Category Archives: Featured Stories

New Volney Elementary principal on the job

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

With the new year also comes a new principal for Volney Elementary School.

Lisa Garofalo has replaced Interim Principal Michael Egan, and brings with her 10 years of administration experience.

Her most recent job was with the Syracuse City School District, where she was a vice principal at the West Side Academy at Blodgett.

She also worked at Seymour Elementary and was an assistant principal at Ed Smith Elementary in Syracuse.

Garofalo holds three certifications, including one in special education. She was a former principal of special education and pre-kindergarten at Herkimer County BOCES and also taught high school math in the Whitesboro School District.

Garofalo said she is thrilled to be principal at a school with such a high reputation.

“The first few days here have been fabulous, I can’t stop smiling,” she said. “I enjoy interacting with the children; I had lunch with a group of fourth grade girls and we had great conversation.”

Garofalo has always wanted to be an elementary principal, and it seemed like the next step in her career.

In her second interview for the position, she found the staff to be so passionate, and wanted to be a part of such a successful school.

“I can tell this will be a good fit because the staff is so dedicated and puts the students first,” she said.

Joining mid-year, Garofalo has had a lot of catching up to do. She recently attended at Parent Teacher Group meeting, where members shared with Garofalo the school’s annual traditions, like the end of the year ice cream social.

She is interested in starting her own traditions in time, but for now, is diligently taking notes and trying to make connections.

“I’ve made it my personal mission to learn the names of every student in the building,” she said.

If a name slips her memory, she asks students to remind her upon each greeting.

“My job (as principal) is all about building relationships and developing an understanding of behaviors, and that starts with knowing the students and my team on a personal level.”

“I want the students to see me as a support, and I want parents to see me as someone that will be there to make their child’s elementary experience positive.”

Garofalo, who commutes from Fayetteville, is looking forward to becoming part of Volney community.

“This is a family oriented building, and I want to find out what is important to the people here,” she said.

Fulton Community Theatre presents ‘2 Across’

February will see a mixture of romance and crosswords played in dinner theatre setting as Fulton Community Theatre presents “2 Across.”

The comedy by Jerry Mayer, which kicks off FCT’s 24th year, will run weekends, Feb. 8, 9, 14, 15, and 16 at Tavern On The Lock, 24 S. First St., Fulton.

The comedy will be presented as a dinner theatre offering, with Friday and Saturday dinners beginning at 6 p.m. with a 7:30 p.m. showtime. On the two Sunday matinees, dinner will begin serving at 2 p.m., with a 3:30 p.m. curtain time.

Tickets for a buffet dinner and show are just $25 for adults, $23 for seniors and students.

Show only tickets are $12 for adults and $10 for students and seniors. Reservations may be made by calling Tavern On The Lock at 592-2661.

The show tells the tale of two strangers, Josh and Janet, who meet on a commuter train. They are alone in the car, both doing the New York Times crossword.

She’s an organized, sensible psychologist. He’s a free spirited, unemployed ad exec. She is a crossword pro, he always quits. They learn from each other, argue, laugh, reveal big problems, they kiss.

But will they meet again?

“2 Across” features the talents of Valerie Roscoe-Dedich as Janet and Donald Crowe as Josh. Both will be familiar faces to Fulton Community Theatre audiences. Valerie was featured in the comedy farce “Bedside Manners,” while Donald appeared last season in “Alone Together” and “Curtain Up On Murder”.

The production is under the direction of Michael A. Bolio.

Jerry Mayer is a veteran writer of stage, movies, and television. His writing credits include several stage plays, as well as writing for television shows such as M*A*S*H, All in the Family, The Bob Newhart Show, and The Mary Tyler Moore Show.

Fulton Community Theatre’s production is a Central New York debut of his comedy.

The play, which is the second Valentine’s Day-themed show for FCT, is also the first dinner theatre venture for the theatre in many years. It was an annual staple for many seasons, and is something that the theatre has been looking at since it resumed active production in 2010.

“We believe that this comedy really fits well in a dinner theatre setting, and we hope our regular patrons will come out for a great night of dinner and entertainment, and that others who haven’t been to our shows before or in a while, will come and join us,” said theatre Artistic Director William Edward White.

For more information, contact the Fulton Community Theatre at its website,, or by emailing

Oswego Music Hall features blues, bluegrass and Americana Feb. 8

The Oswego Music Hall welcomes the always popular Philadelphia-based father and son duo, Beaucoup Blue, plus Carolann Solebello, perhaps most familiar to folk audiences as a founding member of the female trio Red Molly, to the hall at 8 p.m. Feb. 8.

Beaucoup Blue’s David and Adrian Mowry have wowed Oswego Music Hall audiences several times before. From blues to bluegrass, their soulful tradition and contemporary styles mesh into an innovative and authentic sound.

They pretty much cover the full range of “Americana” quite uniquely in their song writing and how they choose to represent classic material.

During their years together as a duo, they have received numerous awards, including “Grand Prize Winner of Billboard Magazine World Song-Writing Contest,” and the “Grand Prize Winner of the Terruride Blues & Brew Acoustic Competition.”  Their two soulful voices and slide guitar virtuosity are simply wonderful to behold in a live performance.

David and Adrian Mowry have been playing at top folk music venues for a long time. Last September, the album “Live at Caffé Lena: Music From America’s Legendary Coffeehouse, 1967 -2013” was released.

This piece of “Folk Music Heaven” includes songs by Beaucoup Blue from its 2008 concert at Lena, along with 60s greats like Pete Seeger and present day singers like Sara Lee Guthrie (Arlo’s daughter).

Carolann Solebello returned to solo performance in August 2010 after six years with the Red Molly band. She toured nationally and recorded three full-length CDs with that trio.

On her own, Carolann has recorded four CDs, including 2013’s Steel and Salt, and is carving out a rich and varied career as a singer-songwriter.

Carolann is the winner of the 2011 Susquehanna Music & Arts Festival Songwriting Competition, and was an Official Showcase Artist at Folk Alliance International and the Northeast Regional Folk Alliance in 2012.

A New York City native, Carolann first fell in love with mountain music – and the bluegrass and country that grew out of that tradition – while working as an actor in East Tennessee and Kansas. Tunes and techniques she learned from musicians in both places fundamentally changed her approach to songwriting and guitar playing, and subsequently colored her work with Red Molly.

The venue is the McCrobie Civic Center, 41 Lake Street, Oswego. Desserts, snacks, popcorn and beverages are available for purchase. Tickets can be purchased online at or at the River’s End bookstore, 19 W. Bridge St., Oswego.  Holders of tickets purchased before 1 p.m. the day of the concert will have preferred seating.  After 1 p.m., seating is general admission. Tickets are $14 if purchased in advance and $16 at the door.   Children 12 and under are half-price; under 5 is free.

The Music Hall’s next concert Feb. 22 will feature  “Percussion Wizard” Jeff Haynes & Co., including guitarist Sean Harkness and singer-songwriter Casey Erdmann.

Oswego Opera Theater presents Rigoletto — The Oswego Story

The Oswego Opera Theater will present Rigoletto – The Oswego Story, Feb. 21 and 23 at SUNY Oswego’s Waterman Theatre in Tyler Hall.

The Feb. 21 performance is at 7:30 p.m. and the Feb. 23 show is at 2 p.m.

In Guiseppe Verdi’s first true masterpiece, Rigoletto, the original setting is Mantua, Italy in the 16th Century, where the main characters are the Duke of Mantua (chauvinist and all-around bad boy), his court jester Rigoletto, the jester’s angelic daughter (way too innocent and naïve), an assassin for hire and his sister.

Rigoletto has been a favorite with audiences all over the world since it first hit the stage in 1851.

Now, reimagined by Oswego Opera Theater Artistic Director Mack Richardson, Rigoletto – The Oswego Story plots Duke, the personally and politically “connected” owner of a Prohibition-era speak-easy in Oswego.

He is a notorious womanizer, and for fun disguises himself as a poor SUNY Oswego student to romance the college girls.

Tickets are $25 for regular price admission, $20 for seniors and faculty/staff of all educational institutions in the region, and $5 for all students. Tickets are available at the SUNY Oswego Box Office at  312-2141 or online at

For more information on the event, sponsor information, and/or the Oswego Opera Theater please call (315) 638-0674 or visit Facebook: Oswego Opera Theater Events;; or email

Hannibal committee continues work on planning school district’s future

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

Hannibal school personnel, community stakeholders, students and parents continued to lay the groundwork for the district’s future during a meeting Jan. 16 night among the Strategic Plan Committee’s three task forces.

Divided into groups targeting student engagement, family/community engagement and academic achievement, the task forces delved into lengthy discussions to help develop a five-year blueprint for Hannibal schools.

Superintendent Donna Fountain said the open discussions and information-sharing sessions have been essential in helping create a solid foundation for the district’s future.

“Both the core team and task forces have made tremendous progress toward developing the five-year plan,” Fountain said. “We are up to date with the original timeline and meeting the goals we have set for each meeting.”

Thursday’s meeting was another step forward in the process, as the roughly two dozen task force members reviewed potential core beliefs for the district.

They zeroed in on areas such as practicing respect, creating a passion for learning, prioritizing students, setting high expectations, communicating effectively, being open to change and encouraging student-driven learning.

Although the core beliefs are still a work in progress, the accomplishments made so far have been impressive, said Penny Ciaburri, chief executive officer of PLC Associates Inc. (the consulting firm contracted to aid the district in developing its strategic plan).

The ideas, goals and concerns shared during the meetings will go a long way in making the Hannibal school system a “destination district” for those seeking a premiere learning environment, she said.

“This group has a very high level of commitment … some of best efforts I have seen and very responsive in doing everything according to protocol,” Ciaburri said. “You guys get it.”

That kind of devotion is critical for the development of a comprehensive plan, Fountain said.

“Community members provide an understanding of how the district is perceived as well as increasing community awareness of our goals and our plans to achieve our goals,” the superintendent said.

“In addition, these individuals help us to understand the needs of the community both in the present and future. We are very cognizant that these individuals lead very busy lives. To devote this much time and energy to the future of our district speaks highly of their commitment to the education of our students as well as the Hannibal community as a whole.”

As the plan begins to take shape, committee members and task force representatives are showing their dedication to the process by getting together outside of regularly scheduled meetings to examine survey results, conduct research and analyze data to compare similar districts and assess Hannibal’s specific needs.

“One of the aspects I am most impressed with is that they are looking at data, collecting best practices and examining relevant research – all before they start planning,” Ciaburri said, noting that their commitment was on display during the Jan. 16 meeting.

“They are able to identify accurate statistics from (staff, student and community) surveys,” Ciaburri said. “They even are pulling data from our State Review. These teams already ‘own’ their work. That is major for implementation.”

Armed with a workbook and a lot of data, the task forces are beginning to develop specific strategic intents for the district. This process will help set benchmarks in particular areas and specify – using quantitative data – the goals for the future when it comes to student engagement, community/family engagement and academic achievement.

“We can choose the kinds of things that will be our targets,” Ciaburri said. “You’re setting a stake in the ground and defining very clearly where we’re going to land.”

The task forces and the core committee will continue to analyze data and develop specific goals and strategies as the process moves forward. And although the development of a five-year plan can be daunting, Ciaburri said she is pleased with how well the groups are working together.

“Everyone should know, under some difficult circumstances, these teams are just pushing through,” she said. “The Hannibal community should be proud of that. It is about our kids and they know it.”

The next core team meeting will be held from 4-6:15 p.m. Jan. 23 in the Hannibal school district boardroom. Two weeks later, from 4-6:15 p.m. Feb. 6, the core team and the three task forces will meet. The committee hopes to complete the plan by March 21 and is expected to present it to the school board during a meeting April 2.

For more information on the process or to become involved, contact internal facilitator Tammy Farrell at or by phone at 564-7900, ext. 3004.

SAM North American opens expanded site in Schroeppel

By Ashley M. Casey

Sung An Machinery’s North American arm — better known as SAM-NA, LLC — has made a new home for itself in the Oswego County Industrial Park in Schroeppel.

Local legislators and business owners attended the center’s ribbon cutting Jan. 21.

The 10,000-square-foot facility houses SAM’s new Extrusion Technology Center and marketing office, which will allow SAM’s North and South American customers to see firsthand how new extrusion and lamination technologies can be applied.

The facility currently employs seven people — mostly engineers — but is projected to hire seven more.

Extrusion coating is a process that binds multiple layers of polymers together to create flexible packaging and other products, such as potato chip bags, juice cartons, disposable diapers and plastic packing tape.

Based in South Korea, SAM has headquarters in Italy and Granby, N.Y. and more than 600 machine installations in 27 countries across the globe.

SAM-NA has had an office in Granby since 2010, which has been a support and service organization for SAM-NA.

“We’re excited about this. It’s a great addition to the Industrial Park,” said L. Michael Treadwell, CEO of the County of Oswego Industrial Development Agency and executive director of Operation Oswego County.

Treadwell said that SAM first contacted IDA about expanding in the summer of 2011.

“They had to sell this project to the parent company in South Korea,” Treadwell said.

Officials from SAM’s Korea headquarters visited the Industrial Park and agreed to purchase and modify the building, which sits on two-and-a-half acres of land. The building previously served as the IDA’s startup “incubator” site.

Andy Christie, managing director of SAM-NA, said that the company made a lot of modifications to the building before moving in, including new power, floors, a furnace and other renovations. Treadwell estimated the investment in the building to be about $2.5 million.

“We’ve made a substantial investment to improve this building, as well as bring in the pilot extrusion and laminating line,” Christie said.

The pilot machine, which is mainly for demonstration and product testing, cost about $2 million. A full-size extrusion machine costs $3.5 million.

“Ninety percent of the (work) was done by Oswego County contractors,” Christie said.

Holly Carpenter, a spokesperson for New York state Sen. Patty Ritchie, said that Sen. Ritchie extended a warm welcome to SAM-NA’s new business site and applauded their support of local contractors.

“Small business is the backbone (of New York state), and we’re so pleased to have you here,” Carpenter said.

“It just gives Oswego County another success story in terms of attracting manufacturing with an internationally known company,” Treadwell said.

Yes, it’s been cold — but we haven’t set any records

By Debra J. Groom

Yes, it’s been cold.

It was bone-chilling a couple of weeks ago and it’s frigid again now.

And while it may seem odd to have this many cold days in a row, this is nothing compared to two years in the past.

That’s it – think back to February 1979, says local weather observer Paul Cardinali, of Fulton.

That month, there was a stretch of 13 days of temperatures less than 0, he said. And in the more than 40 years that he’s been keeping records, Fulton hit its all-time low of minus 26 on Feb. 18, 1979.

“The average temperature in February 1979 was 10.7 degrees,” he said. “Boy, that is cold. That’s the coldest February I’ve ever recorded.”

The same was true over in the Port City of Oswego. Weather observer William Gregway said the mercury plunged to minus 20 there on Feb. 18, 1979.

Now more recently, the Fulton and Oswego areas plunged into a deep freeze in January 2005.

Gregway said Oswego posted temps at 0 or below 0 for eight days between Jan. 18 and 28. Cardinali said Fulton also recorded temperatures at 0 or below for 10 days from Jan 18 through Jan. 31.

“We haven’t experienced the prolonged cold periods lately that I can remember,” Gregway said.

Even the cold from a couple of weeks ago seems a distant memory considering what happened after that cold snap ended.

Cardinali said temperatures were below 0 on Jan. 2, 3 and 4. But then the mercury started to climb.

“It was 52 on Jan. 10 and close to 50 on Jan. 12,” he said.

The Weather Channel forecasted Fulton to see its last minus temp Thursday night. Then temperatures are supposed to go up – slightly – to a raging high of 26 by Saturday (today). Lows still will be a bit nippy in the single digits or low teens.

And The Weather Channel has that trend continuing through next Friday, Jan. 31.

Cardinali said the one thing that made this week more bearable than earlier in January was the wind. During the Jan. 2-4 cold snap, the winds were whipping, making wind chills of minus 25 degrees. This most recent cold was mostly temperature only with very little wind.

Fulton temperatures in January 2005
Jan. 18, minus 3
Jan. 19, minus 1
Jan. 20, minus 2
Jan. 21, minus 13
Jan. 22, minus 17
Jan. 23, minus 11
Jan. 24, minus 11
Jan. 28, minus 14
Jan. 29, minus 1
Jan. 31, 0

Fulton temperatures in February 1979
Feb. 1, 9
Feb. 2, 9
Feb. 3, minus 8
Feb. 4, 9
Feb. 5, 7
Feb. 6, minus 2
Feb. 7, minus 4
Feb. 8, minus 10, Feb. 9, minus 8
Feb. 10, minus 16
Feb. 11, minus 22
Feb. 12, minus 24
Feb. 13, minus 16
Feb. 14, minus 25
Feb. 15, minus 10
Feb. 16, minus 2
Feb. 17, minus 20
Feb. 18, minus 26
Feb. 19, 3
Feb. 20, 0
Feb. 21, 18
Feb. 22, 32
Feb. 23, 30
Feb. 24, 30
Feb. 25, 20
Feb. 26, 20
Feb. 27, 20
Feb. 28, 20

Veit buying Scotsman Press Inc.

Badoud Enterprises, Inc., owned by John J. Badoud, Jr. of Virginia, today announced it has signed a definitive agreement to sell the assets of its sole operating unit, The Scotsman Press, Inc., to its current President, William G. Veit. 

Incorporated in 1954, Scotsman produces award-winning, community-focused publications and serves hundreds of other publications through its commercial printing services to customers throughout Central New York. The sale of the company to Veit will increase Scotsman’s value to its employees, customers, vendors, and other stakeholders, as the company will become an even more integral part of the CNY community and media market now under the direction of local ownership.

With the change of ownership, Veit’s new company will acquire assets including, The Valley News, Today’s CNY Woman, Finger Lakes Vacationer, and other publications, along with plant equipment, vehicles, and the company’s Chenango Bridge facility. The company will continue to do business as The Scotsman Media Group, maintaining all of its operating divisions in Syracuse, Chenango Bridge, and Fulton, New York, and there are no plans to change the company’s workforce of 96 employees as a result of the transition. Improvements to the company’s information technology systems are presently underway to ensure that Scotsman’s outstanding customer service, quality print media, and advertising solutions to the CNY marketplace will continue.

Veit and his wife, Linda, along with their two daughters, are lifelong residents of Syracuse, residing in the Onondaga Hill area. Veit has been employed by the Scotsman Media Group since 1990. He earned his MBA from Le Moyne College;  his wife, Linda, is employed by Upstate Medical University and received her masters in public health from Syracuse University and Upstate.

The transaction is expected to close on March 31, 2014.