Category Archives: Featured Stories

March 1 deadline to apply for agricultural assessment

Oswego County residents who have agricultural land and would like to receive a lower land assessment have until March 1 to file their application.

In 1971, New York state passed the Agricultural District Law, including the Agricultural Assessment Program. This assessment program allows owners of agricultural lands to receive a lower assessment on eligible properties.

During these years of increasing property taxes, this program could save on taxes, making it more affordable to own open, agricultural land.

Owners whose land satisfies the minimum requirements may apply for an agricultural assessment.

The following eligibility requirements must be met:

1) Land must consist of 7 or more acres that is used for the production for sale of crops, livestock, or livestock products

2) The annual gross sales of agricultural products must average $10,000 or more. If an agricultural enterprise consists of less than 7 acres, it may qualify if the annual gross sales equal $50,000 or more.

Additional special stipulations are given to horse boarding operations, aquaculture, orchards and/or vineyard operations.

Land rented for agricultural purposes may receive an agricultural assessment.

To apply for an agricultural assessment in Oswego County, contact your local assessor’s office and obtain the Agricultural Assessment application (form RP-305). You must have one application form for each tax parcel you wish to apply for.

Next, call the Oswego County Soil and Water Conservation District Office at 592-9663 to schedule an appointment. This office will explain to you the next step(s) required in completing the application process.

A charge of $20 per parcel is assessed to complete the Soil Group Worksheet prior to March 2; after the charge is $30.

The completed application with all other required documents must be received at the local assessor’s office by March 1, 2014. Landowners already enrolled should remember to contact their local assessor’s office annually to see if they need to renew their application.

For more information about agricultural assessments, call 592-9663.

State police continue to investigate Granby man’s death

State police are following “several leads” in the death of a Granby man this week.

The body of Anthony Miller, 46, who lived in a mobile home at the Indian Hills Mobile Park on state Route 48 in Granby, was found by friends about 4 p.m. Monday in the mobile home. At first, troopers were calling the death suspicious, but later Monday said it had been ruled a homicide.

Trooper Jack Keller, public information officer for Troop D in Oneida, said the autopsy has been completed but state police are not releasing a cause of death at this time. He would not say if the body suffered any stab wounds or gun shots.

“We want to wait on that,” he said of the cause of death. “We’re following several leads and we are progressing.”

Anyone with information regarding Miller’s death should call State Police in Fulton at 598-2112.

Investigators believe there is no danger to the public concerning this death.

 

Fulton Speed Demons strong as swim season begins

The Fulton YMCA Speed Demons team has begun its season and already turned in some strong performances.

The team consists of swimmers ages 5 to 18 and is part of the CNY YMCA Competitive Swim League that includes Auburn, Norwich, Watertown, Oneida, Oneonta and Cortland.

Swimmers can compete in the freestyle, breaststroke, backstroke, butterfly and individual medley (IM, one of each stroke).

Events are categorized by age group: Seniors Class A (age 15-18) , B( 13-14) & C (11-12), Juniors Class D (9-10) & E (8 & under).

Coaches enter swimmers in three individual events each meet plus a relay. Practices and home competitions take place at Granby Elementary School in a 25-yard pool and swimmers push themselves at each dual meet to achieve a personal best swim time in the event swimming.

Taking a few seconds off an event time is often a challenge. The team is coached by Head Coach Cassandra Izyk and Assistant Coaches Cameron Lanich, and Ashley LaDue.

The Speed Demons started their season with an away meet in Auburn followed by a home meet against Cortland.

Starting the season strong against Auburn with first place finishes were first-year swimmer Joely LaPage (25 free), Ryan Morehouse (100 back) and Casey Jones (100 back).

Swimming personal best times were:

Naomi Roberts (50 free, 100 free, 50 back)

Angel Croci (50 free)

Alexis Loomis (50 free, 100 free)

Annaliese Archer (50 free, 50 fly)

Swimmers saw their hard work at practice pay off at the second meet of the season against Cortland.

Junior  swimmers Molly Williams and Courtney Pierce were 2 of 26 Fulton swimmers entered in the 100 Free and had the greatest time reductions of all events, crushing their previous times by 15 and 16 seconds.

Senior swimmer Anna Guernsey achieved the same improvement in her 200 IM. Junior teammate Hailey Coady posted a best time in the 25 back, taking 1st place.

Additional swimmers recording improvement in their events were:

Caleb Trepasso (50 free, 100 free)

Braeden Dempsey (50 free, 100 free, 50 back)

Tyler LaDue (50 free, 100 free, 50 back)

Zachary Loomis (50 free, 100 free, 50 back)

Oswego Little League registration Feb. 11

The 2014 baseball season for Oswego Little League will kick off with the annual Spaghetti Dinner and Player Registration from 5 to 9 p.m. Tuesday Feb. 11 at the Oswego Elks Lodge.

The season will be highlighted by Little League Baseball’s 75th Anniversary, which was established in 1939 in Williamsport, Pennsylvania.

It will be the 59th season for Oswego Little League.

“It’s great to think about the nice weather and the start of Oswego Little League baseball this upcoming spring,” said Tim Murphy, president of Oswego Little League.

“We are equally excited about our traditional spaghetti dinner and player registration on February 11th. We hope to have a great night out with new and returning players and their families,” he said.

Murphy said Oswego Little League offers six divisions of organized youth baseball for all boys and girls, ages 5 through 16, including the Challenger Division, for players with special needs.

Registration fees vary by age and can be found on the league’s website.

Children residing within the boundaries of the Oswego City School District are eligible to register with Oswego Little League.

Registrants are required to provide proof of age, verification of residence inside the League’s boundary, and provide a signed copy of the Medical Release form.

Volunteer forms are also available. Oswego Little League has a need for many new volunteers, to fill several positions of need. Managers, coaches and team parents are needed. League volunteers are also needed for concession, field maintenance, scorekeepers and umpires.

The required forms and instructions are available now at www.oswegolittleleague.com, and may be filled out in advance, or at the registration tables Feb. 11.

Spaghetti dinners will be available for eat in or take out. Delivery of dinners may be arranged for groups that have to work that evening.

Pre-sale tickets are available from the league’s board of directors and at Oswego Printing at 412 W. First St. and Murphy’s Automotive Solutions at 21 Fred Haynes Boulevard in Oswego.

There will be an additional opportunity to register in person from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, March 1 at the Oswego YMCA Armory Building.

Oswego Little League is a fun and safe environment for your children to learn and play baseball. Register by March 1st to reserve a roster spot.

Further information and assistance is available by e-mailing coach@oswegolittleleague.com.

Little League, founded in 1939 in Williamsport, Pa., is the world’s largest youth sports program with more than 2.4 million children and 1 million volunteers in more than 83 countries and all 50 states.

Local students earn master’s degrees at SUNY Oswego

Several local residents completed their graduate studies in December at SUNY Oswego and were recognized Dec. 14 at the college’s commencement.

Ashley Ackerman of Kaine Road in Altmar (Master of Science in Education, literacy education)

Marianne Hirsh of P.O. Box 55 in Cato (Master of Science in Education, special education)

Shannon Blumer of Shanty Creek Road in Central Square (Master of Science in Education, literacy education)

William DePaolo of Honey Hill Road in Fulton (Master of Science in Education, technology education)

Nicole Jackowski of Silk Road in Fulton (Master of Science in Education, special education)

Rachel Mocyk of County Route 3 in Fulton (Master of Science in Education, literacy education)

Lori Moreth of Kellogg Road in Hannibal (Master of Science, mental health counseling)

Bethany Simmons of State Route 104A in Hannibal (Master of Science in Education, literacy education)

Samantha Carioti of P.O. Box 236 in Phoenix (Master of Business Administration, management)

Jessica Schauer of Oswego River Road in Phoenix (Master of Business Administration, accounting)

Stacey Petersen of County Route 2 in Pulaski (Master of Science in Education, literacy education)

A 153-year-old comprehensive college in the State University of New York system, Oswego enrolls about 8,000 students in its College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; School of Business; School of Communication, Media and the Arts; and School of Education.

 

Cardiologist speaks during Heart Month

As part of Oswego Health’s heart-healthy activities during February, board-certified cardiologist Thomas Grady Jr., will be the guest speaker at an Ask the Doctor presentation at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 18.

His presentation will be held in the lower level JPC conference room of the Oswego Health Services Center, which is adjacent to Oswego Hospital.

During this latest Ask the Doctor program, Grady will discuss how to be heart healthy and the importance of a cardiac rehab program for those who have had a heart event.

Grady’s past programs on heart-related issues have been very informative and educational.

An accomplished physician in his specialty and affiliated with SJH Cardiology Associates, Grady is providing care to Oswego Hospital patients and has office hours for community members in suite 270 of the Oswego Health Services Center. He can be reached at 349-5752.

Grady earned his undergraduate degree from the College of Holy Cross in Worcester, Mass., and attended medical school at Tufts University School of Medicine.

At Tufts, he was presented several major awards, including the Zarren Family Award for Excellence in Clinical Cardiology and the Hewlett Packard Award for Excellence in Internal Medicine.

He also served as president of Alpha Omega Alpha, an honor society for medical students and was the college’s representative to the American Heart Association.

Following medical school, he served in the U.S. Navy where he completed his first internship. After his honorable discharge, Grady completed his internship and residency training at Duke University Medical Center.

He fulfilled his fellowship at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation.

“This was a great experience where I worked alongside cutting-edge technology and individuals who were the best in their fields,” Grady said.

He is a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology and a member of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology and the American Heart Association.

The Ask The Doctor Forum is a free presentation sponsored by the Oswego Health Community Development Office.

The Ask The Doctor Forum is designed to create an open dialogue between health care providers/professionals and interested members of the greater Oswego County community.

For more information on the forum,  call 349-5500.

Students see the ugly truth behind cigarette smoking

If vanity will prevent local students from smoking, staff members from Oswego Health are ready to demonstrate some ugly facts.

Oswego Health’s Susan Callaway and Rachel Baglia, both registered nurses and community educators, showed seventh-graders at Fulton Junior High School firsthand how smoking could change their appearance, if they smoked into their 60s.

The nurse educators first discussed the dangers of smoking cigarettes, electronic cigarettes and smokeless tobacco.

They also shared advertising tactics used by tobacco companies to encourage youths to smoke and discussed the cost of cigarettes, which at about $10 a pack, could add up to $3,000 during a year.

But it was special age-progression software that sent the students the biggest message.

Using this software on loan from the Rural Health Network of Oswego County, a picture was taken of a student in each class. On a computer screen the students were shown how their classmate would look if he/she smoked to age 65.

When the students were shown how unattractive their fellow student would look if he/she smoked until their mid-60s, most were quite surprised.

This is the second year that Oswego Health’s nurse educators have visited the seventh-grade health classrooms of Dan Stadtmiller and Dan Gilmore.

“When our students walk out into the real world, they tend to forget the dangers of smoking and this helps them have a lasting impression,” said Dan Stadtmiller.

He added that last year’s program was very well received by the students.

“I can pull any of our eighth graders from the hallway today and they will say they remember this program from last year,” Stadtmiller said.

He also shared that the smoking cessation program was the student’s favorite outside presentation last year. “They remembered it and it stuck with them and I think that’s the most important thing,” he said.

The nurse educators are expected to provide similar programs later this year to junior-high age students in both the Hannibal and Oswego City school districts.

 

‘Safe haven’ meeting set for Feb. 11 in Fulton

By Ashley M. Casey

The Catholic Daughters of America, Court Pere LeMoyne #833, are holding an informational meeting about the “Safe Haven” program at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 11 at the Fulton Municipal Building.

Timothy Jaccard, founder of the AMT Children of Hope, will present a program and answer questions about an anonymous, safe drop-off system for unwanted infants.

In July 2010, New York state updated the 2000 Abandoned Infant Protection Act to remove criminal liability for parents who surrender unwanted infants to a “safe location,” usually a hospital, fire station or police department.

A person may drop off an infant less than 30 days old — no questions asked  — as long as the child does not show any sign of being abused or harmed.

Patty Mancino, regent of the local Catholic Daughters of America chapter, saw Jaccard speak at a statewide Catholic Daughters of America conference last April.

After Catholic Daughters of America Program Coordinator Teresa Kempston contacted Jaccard with questions about his Safe Haven program, Jaccard offered to come speak in Fulton.

Jaccard sent promotional materials, and Catholic Daughters of America has been spreading the word across the area through decals on Menter Ambulances.

“He’s the one that has worked so hard into making the law,” Mancino said of Jaccard.

In January 2011, Liverpool police found a newborn girl who had suffocated to death in a Dumpster.

The child’s mother was sentenced to 13 years in prison after pleading guilty to first-degree manslaughter in her daughter’s death.

Safe Haven programs, which are available across the country, have been instituted to give parents a legal alternative to abandoning and risking the lives of their infants.

“Upstate, it hasn’t caught on like it has in other parts of the state,” said Fulton Mayor Ronald L. Woodward Sr.

He said the meeting would serve to educate local agencies about the “Safe Haven” program and how agencies and organizations can  become a safe drop-off location.

Mancino said Kempston has invited area fire departments, local legislators and the Greater Fulton Area Council of Christian Churches to the Feb. 11 meeting.

“You can’t just leave a baby on a step or a porch. It’s not safe,” Mancino said. “There’s got to be some help out there to save these lives.”

Mancino said the idea has piqued the interest of several local fire departments. The general public is invited as well.

“The more you sit at the dinner table and discuss these controversial topics is how you get them out there,” she said.

“I think it’s good that people are educated, and young girls know they have an alternative,” Woodward said. “We’d certainly feel very, very bad if something like that happened in this community when there were other alternatives.”

Mancino acknowledged that training Oswego County agencies to be Safe Haven locations is a big endeavor.

“It’s got to start someplace. Baby steps,” she said.

For more information about the Safe Haven informational meeting, call Catholic Daughters Regent Patty Mancino at 598-9748.

 

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Need help?

To find the Safe Haven location nearest to you, call AMT Children of Hope’s anonymous, confidential hotline at 877-796-HOPE (4673).

To learn about safe drop-off locations under the Abandoned Infant Protection Act, call 866-505-SAFE (7233).

Visit the New York state Office of Children and Family Services website at ocfs.ny.gov for more resources.