Category Archives: Fulton News

Woman finds Friends of Fulton Parks medallion

Audrey Avery, of fulton, right, found the hidden medallion in the Treasure Fulton Parks 2014 Medallion Hunt contest sponsored by the Friends of Fulton Parks. She found it Wednesday afternoon in Van Buren Park. With her on the left is her daily hunting partner, Donna LeVea.
Audrey Avery, of Fulton, right, found the hidden medallion in the Treasure Fulton Parks 2014 Medallion Hunt contest sponsored by the Friends of Fulton Parks. She found it Wednesday afternoon in Van Buren Park. With her on the left is her daily hunting partner, Donna LeVea.

The Valley News has been notified that the medallion for the Treasure Fulton Parks 2014 Medallion Hunt was found today.

The medallion hunt is now over, so no more clues will be running in The Valley News.

We’ll have more news later.

Chiropractors help out United Way

Area chiropractors will offer Patient Appreciation Day April 26 in support of the United Way. Shown getting ready for the event are Dr. Richard Falanga, Dr. Brent Tallents, Dr. Beth Dubois, Lois Luber, Dr. Richard Tesoriero, Dr. Casey McCaffrey, Dr. Dustin Wahrendorf, and Dr. Jason Cunningham.  Absent from photo are; Dr. Franklin Perkins II, Dr. Michael Soucy, Dr. Ryan Barker, Dr. Anthony Licatese. All proceeds go to the United Way.
Area chiropractors will offer Patient Appreciation Day April 26 in support of the United Way. Shown getting ready for the event are Dr. Richard Falanga, Dr. Brent Tallents, Dr. Beth Dubois, Lois Luber, Dr. Richard Tesoriero, Dr. Casey McCaffrey, Dr. Dustin Wahrendorf, and Dr. Jason Cunningham. Absent from photo are; Dr. Franklin Perkins II, Dr. Michael Soucy, Dr. Ryan Barker, Dr. Anthony Licatese. All proceeds go to the United Way.

Chiropractors throughout Oswego County will host a special Patient Appreciation Day in support of the United Way of Greater Oswego County.

On Saturday, April 26, participating chiropractors will offer chiropractic treatments for current and former patients, as well as examinations for new patients in exchange for a $20 donation to the United Way of Greater Oswego County.

“Patient Appreciation Day is a wonderful opportunity for health conscious individuals to receive an important examination and valuable information at a very affordable price,” said Melanies Trexler, executive director of the United Way. “You really can’t afford not to take advantage of this rare opportunity.”

All proceeds from the day will benefit United Way of Greater Oswego County and the many member agency programs that the United Way supports.

Chiropractors participating in Patient Appreciation Day include:

Falanga Family Chiropractic 

Oswego – 343-2961

Dr. Beth Dubois

Dr. Richard F. Falanga

 Family Chiropractic Office

Fulton – (315) 593-7555

Dr. Brett R. Tallents

McCaffrey Chiropractic

Oswego – (315) 342-3877

Dr. Casey McCaffrey

Perkins Chiropractic

Hannibal – (315) 564-7022

Dr. Franklin L. Perkins II

Tesoriero Chiropractic

Oswego – (315) 343-5713

Dr. Richard Tesoriero

Licatese Chiropractic

Oswego – (315) 342-6300

Dr. Anthony Licatese

Dr. Ryan Barker

Active Chiropractic – Oswego 

Dr. Jason Cunningham (315) 383-9614

Dr. Dustin Wahrendorf (315) 591-1091

Advanced Wellness Chiropractic 

Mexico – (315) 963-8700

Dr. Michael Soucy

Those interested in Patient Appreciation Day are urged to call the participating chiropractor of their choice and schedule an appointment as soon as possible.

For more information, call one of the chiropractors or the United Way at 593-1900.

Hazardous waste collection site opens May 3

Submitted by Oswego County

Oswego County residents will be able to safely dispose of unwanted chemicals, pesticides and other hazardous waste products beginning Saturday, May 3, at the Oswego County Household Hazardous Waste Disposal Facility.

Located at the Bristol Hill Landfill, 3125 State Route 3, Volney, the facility will be open Wednesdays from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Saturdays from 8 to 11 a.m. from May through September.

Managed by the Oswego County Department of Solid Waste, the program is free to Oswego County residents.

The household hazardous waste disposal program is sponsored by the Oswego County Legislature and the state Department of Environmental Conservation.

“The household hazardous waste collection facility gives residents a convenient way to safely dispose of expired chemical products and unwanted hazardous wastes,” said Frank Visser, Oswego County Solid Waste Director.

“This method of household hazardous waste management has proven to be cost-effective and user-friendly. Materials are packaged and stored in a secure area until a sufficient amount has accumulated for shipping,” Visser said.

Customers should pull their vehicle up to the side of the building, which is located between the transfer station and solid waste offices.

Drivers should remain in their vehicles and wait for materials to be unloaded by the solid waste department staff.

These items are accepted at the collection facility:

Adhesives, aerosols, antifreeze, auto batteries, light ballasts (non PCB), brake fluid, cements, degreasers, disinfectants, dry gas, flea products, fluorescent bulbs, gasoline, hobby chemicals, household cleaners, insect repellants,  lacquers, lighter fluids and  lubricants.

Also: mercury containing devices, oil-based paints (no latex paints will be accepted), paint removers and thinners, pesticides, pool chemicals, rat poisons, rug and upholstery cleaners, solvents, turpentine, varnish, weed killers, and wood stains.

A complete list of materials is listed on the solid waste department web site at www.oswegocounty.com/dsw/hhw.html.

Materials should be in their original containers and placed in sturdy cardboard boxes. Leaking containers should be wrapped in newspaper and placed in a clear plastic bag.

Dried latex paint, used motor oil, household batteries, cell phones, computers, electronic equipment, and appliances containing CFC refrigerant are accepted year-round at the transfer stations.

There is no charge for recycling electronic equipment such as computer monitors, microwave ovens, fax machines and televisions. There is a $15 fee to recycle appliances that contain CFC refrigerant.

Visser requests that, for safety reasons, people do not bring children or pets to the collection site. Smoking is prohibited in the unloading area.

When lines are long, cars may be turned away so that materials can be processed prior to facility closing.

The Solid Waste Department also accepts hazardous wastes from Oswego County businesses that meet the regulatory requirements. Business owners should contact the Solid Waste Office to find out if they qualify and to obtain a cost estimate for disposal of materials.

For more information, call the Oswego County Solid Waste Office at 591-9200, or visit the Department of Solid Waste Web site at http://www.oswegocounty.com/dsw/index.html

County Health Department clinics for week of April 21

Submitted by Oswego County

The Oswego County Health Department offers a variety of services to all residents of Oswego County, including preventive health services, certified home health care, long-term home health care, certified hospice, and a maternal and child health program.

Walk-in influenza clinics are held weekdays from 9 to 11 a.m. and 1 to 3 p.m. at the Nick Sterio Public Health Clinic, 70 Bunner St., Oswego for people age 19 and older. No appointment is needed; walk-ins are welcome.

Children’s flu vaccine is now available every Tuesday from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. in Oswego, and the third Tuesday of every month from 9 to 11 a.m. at the H. Douglas Barclay Courthouse, Pulaski.

The children’s flu vaccine is available at no cost to all children who qualify for the Vaccines for Children Program provided by the New York State Department of Health. For those who do not qualify, the cost is $37 for the inactivated vaccine.

The health department accepts cash or checks for payment. The department does not accept credit or debit cards. Patients with private insurance, Managed Medicaid, Managed Medicare, Medicaid, Medicare, and Medicare Part B should bring their benefit cards with them to the immunization clinic.  No one will be turned away due to inability to pay.

The following services will be offered during the week of April 21 at the Nick Sterio Public Health Clinic, 70 Bunner St., Oswego.

OSWEGO:

** Adult Influenza Clinic: Monday through Friday, 9 to 11 a.m. and 1 to 3 p.m., walk-in clinic.

** Immunization Clinic: Tuesday, April 22, 12:30 to 3:30 p.m., walk-in clinic.

** Pregnancy Testing: Free pregnancy testing is available. Call 349-3391 to schedule an appointment.

** Sexually Transmitted Disease Testing and Treatment Services: Call 349-3547 to schedule an appointment.

** HIV Counseling and Testing Service:  Call 349-3547 to schedule an appointment.

Immunization clinics are held every Tuesday from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. at 70 Bunner St., Oswego, and the third Tuesday of every month from 9 to 11 a.m. at the H. Douglas Barclay Courthouse, Pulaski.

For more information about public health services, contact the County Health Department, weekdays, phone 349-3547 or (800) 596-3200, ext. 3547. For information on rabies clinics, call 349-3564.

Poetry Corner

Muck Farm Moment, by Jim Farfaglia

I love to drive by them in spring,

black soil waking my winter eyes

weary from landscapes of white.

 

Oh, how their richness stretches far,

how they open  with such promise

and foretell a bountiful season.

 

Soon, farmers will draw their tractors

back and forth, back and forth,

breaking open that promise

 

and planting it with hope;

trusting sun and rain and time

to reward their months of toil.

 

One day, their dreams come true

in a green, glorious goodness—

something we can only imagine

 

when we drive by each spring.

Valley Viewpoints

Fulton zone changes

Regarding the above mentioned article on page one, of the Saturday April 5, 2014 edition of the Valley News, there was some important information left out of this article, that I feel that the residents of the 6th Ward, City of Fulton should be aware of.

After the Mayor and the Common Council heard concerns from a local Realtor and a landlord, I was given the opportunity to speak on reasons I thought that encouraged the Common Council to act on this zoning change in the 6th Ward.

I’ve mentioned since my campaign that the main concern to the 6th Ward, to which I try to make a difference, is the quality of life that everyone should enjoy from day-to-day.

Unfortunately, I’ll get calls from residents in the 6th Ward, concerning issues such as people arguing over bad drugs they’ve purchased; at 6 a.m. yelling out to each other, in front of certain rental properties.

Also, residents have found beer bottles, cans, used needles, and strewn trash in their yards.

This should not, and will not be tolerated by the good residents that work hard, pay taxes and keep their properties looking great.

While there are great landlords in Fulton, there are still a few landlords who just don’t care, and consequently, the neighborhood surrounding these few undesirable rental properties have to deal with the above issues, sometimes on a daily basis.

As the article did state, future legislation by the Common Council will address the Realtor and the landlords concerns. Also, the Common Council will pass further legislation to try to continually improve the quality of life for the hard-working residents in Fulton.

In the future, I’m hoping that the Valley News will print all the information given, to include that given by the Common Councilors, who have certain issues, pertaining to their respective Wards.

Larry Macner

6th Ward Councilor

City of fulton

Light in the Darkness

“A very great multitude spread their clothes on the road; others cut down branches from the trees and spread them on the road.  Then the multitudes who went before and those who followed cried out, saying:   “Hosanna to the Son of David!  ‘Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord!’  Hosanna in the highest!”   Matthew 21:8-9

Chuck Warnoc, a small church pastor and regular contributor to Outreach Magazine, in a message titled, “What Kind of King Did You Expect?,” wrote, “If Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem was triumphal on Palm Sunday, what went wrong less than a week later?

Why did the crowds who adored Jesus on Sunday, turn on him by Friday of that week?” Both the title and the questions are thought-provoking.

This is especially so in this day when there are so many different ideas and images of just who Jesus really is. Paul implied early on that there would be those who would proclaim a gospel (s) different from the one revealed by Jesus.

Such a perverted gospels would, come from men emanating from the human heart which God long ago warned is, “deceitful above all things and desperately wicked.”  (Jeremiah 17:9).

Such were the hearts of many in that crowd who greeted Jesus that day He rode into Jerusalem. It was the day we now call Palm Sunday, remembering the palm fronds and garments they used to pave His way.

They had their own idea who Jesus was and what He had come to do. And they were wrong.

A few days later, when they realized that Jesus was not who they had expected Him to be, many turned on Him and joined the crowds crying out for His crucifixion.

Not that their expectations did not seem reasonable to some degree. Certainly the Jewish people were right in their anticipation that a king would come from the line of David. Years before they had heard the rumors that this king had been born in Bethlehem.

And, after all, what do kings do but protect their people from their enemies?  In their case it was the occupying Roman forces.

What you might not know is that Jesus’ arrival in Jerusalem that day was not the only one the people witnessed. Historians tell us that Pontius Pilate had come to Jerusalem that same day. He knew that the Passover Feast celebrated the deliverance of the Jews from their Egyptian oppressors. He was also aware of the rumors that a King and deliverer had been born of the Jews and there were rumors that Jesus was that king.

That, combined with the increased activity among the Zealots and others, caused Pilate to consider Jerusalem be at ‘Code Red’.

So, though his preferred headquarters was in Caesarea-by-the-Sea, he had traveled with a contingent of his finest military to Jerusalem just in case. On that day of two spectacular entries into Jerusalem, Pilate’s was a show of military might and strength while Jesus’ was meant to demonstrate just the opposite.

But back to the problem of the heart. All that threatening display of might and power on Pilate’s part, along with the heightened awareness that God was doing something spectacular caused many to believe that the deliverer, the Son of David, had come to dramatically overthrow the Roman oppressors and that meant the army which had just arrived.

Their desires for freedom and deliverance, fed by fertile imaginations led them to unbiblical expectations. Jesus was coming to show Rome who God’s people were!

Talk about anticipation and excitement! But a few days later they realized their mistake. Yet having made wrong assumptions, they did not blame themselves as they ought to have done, but rather turned on Jesus.

Oh, how he had let them down. He was, in many eyes, a fraud who had gotten their hopes sky high only to dash them to the ground and so,  “Crucify him!!”, they screamed.

What do you do when the Jesus you thought you knew doesn’t do for you as you expected? In your disappointment do you turn away from Him or do you in humility, recognize who it is who was wrong?

The true test of faith and those who prove they have it, are those who remain faithful and obedient even when the Savior disappoints. They recognize that the disappointment resulted not from His lack of love or ability, but from our own desires and expectations that distorted our image of who He is.

Pastor David M. Grey      

Mt. Pleasant United Methodist Church 

Fulton Park of the Day, Wednesday April 16 — Foster Park

4-16_FULfosterstone

Twenty stones looking like this one are hidden in Foster Park.

 

Find one and begin your collection of stones from the various parks in Fulton. Each day a different park will be highlighted on this Valley News website — find out what the park of the day is and go there to find a stone.

 

By April 19, folks should have collected 10 stones. Bring them to a ceremony at 4 p.m. April 22 in Recreation Park to win a small prize.