son), a name you might recognize – Mike was the lead voice on many Kyser hits (Ol’ Buttermilk Sky, “The Old Lamplighter”).  He was best known to American television viewers as a singing variety/talk show host.

“All or Nothing at All”

One of the world’s most popular singers emerged during the 30s after singing “All or Nothing at All” on a Major Bowes amateur radio broadcast, fronting a quartet known as “the Hoboken Four.”

Frank Sinatra (“Ol’ Blue Eyes”, “The Voice”, “Chairman of the Board”, “Swoonatra” and “Sultan of Swoon”) sang during the Big Band era with the bands of Harry James and Tommy Dorsey.

He went solo at the Paramount Theater in New York in 1942. His first of hundreds of record hits was “All or Nothing at All.”

Sinatra was indeed “Chairman of the Board” of the company he founded, Reprise Records, in 1960. Along with Dean Martin, Sammy Davis, Jr., Peter Lawford and Joey Bishop, Sinatra was a member of “The Rat Pack.”

The Market

One of our favorite Saturday morning activities is to visit the Regional Market.  Admittedly, the market isn’t as exciting this time of year as it is in mid-summer through late fall when it is busting out with the fresh home-grown produce of those seasons.

But even on a Saturday in late March there are treasures to be found.

My wife was happy with the sack of yellow potatoes, which she says are hard to find in supermarkets – and make the most delicious mashed potatoes and French fries.

My market tastes are more likely to lean away from carrying a 10-pound sack of potatoes around to standing in line for free samples of everything from chocolate chip cookies to pretzels covered with   “maple-flavored crème” to hunks of bread dipped in “politely spicy” hot tomato sauce.

(Question: “How much spice makes something to be impolite?”)

Also free for the taking and perfect as part of my late Saturday morning breakfast were hunks of cheese and sausages and hands full of tasty crackers slathered with all kinds of dips and spreads.

I think the top attention-grabber of the day on our recent visit to the market might have been a bright green “Spinachburger.”

The market seems to be a popular social hub on Saturday visits. Recently, we have met up with friends from Syracuse, from Fulton as well as from our own neighborhood.

There is a lot of everything at the Regional Market. Sometimes the only thing that you might have some difficulty finding is a good parking spot.

 

. . . Roy Hodge