Category Archives: Fulton Families

The monthly series tells the stories of families that have either lived in Fulton for ages or perhaps only a short while — but their common bond is they love the city and wouldn’t want to live anywhere else.

FULTON FAMILIES — Music Men: The Cortini Brothers

All smiles – Kimo and Joe Cortini pose with their mother, Cecilia, in this recent photograph. Cecilia lives in Oswego. Photo courtesy of Joe Cortini
All smiles – Kimo and Joe Cortini pose with their mother, Cecilia, in this recent photograph. Cecilia lives in Oswego. Photo courtesy of Joe Cortini

This is the 10th edition of Fulton Families, a monthly series which tells the stories of families that have either lived in Fulton for ages or perhaps only a short while — but their common bond is they love the city and wouldn’t want to live anywhere else.

By Ashley M. Casey

Fulton is familiar with the Cortini Brothers from head to toe.

Your ears have probably caught their musical stylings at the Fulton Jazz Fest or Tunes in June, and your feet may have stepped into a pair of shoes Joe Cortini has repaired or sold.

The Cortinis have seen Fulton change over the course of more than a century. Although Kimo Cortini moved away three years ago, Joe Cortini and his son still call the city home. Through Cortini Shoe Store and the Cortini Brothers’ band, the family’s ties are still laced to Fulton. Continue reading

Together again – The Hudson family poses in 2012. All four of Henry and Beverly Hudson’s sons still live in Fulton. Their daughter, Holli Bacon, lives in Connecticut. From left to right: Dan, Holli, David, Beverly, Henry, Eric and Doug.

FULTON FAMILIES — A Country Boy Can Survive: The Hudsons

This photo, circa 1968, shows Henry and Beverly Hudson’s five children. Back row: Holli Hudson Bacon, Doug and Eric Hudson; front row: David and Dan Hudson.
This photo, circa 1968, shows Henry and Beverly Hudson’s five children. Back row: Holli Hudson Bacon, Doug and Eric Hudson; front row: David and Dan Hudson.

Editor’s note: This is the ninth installment of stories about Fulton Families. The monthly series tells the stories of families that have either lived in Fulton for ages or perhaps only a short while — but the common bond will be they love the city and wouldn’t want to live anywhere else. If you know of a family we should highlight, please email Ashley M. Casey, Valley News assistant editor, at acasey@scotsmanmediagroup.com.

By Ashley M. Casey  |  Photos courtesy of the Hudson family

“Can’t take the farm out of a country boy.”

That’s what Doug Hudson says about staying close to his roots.

Doug, who owns Hudsons’ Dairy, left Fulton only long enough to go to college. He and his three brothers, Dan, Eric and David, all returned to the city — or, more accurately, just outside it — to be close to their parents and help out on the farm in Granby.

fulton familiesTheir sister, Holli Bacon, is the only one of Henry and Beverly Hudson’s children who moved out of Fulton. She now lives in Wethersfield, Connecticut.

“We’re lucky all the boys are around us,” Beverly says.

Through the Hudsons’ dairy business, community connections and deep roots, it seems that Fulton is lucky to have them around.

Continue reading

FULTON FAMILIES — The whole herd: The Rowlee family’s mark on Fulton

Fulton Dairy Farms began with one cow, shown here with Elon Rowlee at Cannon Hill between North Seventh and North Eighth streets, circa 1919 or 1920. Photo courtesy of Judy Rowlee Howard
Fulton Dairy Farms began with one cow, shown here with Elon Rowlee at Cannon Hill between North Seventh and North Eighth streets, circa 1919 or 1920.
Photo courtesy of Judy Rowlee Howard

Editor’s note: This is the eighth installment of stories about Fulton Families. The monthly series will tell the stories of families that have either lived in Fulton for ages or perhaps only a short while — but the common bond will be they love the city and wouldn’t want to live anywhere else. If you know of a family we should highlight, please email Ashley M. Casey, Valley News assistant editor, at acasey@scotsmanmediagroup.com.

By Ashley M. Casey

It began with a cow.

Elon K. Rowlee and his bride, Gertrude Candee, received the small cow from Elon’s parents as a wedding present in 1917. Four years later, that cow inspired the start of the Fulton Dairy Farms Co., which lasted more than four decades. Continue reading

FULTON FAMILIES – The good earth: The Vescios’ roots go deep in Fulton

Front page – The Vescios gathered for youngest child June’s baptism in November 1934. This photo appeared with a story about the family in The Post-Standard. Photo courtesy of Sam Vescio
Front page – The Vescios gathered for youngest child June’s baptism in November 1934. This photo appeared with a story about the family in The Post-Standard.
Photo courtesy of Sam Vescio

Editor’s note: This is the seventh installment of stories about Fulton Families. The monthly series will tell the stories of families that have either lived in Fulton for ages or perhaps only a short while — but the common bond will be they love the city and wouldn’t want to live anywhere else. If you know of a family we should highlight, please email Debbie Groom, Valley News managing editor, at dgroom@scotsmanmediagroup.com. 

By Ashley M. Casey

“One of Fulton’s Largest Families: Vescio’s 12 Children Range From 5 Months to 18 Years” reads the 1934 Post-Standard clipping’s headline.

Although the story is 80 years old, it’s not unlike headlines found in The Valley News today. Now, the Vescios’ appearance in the local media has come full circle.

Of the 14 children born to Angelo and Rosina Vescio, only 12 lived to adulthood. Today, four of the original Vescio children are alive in Fulton: Joe, Sam, Ellen and June. Sam Vescio, now 87, and his daughter, Rosemary Vescio Pollard, shared their story of what keeps them in the city that their clan has called home for more than a century. Continue reading

FULTON FAMILIES — Labor of love: The Mirabitos celebrate a century in Fulton

The Mirabito family has lived through about a century of ups and downs in Fultons. Today, Jim Mirabito is a successful grocer in Hannibal. Back row, left to right: Ann, Jim and Dan; front row: Sue, Steve and Sara.
The Mirabito family has lived through about a century of ups and downs in Fultons. Today, Jim Mirabito is a successful grocer in Hannibal. Back row, left to right: Ann, Jim and Dan; front row: Sue, Steve and Sara.

Editor’s note: This is the sixth installment of stories about Fulton Families.  The monthly series will tell the stories of families that have either  lived in Fulton for ages or perhaps only a short while — but the common  bond will be they love the city and wouldn’t want to live anywhere else.  If you know of a family we should highlight, please email Debbie Groom,  Valley News managing editor, at dgroom@scotsmanmediagroup.com.

By Ashley M. Casey

According to Charlene Mirabito, six is the perfect number of children.

Having grown up as the only child of Polish immigrants to Fulton, she knew  that one would be lonely. But she thought two would fight, three would end up two-on-one, and four or five might gang up on each other as well. So she and her husband, Francis, settled on six: Ann, Jim, Sue, Dan, Steve and Sara.

Out of that brood of six, only Jim Mirabito remains a Fultonian. He and his wife, Cindy, own the Hannibal Village Market, which they bought from Francis back in 1996.

As a third-generation Mirabito in Fulton, he is carrying on the family tradition of engaging with the community. Continue reading

FULTON FAMILIES: There’s no place like Fulton for the Farfaglias

Isodore and Antonia Farfaglia
Isodore and Antonia Farfaglia

Editor’s note: This is the fifth installment of stories about Fulton Families. The monthly series will tell the stories of families that have either lived in Fulton for ages or perhaps only a short while — but the common bond will be they love the city and wouldn’t want to live anywhere else. If you know of a family we should highlight, please email Debbie Groom, Valley News managing editor, at dgroom@scotsmanmediagroup.com.

 

By Ashley M. Casey  |  Photos courtesy of Dan Farfaglia

Growing up in a large family in Fulton was like a movie for Dan Farfaglia.

“It was the Italian version of ‘My Big Fat Greek Wedding,’” Dan recalled.

Since their arrival in the early 20th century, the Farfaglias have been active in the Fulton community. In addition to serving as a county legislator for Fulton and Granby, Dan is active with the Rotary Club.

His cousin, Jim, is an author who writes the “Poetry Corner” in The Valley News and teaches writing classes. And, of course, the family is well known for its participation in the Fulton Wrestling Club.

Although they are a bit more spread out now, the Farfaglia family has deep roots in, and deep pride for, the city of Fulton. Continue reading

FULTON FAMILIES: A school of fish: The Westons just keep swimming

The favorites – Bob Weston used to tell each of his three daughters — Cindy, Alison and Kelly — that she was his favorite. It wasn’t until later that they found out they were all his favorites.  Photo courtesy of the Weston family
The favorites – Bob Weston used to tell each of his three daughters — Cindy, Alison and Kelly — that she was his favorite. It wasn’t until later that they found out they were all his favorites.
Photo courtesy of the Weston family

Editor’s note: This is the fourth installment of stories about Fulton Families. The monthly series tells the stories of families that have either lived in Fulton for ages or perhaps only a short while — but the common bond is that they love the city and wouldn’t want to live anywhere else. If you know of a family we should highlight, please email Debbie Groom, Valley News managing editor, at dgroom@scotsmanmediagroup.com.

By Ashley M. Casey

It’s well past Christmas, but Bob and Sandy Weston’s tree is still decked out in the living room. It’s not a Christmas tree anymore, though — it’s a celebration tree.

“The bulbs come down (and) we put pictures, we put cards, birthdays, anniversaries, celebrations, any kind of card that we get from friends and from family we put on the tree,” Bob said. Continue reading

FULTON FAMILIES: Fulton will always be home base for the Schremps

Hometown hero – A sign on Route 481 shows Fulton’s pride for professional hockey player Rob Schremp.Photo courtesy of Jerry Schremp
Hometown hero – A sign on Route 481 shows Fulton’s pride for professional hockey player Rob Schremp.
Photo courtesy of Jerry Schremp

Editor’s note: This is the third installment of stories about Fulton Families. The monthly series tells the stories of families that have either lived in Fulton for ages or perhaps only a short while — but the common bond will be they love the city and wouldn’t want to live anywhere else. If you know of a family we should highlight, please email Debbie Groom, Valley News managing editor, at dgroom@scotsmanmediagroup.com.

By Ashley M. Casey

Entering Fulton on Route 481, there is a red, white and green sign — G. Ray Bodley colors — bearing the silhouette of a hockey player. It reads “Welcome to Fulton: Hometown of Rob Schremp, 1st Fultonian in the NHL.”

Rob Schremp’s athletic success is no fluke. The entire Schremp family — and their dozens of relatives — are known throughout Fulton for their involvement in the city’s sports world. This involvement keeps them tied to their community and to each other. Continue reading