Category Archives: Fulton News

Fulton boys’ basketball goes 1-1 in last 2 games

By Rob Tetro

The Fulton boys’ varsity basketball team went 1-1 in its last 2 games and now have a 5-9 overall record.

On Jan. 24, Fowler knocked off Fulton, 76-71, but then the Red Raiders bounced back with an exciting 53-49 win over Chittenango on Jan. 29.

The first quarter of the Fowler game was pretty event, with Fulton leading by 1 point at its conclusion. The second quarter was even more competitive, with both teams scoring 24 points as Fulton took a 38-37 lead into halftime.

Fowler pulled ahead during the third quarter, outscoring the Red Raiders by 4 points to take a 3-point lead and then Fowler outcored Fulton by 2 points in the fourth quartr to pull out a 5-point win.

Leading the way for Fulton was Chris Jones with 20 points, followed by Cody Green with 17, Josh Hudson with 12, Jon Cummins added 9 and Mark Pollock and Dallas Bradley chipped in 5 points each.

Fulton had a 2-point lead over Chittenango after the first quarter of its Jan. 29 contest. But Chittenango stormed ahead during the second quarter, outscoring Fulton by 7 points to take a 30-25 halftime lead.

The Red Raiders answered right back during the third quarter, outscoring Chittenango by 7 points to take a 2-point lead. Chittenango still had plenty in the tank and following a hard fought fourth quarter, Chittenango forced overtime after tying the game at 49.

The Red Raiders stepped up their defensive play down the stretch. While scoring only 4 points during the overtime session, Fulton kept Chittenango off the scoreboard en route to a 53-49 win.

The Red Raiders were led by Chris Jones with 20 points, followed by Cody Green with 13 and Jon Cummins with 11 points.

State police continue to investigate Granby man’s death

State police are following “several leads” in the death of a Granby man this week.

The body of Anthony Miller, 46, who lived in a mobile home at the Indian Hills Mobile Park on state Route 48 in Granby, was found by friends about 4 p.m. Monday in the mobile home. At first, troopers were calling the death suspicious, but later Monday said it had been ruled a homicide.

Trooper Jack Keller, public information officer for Troop D in Oneida, said the autopsy has been completed but state police are not releasing a cause of death at this time. He would not say if the body suffered any stab wounds or gun shots.

“We want to wait on that,” he said of the cause of death. “We’re following several leads and we are progressing.”

Anyone with information regarding Miller’s death should call State Police in Fulton at 598-2112.

Investigators believe there is no danger to the public concerning this death.

 

Fulton Speed Demons strong as swim season begins

The Fulton YMCA Speed Demons team has begun its season and already turned in some strong performances.

The team consists of swimmers ages 5 to 18 and is part of the CNY YMCA Competitive Swim League that includes Auburn, Norwich, Watertown, Oneida, Oneonta and Cortland.

Swimmers can compete in the freestyle, breaststroke, backstroke, butterfly and individual medley (IM, one of each stroke).

Events are categorized by age group: Seniors Class A (age 15-18) , B( 13-14) & C (11-12), Juniors Class D (9-10) & E (8 & under).

Coaches enter swimmers in three individual events each meet plus a relay. Practices and home competitions take place at Granby Elementary School in a 25-yard pool and swimmers push themselves at each dual meet to achieve a personal best swim time in the event swimming.

Taking a few seconds off an event time is often a challenge. The team is coached by Head Coach Cassandra Izyk and Assistant Coaches Cameron Lanich, and Ashley LaDue.

The Speed Demons started their season with an away meet in Auburn followed by a home meet against Cortland.

Starting the season strong against Auburn with first place finishes were first-year swimmer Joely LaPage (25 free), Ryan Morehouse (100 back) and Casey Jones (100 back).

Swimming personal best times were:

Naomi Roberts (50 free, 100 free, 50 back)

Angel Croci (50 free)

Alexis Loomis (50 free, 100 free)

Annaliese Archer (50 free, 50 fly)

Swimmers saw their hard work at practice pay off at the second meet of the season against Cortland.

Junior  swimmers Molly Williams and Courtney Pierce were 2 of 26 Fulton swimmers entered in the 100 Free and had the greatest time reductions of all events, crushing their previous times by 15 and 16 seconds.

Senior swimmer Anna Guernsey achieved the same improvement in her 200 IM. Junior teammate Hailey Coady posted a best time in the 25 back, taking 1st place.

Additional swimmers recording improvement in their events were:

Caleb Trepasso (50 free, 100 free)

Braeden Dempsey (50 free, 100 free, 50 back)

Tyler LaDue (50 free, 100 free, 50 back)

Zachary Loomis (50 free, 100 free, 50 back)

The Sportsman’s World — Of Flounder and Sheepheads

By Leon Archer

I was just this week talking with a friend in Florida about fishing.

I was interested specifically in the fishing in the Indian River Lagoon, because it had been so poor the past couple of years. He told me it was still nothing to get excited about in the Sebastian area, but it was a little better than last year.

Apparently some sea grass has started to grow here and there on the sand flats. He said it is a red grass, but it must be better than nothing. Grass makes all the difference in the river fishing.

I can’t begin to remember the number of times I’ve grumbled about the grass back when it was thick, and I had to keep removing it from my lures or bait. How I wish it were that way again.

Most of the grass then was some shade of pale green depending on the species and area it was growing in. There were patches of the red grass even then, but not any great amount of it.

When I fished in and around the grassy patches, I caught fish and grass. When I avoided grassy areas, I came up with less grass, but I also caught a lot fewer fish.

The reasons are simple. The grass acts as a nursery for small fish and crabs, providing food and cover. Most people would not believe the huge number of organisms that can inhabit a relatively small patch of grass, many of them are the microscopic creatures that baby fish and crabs capture for their early meals.

Just as the grass provides food and cover for the smaller inhabitants, at the same time it provides cover for larger fish who prey on the smaller, and so it goes right up the old food chain. But without that first link made of grass, the chain never forms.

I sure hope the grass makes a strong comeback. Even though I am not in Florida this winter, I certainly plan to be back there next winter, and I’d like to find the fishing better than I did the last two years.

My friend was telling me that it had been a good winter for sheepshead and flounder. They aren’t the kind of fish that prowl the grass beds.

The sheepies hang around docks and pilings. They seldom eat fish. Their teeth are made for nipping barnacles and small oysters off pilings. They are also fond of crabs, shrimp and sand fleas. They aren’t the easiest things to hook, being probably the most proficient bait stealers I’ve ever had the pleasure of meeting.

They are well worth pursuing, because they rival snappers for their table qualities. They are yummy.

The flounder are occasionally found in the grass, but more likely, if they are there at all, they will lurk just outside the beds waiting for an unwary small fish to wander out to see what the big world outside the grass looks like.

Flounder are fast predators when they strike, and a small fish seldom gets a do-over. Flounder are more often found on the flats at the edge of channels and in inlets where the current constantly brings them small fish struggling to hold their place in the fast tide water.

Flounder are fun to fish for, and the greatest challenge is to keep from getting hung up on bottom as one fishes. Most fishing is done with mud minnows or finger mullet kept near the bottom with a sinker weighing two to four ounces.

The bait needs to move back with the current until it is right in front of the waiting flounder. If everything goes right, and one has a bit of luck, a tap and then a feeling of weight almost like being hung up, will be transmitted up the line to the rod. Sometimes it is a false signal and one is actually hung up on bottom, but when the rod responds with a throbbing bend when the hook is set, it becomes worth all the time and effort.

Flounder are wonderful table fare, and one that weighs seven or eight pounds will feed a family with some left over for a snack later. They are mild and do not have the delicate flavor of the sheepshead or snapper.

I have never caught a lot of southern flounder, but I have caught enough to appreciate everything about them. They are a great fish, and the lack of grass has not had as negative an effect on them as it has with fish like the spotted sea trout.

I have enjoyed my time in Washington with our grandson, but I sure have missed Florida. I haven’t missed the weather Fulton has been getting, however.

Stay warm. Spring is coming.

Fulton girls’ hoops loses 2 of last 3

By Rob Tetro

The Fulton girls’ varsity basketball team went 1-2 in its last 3 games and now have an overall record of 5-9.

On Jan. 24, Fulton rolled past Fowler, 50-29. Corcoran came away with a 48-40 win over the Lady Raiders Jan. 28. Chittenango held off Fulton, 43-41 Jan. 29.

Fulton got off to an impressive start in the Fowler game, outscoring their opponents by 14 points during the first quarter.

Even though Fowler cut into their lead during the second quarter, the Lady Raiders took a 23-10 lead into halftime.

Fulton added to its lead during the third quarter, outscoring Fowler by 7 points to push its lead to 20 points. The Lady Raiders outscored Fowler during the fourth quarter to cap off a 50-29 win.

Fulton was led by Nicole Hansen with 23 points, followed by Michaela Whiteman with 9, Sydney Gilmore with 7 and Courtney Parker added 5 points.

In the Corcoran game, the first period ended pretty even, with Corcoran leading by only 3. Then Corcoran added to its lead in the second quarter, outscoring Fulton to take a 25-21 halftime lead.

After both teams scored 12 points each during the third quarter, Corcoran had maintained its 4-point lead. But Corcoran was a little too much down the stretch, outscoring Fulton by 4 points to win by 8.

Leading the way for the Lady Raiders was Sydney Gilmore with 10 points, followed by Nicole Hansen with 8, Michaela Whiteman with 6, Courtney Parker chipped in 5 and Jennah Lamb, Mallory Clark added 4 points each and Hunter Hartranft chipped in 3 points.

Fulton jumped out to a 6-point lead over Chittenango during the first quarter of their game. Chittenango outscored the Lady Raiders during the second quarter, but Fulton still had a 24-19 headed into halftime.

Chittenango pulled ahead during the third quarter, outscoring the Lady Raiders by 8 points to take a 3-point lead. Then the Chittenango scoring machine continued in the fourth quarter and they beat Fulton by 2 points.

Fulton was led by Nicole Hansen with 17 points, followed by Courtney Parker and Michaela Whiteman with 9 points each.

‘Safe haven’ meeting set for Feb. 11 in Fulton

By Ashley M. Casey

The Catholic Daughters of America, Court Pere LeMoyne #833, are holding an informational meeting about the “Safe Haven” program at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 11 at the Fulton Municipal Building.

Timothy Jaccard, founder of the AMT Children of Hope, will present a program and answer questions about an anonymous, safe drop-off system for unwanted infants.

In July 2010, New York state updated the 2000 Abandoned Infant Protection Act to remove criminal liability for parents who surrender unwanted infants to a “safe location,” usually a hospital, fire station or police department.

A person may drop off an infant less than 30 days old — no questions asked  — as long as the child does not show any sign of being abused or harmed.

Patty Mancino, regent of the local Catholic Daughters of America chapter, saw Jaccard speak at a statewide Catholic Daughters of America conference last April.

After Catholic Daughters of America Program Coordinator Teresa Kempston contacted Jaccard with questions about his Safe Haven program, Jaccard offered to come speak in Fulton.

Jaccard sent promotional materials, and Catholic Daughters of America has been spreading the word across the area through decals on Menter Ambulances.

“He’s the one that has worked so hard into making the law,” Mancino said of Jaccard.

In January 2011, Liverpool police found a newborn girl who had suffocated to death in a Dumpster.

The child’s mother was sentenced to 13 years in prison after pleading guilty to first-degree manslaughter in her daughter’s death.

Safe Haven programs, which are available across the country, have been instituted to give parents a legal alternative to abandoning and risking the lives of their infants.

“Upstate, it hasn’t caught on like it has in other parts of the state,” said Fulton Mayor Ronald L. Woodward Sr.

He said the meeting would serve to educate local agencies about the “Safe Haven” program and how agencies and organizations can  become a safe drop-off location.

Mancino said Kempston has invited area fire departments, local legislators and the Greater Fulton Area Council of Christian Churches to the Feb. 11 meeting.

“You can’t just leave a baby on a step or a porch. It’s not safe,” Mancino said. “There’s got to be some help out there to save these lives.”

Mancino said the idea has piqued the interest of several local fire departments. The general public is invited as well.

“The more you sit at the dinner table and discuss these controversial topics is how you get them out there,” she said.

“I think it’s good that people are educated, and young girls know they have an alternative,” Woodward said. “We’d certainly feel very, very bad if something like that happened in this community when there were other alternatives.”

Mancino acknowledged that training Oswego County agencies to be Safe Haven locations is a big endeavor.

“It’s got to start someplace. Baby steps,” she said.

For more information about the Safe Haven informational meeting, call Catholic Daughters Regent Patty Mancino at 598-9748.

 

BOX:

Need help?

To find the Safe Haven location nearest to you, call AMT Children of Hope’s anonymous, confidential hotline at 877-796-HOPE (4673).

To learn about safe drop-off locations under the Abandoned Infant Protection Act, call 866-505-SAFE (7233).

Visit the New York state Office of Children and Family Services website at ocfs.ny.gov for more resources.

 

CNY Arts Center hires technical director

John Gamble is the new technical director for theater productions at the CNY Arts Center, 357 State St., Fulton.

As technical director, Gamble will oversee set building, painting and prop design for productions in rehearsal, including Searching for Eden: The Diaries of Adam and Eve, and Willy Wonka, Jr.

Other productions are planned throughout the year.

“We are thrilled to add John to our artistic staff,” said Nancy Fox, executive director. “This is a hugely important role in theatre and demands close attention to safe and cost effective construction techniques.

“John not only has training and experience in set and prop construction, he also has a deep passion for the challenge of finding creative solutions,” Fox said. “A tree made of cardboard and burlap comes to life in John’s hands, a hefty looking rock is actually soft and spongy when applying techniques for building safe but realistic looking everyday items.”

Gamble, a graduate of SUNY Oswego’s theater department, quickly moved into professional theatre after graduation. He has theater credits with New York Stage and Film in Poughkeepsie, Mac-Hayden Theater in Chatham and in Dubai helping set a world record for the largest fireworks display for Grucci Family Fireworks.

After returning to Oswego to be near family, John was recommended to CNY Arts Center through a mutual acquaintance.

“We found his skills and dedication to his craft to be a great asset and a perfect fit for our needs,” Fox said. “He immediately took on both productions scheduled back to back and has EDEN almost performance ready with the show opening Feb. 14.

“He will jump right in to Willy Wonka Jr. and lead teams of parent volunteers in a huge set build involving painted backdrops, waterfalls, factory machinery with moving parts, and all the demands of the familiar story,” Fox said.

“For his part, John has expressed excitement for the prospects of a professional theater in Oswego County where he can work and continue to live close to family,” Fox said.

“It is the desire of many artists who must choose between sacrificing artistic pursuits in favor of employment to stay in the area near family or move away and sacrifice family connections to pursue employment and artistic outlets in more urban areas,” Fox said.

Common Council discusses insurance overruns

By Ashley M. Casey

The Common Council’s budget workshop, scheduled for today, Feb. 8, has been canceled.

Mayor Ronald L. Woodward discussed the workshop’s only agenda item — the 2013 health insurance overrun — at the Feb. 4 Common Council meeting.

Woodward told The Valley News the city’s spending on health insurance ran over by $512,000 last year.

“It put us into deficit spending,” he said. “We’ve got to go through the accounts and cover that spending.”

The mayor said the city’s financial consultants predicted a surplus of $500,000 in October 2013.

“Two months later, we ended up with a deficit,” Woodward said. “You can’t predict who’s going to get sick.”