Category Archives: Fulton News

Fulton Community Theatre presents ‘2 Across’

February will see a mixture of romance and crosswords played in dinner theatre setting as Fulton Community Theatre presents “2 Across.”

The comedy by Jerry Mayer, which kicks off FCT’s 24th year, will run weekends, Feb. 8, 9, 14, 15, and 16 at Tavern On The Lock, 24 S. First St., Fulton.

The comedy will be presented as a dinner theatre offering, with Friday and Saturday dinners beginning at 6 p.m. with a 7:30 p.m. showtime. On the two Sunday matinees, dinner will begin serving at 2 p.m., with a 3:30 p.m. curtain time.

Tickets for a buffet dinner and show are just $25 for adults, $23 for seniors and students.

Show only tickets are $12 for adults and $10 for students and seniors. Reservations may be made by calling Tavern On The Lock at 592-2661.

The show tells the tale of two strangers, Josh and Janet, who meet on a commuter train. They are alone in the car, both doing the New York Times crossword.

She’s an organized, sensible psychologist. He’s a free spirited, unemployed ad exec. She is a crossword pro, he always quits. They learn from each other, argue, laugh, reveal big problems, they kiss.

But will they meet again?

“2 Across” features the talents of Valerie Roscoe-Dedich as Janet and Donald Crowe as Josh. Both will be familiar faces to Fulton Community Theatre audiences. Valerie was featured in the comedy farce “Bedside Manners,” while Donald appeared last season in “Alone Together” and “Curtain Up On Murder”.

The production is under the direction of Michael A. Bolio.

Jerry Mayer is a veteran writer of stage, movies, and television. His writing credits include several stage plays, as well as writing for television shows such as M*A*S*H, All in the Family, The Bob Newhart Show, and The Mary Tyler Moore Show.

Fulton Community Theatre’s production is a Central New York debut of his comedy.

The play, which is the second Valentine’s Day-themed show for FCT, is also the first dinner theatre venture for the theatre in many years. It was an annual staple for many seasons, and is something that the theatre has been looking at since it resumed active production in 2010.

“We believe that this comedy really fits well in a dinner theatre setting, and we hope our regular patrons will come out for a great night of dinner and entertainment, and that others who haven’t been to our shows before or in a while, will come and join us,” said theatre Artistic Director William Edward White.

For more information, contact the Fulton Community Theatre at its website, www.fultoncommunitytheatre.org, or by emailing fultoncommunitytheatre@gmail.com

Senior citizen news

Granby Center Senior News

Our meeting for the New Year was very good. We had 46 members at the Jan. 16 get-together. Seemed good to see so many of our seniors.

Cards made by Nancy were won by Jeanette Pauldine. The 50/50 was won by Jeanne Smith.

Kitchen committee for Feb. 6 is John Krupa, Jean Cronk, Ruth and Bob Sheldon and Imo Lefort. For Feb. 20, the kitchen committee is Fran Wadas, Donna Babcock, Joanne Gardner and Imo LeFort.

We had a very good speaker — Rachel Baglia from Oswego Health. She was very informative about blood pressure and hypertension.

Trips were discussed by Joanne Gardner.

Submitted by E. Martin

Volney Seniors

Early on Dec. 4, the roads were covered with ice. It warmed up and like magic, the ice was gone. We had many seniors make it to the meeting.

Fifty-seven of us made it to our Thanksgiving dinner at Bristol Hill Church. The meal was so good.

Our new member is Barbara Wallace. Welcome aboard.

Birthdays — Therisa Caltbiano, Gordon Smith, Roy Crouch and Denise Munger. We wish you all many more healthy, happy ones.

A 57th anniversary is being celebrated by Charlie and Rita Murphy. Congratulations.

On Dec. 14, we had our Christmas dinner at Seneca Hill. It was so beautiful with the big Christmas tree all decorated. I always try to sit at a table where I can look at the tree and enjoy it all the time we’re there.

The 50/50 winner for November was Mary Sugar and for December it was Mary Lalanga.

Submitted by Alma Bowering

 Phoenix Senior Citizens Club

At the club’s annual Christmas Party Dec. 13, the newly elected officers were installed by installing officer Arlene Slaski.

Trip Coordinator Martha Arnold announced that in February we will be carpooling to Heid’s in Liverpool for their famous hot dogs and coneys. She asked everyone to save the 2 for 1 coupons that are featured in the newspapers.

Cars will leave the town building at 10:30 a.m. People can drive ahead and meet the others at Heid’s if they choose.

We had a pot luck covered dish birthday and anniversary celebration Jan. 10.

The next business meeting for the Phoenix Senior Citizens club of the Town of Schroeppel is at 1:30 p.m. Friday Feb. 7 at the town of Schroeppel building on Route 57A.

If Phoenix schools are closed that day, there will be no meeting or covered dish dinner that day.

The next pot luck covered dish birthday and anniversary celebration dinner is at 1:30 p.m. Friday Feb. 14. Bring a dish to pass and your own table service. Coffee, tea, hot chocolate and lemonade are provided.

The senior club is always looking for new members age 50 and over to join. Dues are $5 per year and can be paid to Treasurer Peggy Sayles at any meeting or dinner. For more information, call President Joanne Czajkowski at 622-1239.

Paul N. Schremp, worked at Black Clawson

Paul N. Schremp, 57, of Fulton, died Tuesday, Jan. 21.

Paul was an Army veterans and worked at Black Clawson in Fulton for the past six years.

Survivors include his wife, the former Darlene Rupert Schremp; a son Ryan Schremp; two daughters, Jennifer (Drew) Williams and Kayla (Dylen) Walker; his mother, Elizabeth Schremp; four brothers, Mike (Liz) Schremp, Ray (Connie) Schremp, Jerry (Shirley) Schremp and Mark (Lisa) Schremp; two sisters, Rita (Marty) Higgins and Terrye (Tom) Plonka; four grandchildren; several nieces and nephews.

Funeral services will be held at 9:30 a.m. Saturday Jan. 25 (Today) at Holy Trinity Catholic Church, 309 Buffalo St., Fulton. Calling hours were Friday Jan. 24 in the atrium of Holy Trinity.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society.

Harter Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

Margaret A. Beckwith, longtime athletic booster

Margaret A. Beckwith, 79, of Fulton, passed away peacefully at home surrounded by her loving family Saturday, Jan. 18, 2014 after a long illness.

She was born in Fulton, NY to the late Anthony and Elizabeth White.

Mrs. Beckwith was a graduate of G. Ray Bodley High School and a lifelong resident of Fulton. She retired from Niagara Mohawk after more than 40 years of service.

Mrs. Beckwith was an active volunteer and member of the Fulton Athletic Booster Club for many years and served as treasurer for 25 of those years.  Margaret received many accolades as both an athlete and avid sports fan.

However, one of her proudest and honored achievements was being recognized with a scholarship named in her honor for the senior female student athlete of the year.

Margaret’s greatest passion was the love she had for her family, friends and beloved Yankees. She was a permanent fixture at most sporting events, but none more so than her own grandchildren from whom she would watch with pride and admiration.

Mrs. Beckwith was pre-deceased by her husband of 46 years George W. Beckwith in 2011, and her siblings, Henry, Ralph, Janette, Joseph, Fred and Edie.

She is survived by her loving family George (Christine) Beckwith of Fulton, and Bill (Sue) Beckwith of Fulton and much-loved grandchildren Megan, Courtney, Austin, Callie and Evan, and several nieces and nephews.

There will be a spring burial in St. Mary’s Cemetery with a graveside service. A gathering for family and friends will follow the cemetery service in the spring.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Margaret’s name to the Fulton Athletic Boosters Club, C/O Daniel Shue, 31 Aspen Cove Lane, Fulton, NY 13069.

The Sugar Funeral Home, Inc., 224 W. Second St. S., Fulton, has care of the arrangements.

Hodgepodge, by Roy Hodge

No Business Like Snow Business

The first time I mentioned the fateful “S” word in this space was in my third column when the short article was about Fulton’s first winter festival.

“Hey Dad, I went down and signed up for the snow sculpturing contest; it will be fun.”

That’s how the Saturday afternoon adventure started. The family members were gathered together in our front yard at the beginning.  Then, the chief adviser had to leave to do her grocery shopping.

There were a couple of mysterious disappearances, and some shouted directions from inside the window; finally, the fearless leader was alone in the front yard with a 20-foot-long hunk of ice cleverly disguised as a vicious dragon generously slathered with green food coloring.

And then the proud declaration the next day:  “Hey Dad, I won.”

In January, 1980 I wrote about the arrival of winter – “I knew winter weather had finally arrived in Fulton last week when everybody in our household was frantically looking for mittens, boots, snow pants, scarves, etc. . . . and when someone said, How many days until spring?”

“There’s No School Today!”

Adam was worrying about snow days in 1981.

“Since it was snowing hard when we went to bed, I shouldn’t have been surprised by the knock on the bedroom door in the morning.

“Mom, Dad, guess what, there’s no school today.”

There were columns about cross country skiing and neighbor Matt MacDowell, snow blower doctor.  It was Matt’s skillful touch which brought our faithful friend back to life from impending doom time after time.

During ensuing winters, I wrote about how winter weather causes us to reminisce about the hot days of last summer and last year’s vacation; and how some of us brag about our winters: “Our schools are allotted five ‘snow days’ a year but we didn’t use them because we ‘only’ got 200 inches of snow.”

In one column, I was trying to explain what a blizzard was, and in another I was talking about the winters I enjoyed as a kid: “When we were kids we used to think that Syracuse had more snow than other place in the world.”

Years later, living in Fulton certainly changed my mind about that.

Another year I admitted that I was never ready for winter, and the next year I was wondering whether the stormy weather we were getting should or shouldn’t be called a blizzard.

Winter Questions

In February, 1993, I was pondering many questions I had been asked: “Enough snow for you?”, Do you think it will ever stop snowing?”, “Where are we going to put all this snow?”, “How much snow have we got?” “Is there school today?”

And on and on.

As the years went on, I felt like a refugee of winter: “My car doesn’t have one of those electronic voices but if it did I know it would be telling me to ‘Go back inside stupid, it’s 20 degrees below zero out here.’”

I thought I would feel better if I reviewed the “Blizzard of ’66,” and every year I called John Florek at the water works and talked about the city’s depressing snow figures.

As the century turned I was exclaiming. “My car, it’s back, out there on the deck. What I was looking at was our outside cooker with a pile of snow on it.

The cooker itself was the body of the car, the shelf next to it was the hood. There were two little round piles that resembled wheels.  The cooker sits out there all year long and it’s a cooker; we get six inches of snow and it becomes a car.”

251 Inches; Then, “Unsnowiest” Winter

It was March 10, 2001 and Fulton had received 251 inches of snow for the 2000-2001 snow season.

When I called John Florek in January, 2002 he said it had been the “unsnowiest” winter since records had been kept in Fulton.  The city ended up with a total of 100.5 inches of snow that year.

In February 2007, I wrote that Fulton schools were closed for the fourth time in five days.  In January 2009 I was reminded that people in my family, who were farmers, used to say that a year of heavy snow would be a good year later on.

The official proverb puts it this way: “A year of snow, a year of plenty.”

In January 2010, I was telling readers that the first patents for snow plows were issued in the 1840s.  On Feb. 12, 2011, I noted some of us like to see snow in December, not so much in January, a little less in February, and don’t want to hear the word in March.

Monday, Jan. 30, 2012: While I was out in our driveway in Syracuse clearing away 3 inches of light snow, Jeff was in Fulton working on moving 3 feet of a new snowfall around.

A year ago, on Jan. 5, 2013, I was thinking about the winter days my friends and I spent at the dump – the natural in- the-backyards hill at the end of our street – with lots of roller coaster-like bumps and jumps.

Now, it’s January, 2014 – I am supposed to be taking our Christmas tree down, but I’m looking out the window at the 3 or 4 inches of new snow we have received here in Syracuse.

“It’s probably 2 to 3 feet in Fulton,” I thought.

Addendum:  Sometimes I have written about winter and snow at least as early as October – maybe September.

Oct. 6, 1981: After I stumble over the snow tires out in the garage for the fourth or fifth time, I figure that someone thinks it’s time to put them on the car. . . and when the windshield scraper finds its way out of the depth of the trunk, or wherever it has been, the end is really near.

My mind is remembering a Fulton snow storm in March of 1993, after which I was too busy shoveling snow to write a column.

But, after all, it was most likely “just another day” in Fulton’s winter story. The storm that I am remembering happened on Jeff’s birthday; the two of us spent the day shoveling snow.

Happy birthday, Jeff!

. . . Roy Hodge 

SAM North American opens expanded site in Schroeppel

By Ashley M. Casey

Sung An Machinery’s North American arm — better known as SAM-NA, LLC — has made a new home for itself in the Oswego County Industrial Park in Schroeppel.

Local legislators and business owners attended the center’s ribbon cutting Jan. 21.

The 10,000-square-foot facility houses SAM’s new Extrusion Technology Center and marketing office, which will allow SAM’s North and South American customers to see firsthand how new extrusion and lamination technologies can be applied.

The facility currently employs seven people — mostly engineers — but is projected to hire seven more.

Extrusion coating is a process that binds multiple layers of polymers together to create flexible packaging and other products, such as potato chip bags, juice cartons, disposable diapers and plastic packing tape.

Based in South Korea, SAM has headquarters in Italy and Granby, N.Y. and more than 600 machine installations in 27 countries across the globe.

SAM-NA has had an office in Granby since 2010, which has been a support and service organization for SAM-NA.

“We’re excited about this. It’s a great addition to the Industrial Park,” said L. Michael Treadwell, CEO of the County of Oswego Industrial Development Agency and executive director of Operation Oswego County.

Treadwell said that SAM first contacted IDA about expanding in the summer of 2011.

“They had to sell this project to the parent company in South Korea,” Treadwell said.

Officials from SAM’s Korea headquarters visited the Industrial Park and agreed to purchase and modify the building, which sits on two-and-a-half acres of land. The building previously served as the IDA’s startup “incubator” site.

Andy Christie, managing director of SAM-NA, said that the company made a lot of modifications to the building before moving in, including new power, floors, a furnace and other renovations. Treadwell estimated the investment in the building to be about $2.5 million.

“We’ve made a substantial investment to improve this building, as well as bring in the pilot extrusion and laminating line,” Christie said.

The pilot machine, which is mainly for demonstration and product testing, cost about $2 million. A full-size extrusion machine costs $3.5 million.

“Ninety percent of the (work) was done by Oswego County contractors,” Christie said.

Holly Carpenter, a spokesperson for New York state Sen. Patty Ritchie, said that Sen. Ritchie extended a warm welcome to SAM-NA’s new business site and applauded their support of local contractors.

“Small business is the backbone (of New York state), and we’re so pleased to have you here,” Carpenter said.

“It just gives Oswego County another success story in terms of attracting manufacturing with an internationally known company,” Treadwell said.

Yes, it’s been cold — but we haven’t set any records

By Debra J. Groom

Yes, it’s been cold.

It was bone-chilling a couple of weeks ago and it’s frigid again now.

And while it may seem odd to have this many cold days in a row, this is nothing compared to two years in the past.

That’s it – think back to February 1979, says local weather observer Paul Cardinali, of Fulton.

That month, there was a stretch of 13 days of temperatures less than 0, he said. And in the more than 40 years that he’s been keeping records, Fulton hit its all-time low of minus 26 on Feb. 18, 1979.

“The average temperature in February 1979 was 10.7 degrees,” he said. “Boy, that is cold. That’s the coldest February I’ve ever recorded.”

The same was true over in the Port City of Oswego. Weather observer William Gregway said the mercury plunged to minus 20 there on Feb. 18, 1979.

Now more recently, the Fulton and Oswego areas plunged into a deep freeze in January 2005.

Gregway said Oswego posted temps at 0 or below 0 for eight days between Jan. 18 and 28. Cardinali said Fulton also recorded temperatures at 0 or below for 10 days from Jan 18 through Jan. 31.

“We haven’t experienced the prolonged cold periods lately that I can remember,” Gregway said.

Even the cold from a couple of weeks ago seems a distant memory considering what happened after that cold snap ended.

Cardinali said temperatures were below 0 on Jan. 2, 3 and 4. But then the mercury started to climb.

“It was 52 on Jan. 10 and close to 50 on Jan. 12,” he said.

The Weather Channel forecasted Fulton to see its last minus temp Thursday night. Then temperatures are supposed to go up – slightly – to a raging high of 26 by Saturday (today). Lows still will be a bit nippy in the single digits or low teens.

And The Weather Channel has that trend continuing through next Friday, Jan. 31.

Cardinali said the one thing that made this week more bearable than earlier in January was the wind. During the Jan. 2-4 cold snap, the winds were whipping, making wind chills of minus 25 degrees. This most recent cold was mostly temperature only with very little wind.

Fulton temperatures in January 2005
Jan. 18, minus 3
Jan. 19, minus 1
Jan. 20, minus 2
Jan. 21, minus 13
Jan. 22, minus 17
Jan. 23, minus 11
Jan. 24, minus 11
Jan. 28, minus 14
Jan. 29, minus 1
Jan. 31, 0

Fulton temperatures in February 1979
Feb. 1, 9
Feb. 2, 9
Feb. 3, minus 8
Feb. 4, 9
Feb. 5, 7
Feb. 6, minus 2
Feb. 7, minus 4
Feb. 8, minus 10, Feb. 9, minus 8
Feb. 10, minus 16
Feb. 11, minus 22
Feb. 12, minus 24
Feb. 13, minus 16
Feb. 14, minus 25
Feb. 15, minus 10
Feb. 16, minus 2
Feb. 17, minus 20
Feb. 18, minus 26
Feb. 19, 3
Feb. 20, 0
Feb. 21, 18
Feb. 22, 32
Feb. 23, 30
Feb. 24, 30
Feb. 25, 20
Feb. 26, 20
Feb. 27, 20
Feb. 28, 20

Veit buying Scotsman Press Inc.

Badoud Enterprises, Inc., owned by John J. Badoud, Jr. of Virginia, today announced it has signed a definitive agreement to sell the assets of its sole operating unit, The Scotsman Press, Inc., to its current President, William G. Veit. 

Incorporated in 1954, Scotsman produces award-winning, community-focused publications and serves hundreds of other publications through its commercial printing services to customers throughout Central New York. The sale of the company to Veit will increase Scotsman’s value to its employees, customers, vendors, and other stakeholders, as the company will become an even more integral part of the CNY community and media market now under the direction of local ownership.

With the change of ownership, Veit’s new company will acquire assets including, The Valley News, Today’s CNY Woman, Finger Lakes Vacationer, and other publications, along with plant equipment, vehicles, and the company’s Chenango Bridge facility. The company will continue to do business as The Scotsman Media Group, maintaining all of its operating divisions in Syracuse, Chenango Bridge, and Fulton, New York, and there are no plans to change the company’s workforce of 96 employees as a result of the transition. Improvements to the company’s information technology systems are presently underway to ensure that Scotsman’s outstanding customer service, quality print media, and advertising solutions to the CNY marketplace will continue.

Veit and his wife, Linda, along with their two daughters, are lifelong residents of Syracuse, residing in the Onondaga Hill area. Veit has been employed by the Scotsman Media Group since 1990. He earned his MBA from Le Moyne College;  his wife, Linda, is employed by Upstate Medical University and received her masters in public health from Syracuse University and Upstate.

The transaction is expected to close on March 31, 2014.