Category Archives: Fulton News

Fulton wrestlers compete today to go to New York State Tourney

By Dan Farfaglia

All wrestlers in Section 3 today (Saturday, Feb. 15) are competing at Onondaga Community College for the right to represent their weight class at the New York State Tournament,  which will be held in Albany Feb. 28 and March 1.

In order to take part in today’s event, they had to place in the top five in their Class tournament.

Last Saturday at Indian River High School, the Fulton Red Raider wrestling team finished in first place in the Section 3 Class As.

Overall they accumulated 264.5 points and 16 of their wrestlers earned the right to participate in today’s state qualifiers.

Mitch Woodworth (120 pounds), Travis Race (160 pounds) and Jonathan Earl (132 pounds) finished the day as champions in their individual weight classes.

Joe Abelgore (106 pounds) and Collin Flynn (145 pounds) came in second place.

Finishing in third were Kevin Tucker (113 pounds), Tim Holden (138 pounds), Kyle Ware (also at 145 pounds), Aaron Yablonski (152 pounds), James Bailey (170 pounds), Noah Gates (182 pounds) and Matt Marshall (220 pounds).

Coming in fourth place were Nick Noel (99 pounds), Mitch LaBeef (126 pounds) and Malachi Manford (285 pounds).

Jacob Bailey (152 pounds) won the fith place prize.

Fulton varsity hockey finishes season on a sour note

By Rob Tetro

The Fulton varsity hockey team went 1-4 during its last 5 games of the season.

The team finished the season with a 2-18-1 overall record.

On Jan. 26, Lake Placid rolled past Fulton, 6-2. The Red Raiders knocked off Ontario Bay, 6-4 on Jan. 29. On Jan. 30, Watertown-IHC held off Fulton, 4-3. Watertown-IHC also won the Feb. 3 rematch with the Red Raiders, 5-1.

Syracuse (a team consisting of several Syracuse-area players) cruised past Fulton, 5-1 on Feb. 4.

Lake Placid jumped out to an early 3-0 lead over Fulton in th first period and carried the 3-goal advantage into the half.

The Red Raiders were unable to get any closer during the game, as Lake Placid outscored Fulton by a goal during the third period en route to the 6-2 win.

The Red Raiders were led by Bryce Knight and Austin Vashaw with a goal each. Following Knight and Vashaw were Seth DeLisle and Stan Kubis with an assist each. Goalies Spencer Evans and Brandon Ladd combined to save 35 shots.

After a hard-fought first period in the Ontario Bay game, the teams were tied at 1-1.

Fulton stormed ahead during the second period, outscoring Ontario Bay by 2 goals to take a 4-2 lead. Both teams scored 2 goals during the third period as the Red Raiders came away with a 6-4 win.

Leading for Fulton was Bryce Knight with 4 goals and an assist. Trae Sheldon had a goal and an assist. Seth DeLisle is credited with 3 assists and Ross Ryan tallied an assist. Goalie Brandon Ladd saved 21 shots Ontario Bay sent his way.

Watertown-IHC escaped with a hard fought win over the Red Raiders. the game was tied at 1-1 following the first period and then Fulton built a lead in the second to take a 3-2 lead into intermission.

Watertown-IHC made the most of the third period, putting the puck in the net to tie the game at 3 and force overtime. Watertown-IHC then scored the game winning goal in overtime.

Fulton was led by Bryce Knight wiht a goal and an assist. Seth DeLisle and Rocco Cannata had a goal each while Trae Sheldon is credited with 2 assists. Matt Billion also tallied an assist. Goalie Brandon Ladd saved 41 shots.

In the rematch with Watertown-IHC, Watertown jumped out to an early 3-0 lead in the first period. Both teams scored a goal in the second period and then Watertown-IHC scored again in the third period and held Fulton scoreless to win 5-1.

Leading the way for Fulton was Seth DeLisle with a goal assisted by Trae Sheldon. Goalie Brandon Ladd is credited with 31 saves.

In the Syracuse game, the Red Raiders trailed 1-0 after the first period. In the second, both teams scored one goal as Syracuse took a 2-1 lead into intermission.

Syracuse pulled away during the third period, outscoring Fulton by 3 goals to secure a 5-1 win.

The Red Raiders were led by Seth Cooney with one goal. Eric Forderkonz and Kris Grow had an assist each. Goalies Brandon Ladd and Landon VanAlstine combined to save 40 shots.

Victoria Litwak, longtime hairdresser

Victoria Litwak, 94, of Fulton, passed away Sunday Feb. 9 at her son’s home in Rochester.

Victoria was a life resident of the Fulton area and was a hairdresser for many years.

She was a communicant of St. Michael’s Church in Fulton and enjoyed traveling and gardening.

Victoria was predeceased by her husband, Louis in 1989 and son, Charles in 1981 and siblings, Charles and Ganina.

She is survived by her sons, Daniel (Linda) Litwak and Edwin (Donna) Litwak all of Rochester; two brothers, Ed and Al; five grandchildren; three great-grandchildren.

Calling hours are 12 to 2 p.m. Saturday (today) with a funeral service to immediately follow.

Contributions may be made to Visiting Nurse Service Foundation, 2180 Empire Blvd., Webster, 14580.

Joyce Louise Kenny, fan of Syracuse Chiefs and NY Mets

Joyce Louise Kenny, 72, of Granby, entered into eternal life on Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2014 after a long illness.

She was born Aug. 4, 1941 in Fulton, a daughter to the late Samuel and Katherine Kenny and lived all her life in the Fulton area.

Joyce graduated from Hannibal High School and worked at the Sealright Company, which became Huhtamaki, and retired from there after 44 years of service.

She was a fan of the Syracuse Chiefs and New York Mets. Joyce was an avid bowler and won many trophies.

In addition to her parents, Joyce was predeceased by a brother, Samuel Clark Kenny, Jr.

She is survived by several cousins, close friends and by her beloved cat, Chloe, who shared her life and was greatly loved.

There are no calling hours. Graveside services will be in the spring at a date and time to be announced at Mount Adnah Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, contributions in memory of Ms. Kenny may be made to the Oswego County SPCA-OCAWL, P.O. Box 442, Fulton, NY 13069.

Foster Funeral Home, Fulton has care of arrangements.

Mary Ann Cavallaro, babysitter, baker

Mary Ann Cavallaro, 94, of Fulton, passed away peacefully Monday feb. 10 at her son’s home in Syracuse.

She was born in Fulton, NY June 7, 1919, the daughter of the late Salvatore and Santa Cutuli. She and her husband Morris were married Dec. 12, 1942 in Fulton, where they lived and raised their family.

Mary worked for a short time at the Fulton Woolen Mill and in New York City during World War II. As a homemaker, she babysat for the children of several families and sold homemade baked goods. She was a wonderful wife, mother and grandmother who loved being in the midst of her family.

Mary’s door was always open for company who would gather around the dining room table for delicious food, coffee and conversation.

She was a longtime member of Holy Family Church in Fulton.

Mary was predeceased by her husband of 43 years, Morris, in 1985, and by her sisters Ida Greco and Lucy Greco.

Mary is survived by her son, Maurice, of Syracuse; daughter, Linda (Gerald H) Brown of Oswego; grandsons Gregory and Christopher; sister Ann Louise of Syracuse; step granddaughters Bethany VanBuren, Renee Mulkerin, Cindy Lockler; seven step great grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.

Funeral services will be at 9:30 a.m. Saturday Feb. 15, 2014 in Holy Trinity Church, Fulton.

Calling hours will be 4 to 6 p.m. Friday Feb. 14 at the Sugar Funeral Home 224 W. Second St. S. Fulton.

Spring burial will be in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Fulton.

Florence Rogers, worked at A.L. Lee Hospital

Florence L. Rogers, 86, of Fulton died Tuesday Feb. 11 at Pontiac Nursing Home, Oswego.

She was a born to the late Theron and Eva (Chapman) Clemons and she remained a life resident of Fulton.

Mrs. Rogers retired in 1993 from A.L. Lee Memorial Hospital after 20 years of service.

She is survived by her three daughters,  Margeurite (Larry Davis) Tetro of CA, Cheryl “Susie” (Mike) Snyder of Fulton, and Edith (Todd) Burdekin of Fulton; four grandchildren, Christine Tetro, Tina Donaldson, Mike Chrisman, Jamie Burdekin; six great grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.

Funeral services were held Friday at the Sugar Funeral Home, Inc., with Major James Purvis, from the Oswego County Salvation Army, presiding.

Burial will be held in the spring at Mt. Adnah Cemetery, Fulton. Calling hours were Friday prior to the service.

Sugar Funeral Home, Inc., 224 W. Second St. S. Fulton, is in care of the arrangements.

Jerry’s Journal, by Jerry Hogan

The Margaret White I knew in Good Old Fulton High; the Margaret White whose teammates called “Muggsey” — and the Margaret White Beckwith that so many others in our community also got to knew and grew to love, was in that photo in my previous column of the junior class girls’ championship volleyball team that defeated the senior girls the winter of 1951.

Now I want to give the rest of the team their due.

As shown in the picture: Nancy Guilfoyle (deceased); Shirley Hamilton Chalifoux, (deceased); Carmelina Leotta Jones, still living in Fulton; Anne LeVea Grassi, also living here, and Phyllis Mezullo Desgrosielier (deceased).

Also Lena “Lee” Guiffrida Johnson, living in Texas; Margaret White Beckwith (deceased); and, Eleanor Guilfoyle Wilhelmi, living in Florida.

Absent from the picture was Norma Rogers Hokanson who lives in Mississippi and Clara Perwitz Dudley who is deceased.

Now I feel better, and I thank Anne LeVea Grassi for helping me out with it. I knew she had worked on their last class reunion (Class of 1952) and would be a good resource.

She also stirred up a sweet memory when she called Margaret  “Muggsey.”  Ah, yes… Muggsey…Marg Beckwith….such a sweetheart.

(Editor’s note: the caption under the volleyball team photo misidentified ‘Margaret White’ as “Margaret Smith.’ We regret the error)

Well, time and change have a habit of moving us mortals ever onward and Anne and I had a chance to catch up a little on our lives and soon we were on the subject of computers, and I found out that she had taught classes on computer word processing when she worked for General Electric, from which she retired in 1990.

No internet or email then, but word processors were great for typing and recording. You could cut and paste and fix spelling and grammar without whiteout or starting over.

Her students were mostly secretaries, Anne said, and she told her boss at GE that every secretary should learn how to use a computer. (We’ve come a long way since, haven’t we!)

Anne is looking into her family’s genealogy, which she describes as hard work and very intensive even with a computer, but worth it. She and her husband Mike have a grown daughter and a son and three grandchildren. I thank her for her input and nice chat.

Part 3 of North Sixth Street: It was two columns ago when I started this journey about my old neighborhood via a suggestion by a friend, Gerry Garbus. She and I go all the way back to 1953 when we were young mothers and she lived in her grandparents apartment on North Sixth and I lived up over my parents a couple of blocks away on Porter Street.

I must have walked North Sixth Street a thousand times in my young life: to Erie Street school, Fairgrieve Junior High and to the old high school on South Fourth; and to the State Theater and to the Oswego County Telephone Co. to go work.

I guess I was like the postman — neither rain, nor sleet or snow stopped me — I walked everywhere in all kinds of weather — just like most of us young people did back in the day.

Up North Sixth, past Manhattan Avenue, Freemont Street, Seward, Harrison, Ontario, Erie and Seneca I walked, all the way to Oneida Street, which was another major pathway of my childhood and young adulthood to the Dizzy Block, the bank, the post office, the movies, and to dear old Dr. Steinitz office.

It was a very nice, safe, neat and small compact world back then.

On my way I went by View’s grocery store, went over the little bridge over Waterhouse Creek and past Quirk’s Laundry; Keith Baldwin’s house, the Laws family homes, Paul Kitt’s house and Cusak’s printing press (they did my wedding invitations in 1951).

The North Sixth section of the 1950 City Directory is full of familiar names, from which  I’ve picked a few at random: Beginning at Oneida Street and going north to Porter Street: Fitzsimmons;  Boland; Procopio; Coleman; Perry; Davis; Heppell; Salisbury; Salmonson; Allen; Vescio; Patterson; Rudd.

And if you continue up Crow Hill there were the Jennings; Morrisons; Salisberrys; and the Crook and Rice families.

The Shortsleeves lived on Freemont Street. Their cousin Elizabeth Pollock called me recently to see if I knew them.

Yes, I knew Chuckie and Sally Shortsleeve, they were close to my age, but was surprised to learn there were five other, older children: Fred, Elizabeth, Evelyn (Tootie), Flora (Toy), and Neatrice.

Elizabeth Pollock (Mrs. Joe Pollock) was named after Elizabeth Shortsleeve Allen, her mother, and remembers the pretty yard that abutted Seward Street at her grandparents’ and the good times there, but said the house was very tiny and she didn’t know how her grandparents did it with so many children.

All the neighborhood kids got along, she said. Sally and the Ingersol girls were pals and she recalls sliding down the hill with them in the winter to Seward Street.

There was that little building that was Hare’s gas station, where Seward meets North Seventh Street, she said, and Clay Brewer’s family lived on North Seventh.

The Powerses on Freemont were related to the Brewers, she believed, and she remembered the Blodgetts and Truesdales in that neighborhood, too.

I thank Elizabeth for sharing her memories with us. I also need to give a huge thanks to Gerry Garbus for getting us started on this journey of memories, good humor and much laughter.

Gerry lives out on Phinney Road in a house that she and her husband Fred built themselves while they were still young and raising a family. “No mortgage,” she said.

Her three sons, Fred, Mike and Jim have built houses or have lived nearby on that property as well.

Her husband, Fred, who retired from Sealright, is gone now, but Gerry continues to stay active by visiting with family and friends in person or on the phone, and by keeping up with the news.

And, she loves to bake. What does she bake? Stuff to keep in the house for anyone who stops by, she says. Thanks, Gerry, it’s been fun.

Now here’s my caveat: Reader beware! I write for fun. I am not a historian, nor a reporter. I write from memory and from what others want to share. Sometimes I look things up; sometimes I mess things up.

I hope you have fun reading my stuff. Your comments, additions and corrections are always welcome.

You may contact me at 133 Tannery Lane, Fulton, phone 592-7580 or email JHogan808@aol.com.

Hodgepodge, by Roy Hodge

Last week we observed a big day in the sports world – at least in the American sports world.

The Super Bowl was in town – in every town in the U.S.A. Personally, I am not always a front row fan of professional football. I consider myself an avid Syracuse University sports fan and like most Syracuse-area sports fans, I cheer loudly for them.

I don’t have a lot of interest in what happens in the country’s professional football arenas. I do keep in touch with the pro teams that include former SU players on their rosters – and I have a favorite NFL team.

Brown is a favorite color

I consider myself a follower and fan of the Cleveland Browns. My association with the Browns goes back to when I played street football with my friends, the Fero boys, on Wiman Avenue.

Their father always cheered for the Browns, so the boys were Browns fans, too.

By some kind of logic, I guess that left to me the responsibility among Wiman Avenue kids to support the New York Giants. So, when we lined up on the street in front of our homes, we were the “Browns” and the “Giants.”

The Cleveland Browns were among the winningest teams in those years, when some of their best players included Otto Graham, who led the Browns to 10 championship games and was considered by some to be the best NFL quarterback ever; Lou Groza, an outstanding member of the Browns’ front line for many years; running back Marion Motley; and pass catcher Dante Lavelli.

My personal loyalty to the Browns goes back to the Jim Brown days. When Jim Brown graduated from SU and was drafted by the Cleveland Browns, I became a Browns fan.

(This could become really complicated for you to follow if I told you that in addition to Jim Brown, John Brown, another SU player of that era, also played for the Cleveland Browns and that the Cleveland team was organized by, coached by, and was named after Paul Brown).

That loyalty has been passed on to my oldest son, Craig and his children. Craig and my grandson, Cam, travel to Cleveland at least once a year to attend a Browns game. I have joined Craig in Cleveland and in Buffalo for Browns’ games.

My granddaughter Courtney and her husband, Chris, are Browns fans, and in one of the pictures I have received of great-grand Colton, he is decked out in a Browns jersey.

I have a couple of Browns shirts, and somewhere in my dresser I have a Browns “crying towel,” which is appropriate for current fans of my favorite team.

And, yes, it’s true – the Cleveland Browns, along with three other NFL teams – have never been to the Super Bowl.

Clickety-clack

For Your Information:

Edward R. Murrow typed on a ’46 Royal Quiet Deluxe; Richard Nixon’s typewriter was an L.C. Smith.

Roy Rogers, in a 1950s publicity shot, was typing on a Remington Noiseless Standard, early 40s. It was black and shiny, with Bakelite keys and a spool crank.

In a 1962 photo, Abigail Van Buren (Dear Abby) was typing on an IBM Model B Electric. Dwight Eisenhower’s typewriter was a Royal Futura.

Walter Cronkite favored a Smith Corona ‘60s/’70s Electric Portable, and Bing Crosby had a Royal Portable (1920s).

Agatha Christie did some of her typing on a Remington Portable No. 2, and Truman Capote’s fingers pushed the keys on a Royal, Model HH.

Will Rogers was known to own a Remington Portable #3; Bette Davis used a Remington Noiseless Portable, while Joe DiMaggio typed on a flat-top maroon Corona Sterling.

I didn’t make it through the whole list of typists and their typewriters, but I didn’t find anyone listed as using an “L.C. Smith Silent,” manufactured by L.C. Smith & Corona Typewriter, Inc.

I have written about my faithful old typewriter friend and companion in this space before. Silent, but strong, L.C. guided me through many tense typing moments before his well-deserved retirement several years ago.

I should mention another high-standing relic from the same era as old “Smithy.”  A venerable Underwood typewriter stands watch on a desk top at the bottom of the basement steps.

A key is missing

When looking at old typewriters, if it is old enough – as my old L.C. Smith Silent surely is – you will notice that the key for number one is missing. It’s not because someone took it out, and it’s not because it is broken.

Here’s the explanation:

“The number one key was not implemented by design. Instead, the L key – l in lower case, was used in its lower case form as a letter or a number, because a lower case 1 looks like a one.

That allowed manufacturers to save some space in the overcrowded area where hammers were located.”

Now you know, and you won’t lose any more sleep wondering about it.

Wow!

What a fantastic SU win last Saturday – giving the team a 21-0 undefeated record.  Keep going Orange!

                                      . . . Roy Hodge   

Editor’s note: The Orangemen beat Notre Dame Monday, taking their record to 22-0. They take on Clemson Sunday, Feb. 9.