Category Archives: Fulton News

County health department clinic schedule for the week of Feb. 24

Submitted by Oswego County

The Oswego County Health Department has scheduled a number of health clinics for the week of Feb. 24.

They are:

Walk-in influenza clinics are held weekdays from 9 to 11 a.m. and 1 to 3 p.m. at the Nick Sterio Public Health Clinic, 70 Bunner St., Oswego for people age 19 and older. No appointment is needed; walk-ins are welcome.

Children’s flu vaccine is now available every Tuesday from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. in Oswego, and the third Tuesday of every month from 9 to 11 a.m. at the H. Douglas Barclay Courthouse, Pulaski.

The children’s flu vaccine is available at no cost to all children who qualify for the Vaccines for Children Program provided by the New York State Department of Health. For those who do not qualify, the cost is $37 for the inactivated vaccine.

Patients with private insurance, Managed Medicaid, Managed Medicare, Medicaid, Medicare, and Medicare Part B should bring their benefit cards with them to the immunization clinic.  No one will be turned away due to inability to pay.

The following services will be offered the week of Feb. 24 at the Nick Sterio Public Health Clinic, 70 Bunner St., Oswego.

OSWEGO:

** Adult Influenza Clinic: Monday through Friday, 9 to 11 a.m. and 1 to 3 p.m., walk-in clinic.

** Immunization Clinic: Tuesday, Feb. 25, 12:30 to 3:30 p.m., walk-in clinic.

** Pregnancy Testing: Free pregnancy testing is available. Call 349-3391 to schedule an appointment.

** Sexually Transmitted Disease Testing and Treatment Services: Call 349-3547 to schedule an appointment.

** HIV Counseling and Testing Service:  Call 349-3547 to schedule an appointment

Immunization clinics are held every Tuesday from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. at 70 Bunner St, Oswego, and the third Tuesday of every month from 9 to 11 a.m. at the H. Douglas Barclay Courthouse, Pulaski.

For more information about public health services, contact the Oswego County Health Department, weekdays at 349-3547 or (800) 596-3200, ext. 3547.

Porky and Buddy discuss canine parvovirus

Dear Porky & Buddy,

My next door neighbor came home with a new puppy a few weeks ago that she had gotten from a “free to good home” ad.

I use the word “free” advisedly because a week after the puppy arrived he was at the veterinary hospital with parvo and almost didn’t make it. Now $2,300 later, he is home and I guess OK, but should I be worried?

My kids were playing with him and I have my own (fully vaccinated) dog.

 

Ben

 

Dear Ben,

Ah, the horrors of “free to good home” adoptions.

Many humane societies and rescue organizations are happy to take unwanted  litters of puppies, keep them isolated until their health status can be verified, and then find them good safe homes.

That puppy was lucky that he ended up with someone who could afford the care he needed.

Canine parvovirus is a highly contagious viral disease that can be life-threatening, especially for puppies. It can be transmitted by any person, animal or object that comes in contact with an infected dog’s feces.

The virus can live in the environment for months, and may survive on inanimate objects such as food bowls, shoes, clothes, carpet and floors.

Because of this, you will want to take extra care if the puppy was in your house or yard. Some things are easier to clean and disinfect than others — and even with excellent cleaning, parvovirus can be difficult to eradicate.

Parvo is resistant to many typical disinfectants. A solution of one part bleach to 32 parts water can be used where organic material is not present. The infected dog’s toys, food dish and water bowl should be properly cleaned and then disinfected with this solution for 10 minutes.

If not disinfected, these articles should be discarded. You can also use the solution on the soles of your shoes if you think you’ve walked through an infected area. Areas that are harder to clean (grassy areas, carpeting and wood, for example) may need to be sprayed with disinfectant, or even resurfaced if there is any chance that a susceptible dog will be in that area.

The general symptoms of parvo are lethargy, severe vomiting, loss of appetite and bloody, foul-smelling diarrhea that can lead to life-threatening dehydration.

Puppies, adolescent dogs and canines who are not vaccinated are most susceptible to the virus. (Thank goodness, it cannot be transmitted to people.)

But if you ever notice your dog experiencing severe vomiting, loss of appetite, depression or bloody diarrhea, contact your veterinarian immediately.

Even if your dog is protected from parvo, those are serious symptoms.

The most important thing for pet owners to remember is that you can protect your dog from this potential killer by making sure he’s up-to-date on his vaccinations, and because you have done that you should be OK.

Parvovirus should be considered a core vaccine for all puppies and adult dogs. Consult with your veterinarian about how often your dog will need to be revaccinated.

As your friend found out the hard way, dogs infected with parvovirus need intensive treatment in a veterinary hospital, where they receive antibiotics, drugs to control the vomiting, intravenous fluids and other supportive therapies.

This can result in  considerable expense — the average hospital stay is about 5-7 days. Sadly, treatment is not only expensive, it is not always successful — so it’s especially important for everyone to make sure their dogs are vaccinated.

For a safe adoption, see the Oswego County Humane Society’ pets online at www.oswegohumane.org.

The Oswego County Humane Society provides spay/neuter services and assistance, fostering and adoption of animals in urgent need, humane education programs, and information and referrals to animal lovers throughout Oswego County.

Our office is located at 265 W. First St., Oswego. Phone is 207-1070. Email is ochscontact@hotmail.com  Check out our website at www.oswegohumane.org

Fulton YMCA Speed Demons take on Norwich and Oneonta

The Fulton YMCA Speed Demons recently competed against Norwich and Oneonta.

Speed Demon swimmers continue to work hard in the pool and had many first-place finishes against Norwich.

Grace Trepasso and Mallory Curtis were two of five Fulton swimmers competing in the 20-lap 500 Free event, both taking time off their previous marks and finishing first in their class.

Alisa Trudell had the biggest drop in the meet, crushing her best time in the 200 Free by 32 seconds and also improving in her 100 Free and 100 Back.

Ella Henderson grabbed first in the 200 Free and 50 Fly while Dawson Curtis brought home top honors in the 50 Breast.

Teammates achieving personal best swim times against Norwich were:

Kendall Williamson (50 Free)

Cameron Warren (100 Free, 50 Back)

David Tallents (50 Free, 100 Free)

Hayden Williamson (200 IM, 50 Back, 50 Breast)

Against Oneonta, Fulton showed strength in the Individual Medley (IM) at all levels.

Some first-place honors were won by Lane Rawls, Alisa Trudell, Airyona Croci and Christina Tallents.

Kaitlyn Trudell took an impressive 10 seconds off her 200 IM time. Dakota Stoutenger improved his 200 Free, finishing first.

Luvlee Croci showed the 50 Fly is her strength, finishing first. In the 20-lap 500 Free, Sage Hourihan displayed endurance, finishing under the 7-minute mark by shaving off an astounding 35 seconds.

Brooke Halstead swam personal best times in her 100 Free and 100 Back as did Emily Grant in her three events (100 IM, 100 Free, 50 Breast).

Bodley Bulletins, by Julia Ludington

I hope everyone is enjoying their week off from school.

The Student Senate, FBLA, French Club and Hope Club have all decided to extend the deadline for canned goods collection to Feb. 28.

If you have not already brought in any non-perishable items, or if you would like to bring in more, please plan to when we get back to school. It is for a great cause.

Some teachers are offering incentives for bringing in cans, so make sure to participate. Don’t forget that the Guided Study Hall that collects the most will win a breakfast.

Our FBLA team had a very successful competition recently. The club brought home 12 awards in total. Two first-place awards were won by two of our exchange students, and two other Bodley students also brought home first-place awards.

Our FBLA club always does very well, and we are very proud. Some students even make it to state and national-level competitions. Best of luck for the rest of the year to our fellow GRB students!

On Valentine’s Day, students enjoyed a bit of fun sponsored by the German Club. Students could purchase notes for that special someone or friends and have them delivered to their guided study halls on Friday. The event created a nice atmosphere for the holiday even at the high school.

Students who have signed up for the GRB mentor program should report to their second session Feb. 25.

See you all back at school next week!

Zoo to You brings hands-on experiences to Lanigan Elementary

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

Zoo to You visited Lanigan Elementary School in Fulton recently to present an educational program and deliver adoption certificates.

Each fourth-grade class adopted an animal from the Rosamond Gifford Zoo. The money was raised from a math-fact-a-thon held earlier in the year during which students studied multiplication facts and collected pledges.

The animals adopted by Lanigan students included a Red Panda, Reticulated Python, Bald Eagle and Snow Leopard.

There are two bald eagles and four snow leopards at the Syracuse zoo.

As a token of the zoos appreciation, each of the four classes received a gift bag filled with fact sheets, adoption certificates, colored photos and a stuffed animal.

Students will take turns bringing the plush animal home with them. Their adventures will be recorded in a traveling journal.

Zoo to You’s goal is to increase awareness of the animal kingdom and encourage students to be environmentally conscious. Each program includes live animals such as birds, reptiles and invertebrates.

Professional Zoo Educator Ashley brought along a Ball Python, Chilean rose hair tarantula and a screech owl.

Students were able to pet Namari the python, and feel how its skin is smooth, not slimy. Namari eats a meal of two dead mice once weekly. He smells with his forked tongue and swallows its prey by unhooking its jaw.

Gerty the tarantula was kept safe in a plastic enclosure. Her job is to eat bugs, and the zoo mimics the diet she would have in the wild.

The Eastern screech owl Pigwidgeon was born in Cato, and was tragically involved in a car accident. Pigwidgeon was blinded in one eye, and experienced some brain damage. For this reason, Pigwidgeon is kept safe behind the scenes at the zoo, and makes frequent classroom visits.

Students learned screech owls live in Central New York. They can be found wherever trees are, and camouflage themselves during the day. The bird of prey is nocturnal, and catches food with its feet.

The fourth-graders also were given a quick math lesson that just so happened to fit into their unit on fractions.

Pigwidegeon can turn his head 270 degrees, or three-fourths around. Humans can only rotate their heads 180 degrees.

 

Anthony Miller, enjoyed music and spending time with family, friends

Anthony Miller, 46, of Phoenix, NY, died tragically Monday, Feb. 3 at his Phoenix home.

Mr. Miller was born in Syracuse, NY and he previously lived in Tennessee before returning to Phoenix, NY.

He enjoyed listening to music and spending time with his amazing friends and loving family.

Mr. Miller is survived by his four siblings, Fred Miller, Jr., Ed Miller, Thomas Miller and Lulia Brown; two step-siblings Marion Brosteck and Gerald Kimball;  and several nieces and nephews.

Funeral services were held Tuesday Feb. 18 at the Sugar Funeral Home, Inc., with the Rev. Peter Williams officiating.

Burial will be held privately. Calling hours also were Tuesday in the Sugar Funeral Home, Inc., 224 W. Second St. S. Fulton.

George H. Woods, carpenter, Vietnam veteran

George H. Woods, 67, of Fulton, died Wednesday Feb. 12 in Oswego Hospital, Oswego.

Mr. Woods was a lifetime resident of Fulton. He was a United States veteran having served during the Vietnam War in the Air Force.

Mr. Woods retired from the Oswego Carpenter’s Union Local #747 after several years of service.  He was a past member of the Pathfinder Rod and Gun Club and the Hannibal American Legion Post #1552.

Mr. Woods was pre-deceased by his first wife Anne C. Woods in 1981, and second wife Sylvia Woods in 1993.

He is survived by his longtime companion of more than 20 years Virginia Richardson-Faehl; step-son Gary Nichols; sister Kay (Jack) Farley of AZ; granddaughter Brandi (Len) Keener; and 2 great grandchildren Peyton, Collin Keener and several nieces and nephews.

Funeral service was Saturday in the Sugar Funeral Home, Inc., 224 W. Second St. S. Fulton, with the Rev. Moritz Fuchs.

Burial was held privately Monday in St. Peter’s Cemetery, Oswego. Calling hours were Saturday at the Sugar Funeral Home, Inc.

Big changes in store for Oswego County BOCES CTE program

By Ashley M. Casey

With a $35 million renovation of the Oswego County BOCES complex on the agenda for this summer and some new programs on the way, the Career and Technical Education branch of BOCES is undergoing some big changes for the 2014-15 school year.

CTE Principal Marla Berlin, who took the helm in September 2013, presented an update on the programs’ progress at the Feb. 11 Fulton Board of Education meeting. This academic year, 123 of the county’s 704 CTE students come from the Fulton district.

Berlin, who previously taught business at Mexico High School, said CTE is introducing a STEM academy, two business education programs and “Career Connections,” an effort aimed at disengaged 10th graders.

Career Connections is a half-day exploratory career program that lets 10th graders who are in danger of dropping out of high school experience the various programs CTE has to offer. Berlin said the program’s goal is to “try to hook them into learning” and “bring back that joy of learning.” Although enrollment numbers are not yet final, Berlin said she expects up to 40 students to participate.

Next year, CTE will also eliminate the Floral Design and Greenhouse Technology programs.

“It really was not self-sustaining and not supported by local labor markets,” Berlin told the Fulton school board.

Berlin told The Valley News that current 11th-graders in those programs can continue in different CTE programs next year. She said one student who is interested in opening a floral shop one day may take the new business program, and another botany-minded student may continue in the new STEM academy.

The STEM academy will use scientific inquiry to solve real world problems. Berlin said BOCES has acquired 3-D printers for use in the digital media, STEM and motor sports fabrication programs. Students are using the 3-D printers to design and create objects. She said one of BOCES’ non-3-D printers has a broken component that is no longer made by the printer’s manufacturer.

“Our students are working with CAD and 3-D printers to design … and replicate that part,” Berlin said.

She said BOCES is also looking into buying a 3-D printer that uses chocolate and hard candy for the culinary arts students to create their own confections.

“The kids here think out of the box,” Berlin said. She recalled one student who suggested that BOCES build a mini-fire station for CTE public safety students to practice. “It says a lot about the innovative and creative thinking that kids are inspired to do while they’re here.”

CTE’s programs align with New York state’s new Common Core Learning Standards, which have an emphasis on hands-on, project-based learning and real-world application.

“That’s how they learn, that’s what excites them, and that’s what keeps them in school so they graduate,” Berlin said.

Students in CTE programs are held to industry standards and participate in internships with local companies.

“The success of our internship placement really depends on community support,” Berlin said. “We have excellent rapport (and we’re) making sure our students are knowledgeable, prepared and appropriate for those placements.”

CTE works with Oswego County and the state Department of Labor to keep a finger on the pulse of the county’s job market and place students in fields in which they can find jobs upon graduation.

“It’s not just about placing students just to place them somewhere,” Berlin said. “We truly want to help them move forward in their career path.”

Recently, Oswego’s CTE students won 32 awards in the regional SkillsUSA competition at Morrisville State College. Oswego took the top three spots in collision repair. Many students will go on to the state conference in April at the New York State Fairgrounds in Syracuse.

Despite the whirlwind five months of hard work her new position has brought, Berlin said it has been rewarding.

“It’s all about the kids, watching them learn and their experiences the instructors give them,” she said. “Whenever I get bogged down with paperwork, I walk through the programs. That just makes me smile. They’re looking at their future.”