Category Archives: Fulton News

Hodgepodge, by Roy Hodge

Grandma’s House

Our house was one block from my grandparents’ house when I was growing up, so it seems like I split my time almost evenly between home and Grandma’s.

I knew every inch of Grandma’s house frontwards and backwards. When my brother and sister were with me at Grandma’s, we played “hide and seek” and I always had a favorite hiding place – and I don’t think that the other “hiders” and “seekers” ever discovered it.

My hiding place was inside Grandma’s “broom closet,” a narrow closet which, when the door was shut, looked like it was just another cupboard in the kitchen, filled with bottles, jars and boxes on shelves; but, as far as I was concerned, it was a neat place to hide among the brooms and dust mops.

One of my favorite spots in Grandma’s house was in the “cellar,” a place called the “coal bin.” Many older homes, including ours, as well as my grandparents’, included a space in the basement which in the not so distant past was used to store the coal which was shoveled into the nearby furnace several times each day.

When the coal bin wasn’t needed any longer to store coal it became a convenient little play space.

Another interesting place in the cellar was the nook, or was it a cranny, properly known as the fruit cellar. That little room had several shelves to store the fruits and vegetables that were put there during canning season, but was more useful to us kids as another hiding place.

Two floors and several stairs away, there was another part of my grandparents’ house which was a neat place for us kids to play in.

The attic was cleverly disguised as a closet in one of the  upstairs bedrooms, which made it a handy play room or hiding place.

And, don’t forget the cellar door.  While the cellars (or basements) of most houses were accessible by doors from inside the house there also were doors from outside the house at ground level, which lifted up to reveal stairs going down from the backyard into the house.

Those steps were necessary for grandmas and mothers to have a direct route to the clothesline in the backyard on laundry day, and, they provided another good place to hide.

Grandma’s house – it was such a great place for playing and hiding in the “good old days.”

Bargains – 1901 Style

I have been looking through some pre-Christmas issues of The Fulton Patriot from December 1901.

According to the paper’s front page, 1901 was the 65th year of publishing for The Patriot. The particular issue I was reading was the 50th of the year and was published for and distributed to Fulton and Oswego Falls, the village which occupied the west side of the bridges, across the river from Fulton.

The front page of that issue included a large picture of Santa Claus visiting and distributing gifts to two little girls on Christmas Eve.

Filling the rest of the page – the columns around and under the large photo – was an advertisement for  the J. L. Jones Store, 30 First St.,, Fulton.  The advertising was headlined “Jones’ Bulletin for Christmas” and “Our Goods Are Just As We Say They Are.”

Among items advertised were jewelry – bracelets from 15 cents to $2.50, and brooches and stick pins, from 29 cents to $3.00.

There also were sterling novelties – toothbrushes, nail files, etc.; leather goods – ladies card cases and purses, files, etc.; leather goods – ladies card cases and purses, and men’s wallets and card cases, 25 cents to $5.

Also advertised were men’s hosiery, handkerchiefs for ladies and men, gloves, neckwear, umbrellas and a full boys’ department.

Other advertisers in the Christmas issue included R. E. Phillips Drug Store, 5 S. First St., Fulton, which featured “All Nice, New, Clean Goods;” the Miller and Bogardus Grocery and Provisions Supply House, 108 Oneida St.,; and the Frank W. Lasher Store, on First Street, Fulton. They carried books and games for boys and girls, mechanical toys, fancy china and many other “Holiday Gifts.”

A Busy City

Also during that time, the city seemed to be alive with a full schedule of social events with the Maccabees, Fulton Tent, the Knights of Pythias, the Sons of Veterans, G.A.R., American Mechanics Lodge, the Lodge of Modern Woodmen, and the Grange planning events.

Lots going on, but remember, there was no television.

In the news department, the new Fulton-Oswego Falls Bridge across the Oswego River had recently been completed at a cost of $120,000.

As far as insightful information, the pages of that issue of The Fulton Patriot offered . . . “A Christmas Fact” – The future has a golden tinge; the past, too, may seem pleasant; But just about the Christmastide, There’s nothing like the present.”

Or, this . . . “Origin of Mince Pie – English plum pudding and mince pies both owe their origin, or are supposed to, to an occurrence attendant upon the birth of Christ.

“The highly seasoned ingredients refer to the offering of spices, frankincense and myrrh by the wise men of the East to the Christ Child.” – New York World.

It was a Merry Christmas, 1901 style.

. . . Roy Hodge

Henry James Bonnie, avid outdoorsman

Henry James Bonnie, 72, of Fulton, passed away Sunday Feb. 16 at Oswego Hospital.

Hank was a life time resident of the Fulton area. He had retired from the City of Fulton and had also worked at Battle Island Golf Course.

He was a member of Mt. Pleasant United Methodist Church and was an avid outdoorsman.

He was predeceased by his parents, Francis and Eva Bonnie and siblings, Francis “Butch” Bonnie and Jeanette Cocopoti.

Hank is survived by his wife of 53 years, the former Betsy Miller; children, Kimberly Jo (Rodger) Wooding, Bonnie Bea (Mark) Bonnie-Billion, Henry Jay Bonnie and Billijo Lee (Todd) Blair; sisters, Keitha and Dorothy; 10 grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; several nieces and nephews.

A memorial service will be 11 a.m. Saturday Feb. 22 (today) at Mt. Pleasant United Methodist Church, 2819 County Route 45, Fulton.

Contributions may be made to Mt. Pleasant United Methodist Church Fund, 2996 County Route 45, Fulton, NY 13069.

Hector Rivera, longtime Fulton resident

Hector Rivera, 60, of Fulton, died Sunday Feb. 16, 2014, in St. Joseph Hospital after a short illness.

He was born in Puerto Rico, the son of Alejandro Rivera of Brooklyn and the late Victoria Rivera. He has been a resident of Fulton for many years.

He is survived by his sons Luis Viera and Alex Rivera both of Fulton; his brother Charlie Rivera of Brooklyn; his sister Yolanda Rivera of Fulton; and five grandchildren.

Calling hours were Thursday, Feb. 20, at the Sugar Funeral Home 224 W. Second St. S., Fulton.

Fulton girls’ hoops win first playoff game

By Rob Tetro

The Fulton girls’ varsity basketball team lost 3 out of its last 4 games to conclude the regular season with a 6-12 overall record.

The Lady Raiders qualified or the postseason and won its opening round of Section 3 playoffs by topping Homer Feb. 14 by a score of 37-33.

Fulton ended the season with losses to Skaneateles 47-34, Christian Brother academy 47-36 and East Syracuse Minoa 50-36. Fulton knocked off county foe Mexico 65-45 in one of its last games of the season.

In the Skaneateles game, Fulton had a 1-point lead in the first quarter, but the team was quickly overtaken by Skaneateles in the second. The Lakers had a 27-19 lead at the half.

Skaneateles added to its lead during the third quarter, outscoring Fulton by 5 points. And the Lady Raiders had no answers for the Lakers offense in the fourth quarter as Skaneateles came away with a 13-point win.

Leading the way for Fulton was Michaela Whiteman with 12 points, followed by Nicole Hansen with 8 and Courtney Parker and Kara Bricker with 4 points each.

After a competitive first quarter in the Mexico contest, the Tigers had a 4-point lead over Fulton. But the Lady Raiders quickly began to cut into the deficit and Mexico led at the half by only 1 point.

Fulton stormed ahead during the third quarter, outscoring Mexico by 9 points and then put the game out of reach in the fourth by outscoring Mexico by another 12 points.

Mexico was led by Kendra Harter with 14 points, followed by Sabrina Adams and Baily Wills with 8 points each, Amylyn Holland had 7 and Shelby Buffham and Emily Blunt combined to score 8 points.

Leading the way for the Lady Raiders was Nicole Hansen with 27 points and 15 rebounds. Following Hansen was Sydney Gilmore with 17 points, Michaela Whiteman with 12 and Mallory Clark added 5.

In a tight game with CBA, the Lady Raiders were trailing by 8 in the first quarter, but then stayed with CBA in the second, with both teams scoring 10 points.

CBA had a 28-20 halftime lead.

In the third quarter, both teams again scored 10 points as Christian Brothers Academy maintained its 8-point advantage. Christian Brothers Academy capped off a solid effort during the fourth quarter, outscoring Fulton by 3 points to come away with a 47-36 win.

The Lady Raiders were led by Nicole Hansen with 10 points, followed by Sydney Gilmore with 9 and Mallory Clark scored 7.

In the regular season finale, ESM jumped out to a 9-point lead over Fulton in the first quarter and then poured on 12 more points to have a 28-7 halftime lead.

Fulton proved to be more competitive during the second half, outscoring ESM in the third to cut into the Spartans lead. They outscored East Syracuse-Minoa during the third and fourth quarters to cut into its lead, but the Lady Raiders could not erase the entire lead as ESM won by 14 points.

Leading the way for the Lady Raiders was Nicole Hansen with 18 points, followed by Mallory Clark with 8, Michaela Whiteman with 7 and Sydney Gilmore added 3 points.

In the playoff game against Homer, Fulton built an early lead of 5 point in the first quarter.

But Homer wasted little time battling back. They outscored the Lady Raiders by 4 points but still trailed at halftime, 18-17.

Fulton added to its lead following a competitive third quarter, outscoring Homer to push its lead to 2 points.

The Lady Raiders made the plays they needed down the stretch to secure the win. Fulton outscored Homer by 2 points during the fourth quarter to come away with a 37-33 win.

The Lady Raiders were led by Sydney Gilmore and Michaela Whiteman with 8 points each. Following Gilmore and Whiteman were Mallory Clark and Courtney Parker with 6 points each. Nicole Hansen added 5 points and Hunter Hartranft chipped in 4 points.

Algidio “Archie” Fiorini, former member of Fulton Planning Commission

Algidio “Archie” Fiorini, 79, of Fulton, died Sunday, Feb. 16, 2014, in the Oswego Hospital after a short illness.

Mr. Fiorini was born in Fulton, the son of the late Angelo and Elena (Boccitto) Fiorini. He was sales director for Archway Cookie for many years until his retirement in 1997.

Mr. Fiorini served in the United States Navy from 1952 until 1955. He was board member for the Oswego County Catholic Charities, a member of the City of Fulton Planning Commission, and he was trustee for Holy Family Church, Fulton.

Mr. Fiorini was predeceased by his daughter, Elena Taggart in 2009, and his brother Peter Fiorini.

Mr. Fiorini is survived by his wife of 58 years Bianca Fiorini of Fulton; their children Silvia (Robert) Langdon of Fulton, Daniel (Peggy) Fiorini of Baldwinsville, Steven Fiorini of Fulton, Mark Fiorini of Baldwinsville; son-in-law Peter Taggart of Bainbridge; two brothers Albert (Diane) Fiorini of GA, Anthony (Jill) Fiorini of CA; 10 grandchildren Rachel, Jessica, Erica, Sarah, Nicholas, Dan, Gina, Vanessa, Hannah, Jeremy; and four great grandchildren Leah, Mason, Elaina, and Wynter.

Funeral services were Friday in Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church, Minetto. Burial will be private. There will be no calling hours.

The arrangements are in the care of the Sugar Funeral Home Inc., 224 W. Second St., Fulton.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in Mr. Fiorini’s name to the John Foster Burden Fund, St. Luke Health Services, 299 E. River Road, Oswego.

2 Fulton wrestlers, 4 Mexico wrestlers win Section 3 titles

By Dan Farfaglia

Fulton wrestlers Mitch Woodworth (120 pounds) and Travis Race (160 pounds) earned the right to represent Section 3 at the Division One New York State Public High School Tournament being held at the Times Union Center in Albany this year. 

They are other wrestlers from throughout the area competed Feb. 15 at the Section 3 Division I and II Championships at the SRC Arena at Onondaga Community College.

In his championship match, Woodworth won by a score of 12-2 over previously undefeated Dandre Norman of Rome Free Academy. On his way to the finals, he won by a 10-2 decision over Peter Nash of Liverpool and pinned Dylan Wallace from Central Square.

This is the second sectional title for Woodworth, who has more than 100 wins in his career. He is only a junior and therefore may break some school records by the time he finishes his senior season next year.

In addition to finishing the tournament in first place, Woodworth also received the Division One Tournament`s Most Outstanding Wrestler Award.

Race has been an upper weight varsity standout for two seasons, and he’s only a freshman.

In the finals, he defeated Jerrett Norton of Cicero-North Syracuse 12-8. Earlier in the day he pinned New Hartford`s Tom Zegarelli and defeated Tom Peterson, also of C-NS, 4-3.

Other wrestlers for Fulton who place in the tournament were Joe Abelgore (106 pounds), fourth place, and Collin Flynn (145 pounds), fourth place.

Coming in fifth were Kevin Tucker (113 pounds), Tim Holden (138 pounds), James Bailey (170 pounds), Matt Marshall (220 pounds) and Malachi Manford (285 pounds). Kyle Ware (145 pounds) finished the season in sixth.

Baldwinsville won the Division One Tournament for the second year in a row with 155 points. Liverpool, coached by former Fulton wrestler David Wise, earned second place with 137 points. Fulton came in third with an overall score of 134 points.

In other Division One news, Oswego`s Eric Doviak (285 pounds) and Central Square`s Blake Engebretsen (145 pounds) came in second place at the tournament. Elijah Sampo (220 pounds), also from Central Square, earned third-place honors and his teammates Max Emond (152 pounds) and Phoenix Webb (160 pounds) came in fourth.

Austin Coleman (132 pounds) from Oswego also finished fourth. Ending their seasons in fifth were Jacob Garrow (106 pounds) from Central Square, along with Jordan Attwood (152 pounds) and Austin Piazza (195 pounds) from Oswego.

In Division Two, South Jefferson came in first with 132.5 points and Mexico came in second with 123.5 points. Phoenix finished in sixth with 74 points.

Mexico is sending four wrestlers to the State Tournament in Albany. Winning championship titles were Theo Powers (106 pounds), Austin Whitney (132 pounds), Trevor Allard (160 pounds), and Jacob Woolson (170 pounds). William Hilliard (182 pounds) of Phoenix ended the day in second place.

The New York State Wrestling Tournament will be Feb. 28 and March 1.

Sandra L. House, Salvation Army volunteer

Sandra L. House, 55, of Fulton, died Tuesday evening Feb. 18 at her home after short illness.

She was born in Fulton, the daughter of the late Wesley and Betty (Carr) Thrasher.

Mrs. House was a volunteer at the Salvation Army food pantry. She was a member of the Oswego County Association for the Deaf.

Mrs. House is survived by her husband of 24 years, Leon House of Fulton; son Leon House Jr., of Fulton; five grandchildren; her sister Lori; and brother Wesley.

Calling hours will be Monday Feb. 24 from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Sugar Funeral Home, 224 W. Second St. S. Fulton, NY.

What does Cuomo’s tax rebate plan really mean?

By Debra J. Groom

In his 2014-15 state budget presentation, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said he will provide $1 billion for property tax relief.

At a recent Oswego County Legislature meeting, Oswego County Administrator Philip Church broke down the proposal on what it would mean for Oswego County residents.

In a 13-page analysis, Church said there are many unanswered questions as to how this tax relief will work and how it will be funded.

He said using the county’s tax levies (the amount raised by taxes) for operations, community college and workers compensation, residents with an average Oswego County home valued at $94,500 would receive a rebate of about $16.

And because the tax relief would affect all taxing jurisdictions (county, town, city, village, school districts), the full rebate would be less than $74.

This would be a two-year rebate, Church said.

He believes the state should take the money Cuomo wants for tax relief and instead of one-time rebates, put it toward permanent mandate relief.

This mandate relief would be reducing the cost of programs the state makes the county pay each year. Church said this would help taxpayers by reducing their property tax burden permanently.

“Many counties and the New York State Association of Counties are proposing this alternative method to provide property tax reductions to New Yorkers,” Church wrote in his analysis.

“The alternative consists of the state taking over the costs of four of its own programs: Medicaid, indigent defense, preschool special education and Safety Net,” he said.

Church said if the state paid for these programs, the reductions to the average Oswego County taxpayer’s bill would be about $514.

He also believes if the state pays for the programs itself, it would be forced to reform services.

Other problems with Cuomo’s tax rebate plan, according to Church:

** It is only temporary

** Rebates are reportable as income on federal income tax returns, “diminishing the overall financial benefit,” he writes.

** The cost of implementing the rebate program isn’t known. Church said the state will use tax levy data to compute the rebates and “the bureaucracy needed to collect, record and organize all tax levy date in the state” and then determine each homeowner’s eligibility and tax rebate will be large and a large cost to taxpayers.

** The state is operating now on tax levy data from 2012, stating this is the most recent data the state has. “How will the state be able to calculate rebates on a current year tax levy with any reasonable assurance to taxpayers that is was done accurately and fairly?” he writes.

** For homeowners to receive a rebate in the second year, the county must develop and submit plans to the state by June 2015 concerning consolidation and shared services. The county cannot use in its plan any consolidations or shared services it has already completed. He estimates Oswego County would have to come up with about $7.2 million in savings through its consolidation/shared services plan if all tax jurisdictions in the county participated.

** In order for a municipality to participate in the tax freeze rebate program, it cannot adopt a precautionary waiver of the state’s 2 percent tax cap. Oswego County adopts the waiver each year due to the ongoing tax status negotiations with Entergy for the FitzPatrick nuclear plant in Scriba.

Without the waiver, taxpayers could be left having to come up with millions of dollars in penalties if a tax settlement for Entergy greatly changed previous years county tax levies.

So participating in the tax rebate program would pose a large risk for Oswego County, Church said.

Legislature Minority Leader Michael Kunzwiler, D-Oswego, said he believes  Cuomo’s idea to push for more shared services and consolidation is good, especially as it get more people talking about the issue.

“If this stirs things up, that’s good,” he said.

He disagreed with Church’s emphasis on state mandate relief, stating Church for too long has been singing this same song.

“Phil has to stop pointing the finger and srart looking in the mirror,” Kunzwiler said. “Phil’s top worry is about what the state is doing — instead we should start cleaning up our own house.”