Category Archives: Featured Stories

SUNY Oswego’s Tyler Hall to get a facelift

Submitted by SUNY Oswego

SUNY Oswego’s Tyler Hall will undergo a $22.2 million rejuvenation starting this summer, welcoming campus and community about a year and a half later to a more approachable, flexible and high-tech home for the performing and fine arts.

Work will include a fully accessible Waterman Theatre with modern seating, lighting, sound and multimedia; a two-story music rehearsal hall doubling as a new venue for small performances and facade improvements that include two inviting new entrances at the building’s eastern corners  leading to a spacious and welcoming lobby.

There also will be an expanded box office, new elevator, larger and more flexible Tyler Art Gallery; a digital media lab and a recording studio; and a host of environmentally friendly improvements to the building’s heating, ventilation, air conditioning and other systems, from lower level to roof.

That comprises Phase 1 of a three-phase master plan to revitalize the 46-year-old Tyler Hall and nearby Hewitt Union as an arts district and long-planned home of the college’s School of Communication, Media and the Arts.

“There’s still a lot to do in Tyler,” said Fritz Messere, dean of the School of Communication, Media and the Arts and a key liaison articulating arts needs and ideas to Pfeiffer Partners Architects and their engineering, acoustics and other consultants.

“But this first phase really sets the stage by completely renovating the mechanicals, by reconfiguring the entrances and lobby area giving students and the public a place to congregate, and it gives music students a place to rehearse and perform, and students in art, art history and museum studies a better place to study and display their works,” Messere said.

Bette & Cring, a Latham contractor with an office in Watertown, was the apparent low bidder Feb. 5 to bring to life the SUNY Construction Fund-financed project.

The company has done higher education construction projects at University at Albany, Albany College of Pharmacy, SUNY Adirondack, SUNYIT and Hudson Valley Community College, among others.

 Alternative venues

During the renovation period for the 81,500-square-foot Tyler Hall, the SUNY Oswego art, music and theatre departments and the Artswego Performing Arts Series will offer exhibitions and performances in alternate campus and community locations — using the temporary dislocation as an opportunity to explore new ways of engaging audiences.

“We like the motto adopted by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art as they face a similar situation,” said Associate Dean Julie Pretzat. “Closed for construction, but more open than ever!”

Artswego Director John Shaffer also expressed excitement about possibilities that have arisen during the search for alternate venues.

For example, he said, negotiations are in progress with a Brooklyn-based dance company for the creation of a site-specific performance at a city park or historical site.

“The temporary loss of Waterman Theatre and Tyler Art Gallery can be a time of festive exploration for the campus and community with surprises and lasting benefits for both,” Shaffer said.

Messere said classroom and lab theater modernization and many other improvements in Tyler would need to await Phase 2 funding. The money for phases 2 and 3 of the project remain to be allocated in the state’s capital plan.

“My goal is to move all of communication studies and graphic design into a new, reimagined Hewitt Union, and to have an arts precinct or an arts district that combines visual communication, multimedia communication and the fine arts together in one place,” Messere said.

Road to renewal

Tom LaMere, the college’s director of planning and design, said he’s hopeful Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s capital plan could accommodate the remaining work on Tyler and Hewitt a couple of years from now.

In the meantime, he said at any given point in time during Tyler’s Phase 1 renovation there could be up to 60 workers employed in various trades.

Messere expressed particular excitement about the music rehearsal hall, something the college has never before had.

“The rehearsal hall has been designed in a very striking manner, so it’s going to look very interesting as well,” he said.

“It’s really going be to a kind of showplace in some ways, and I think that’s going to encourage students who want to study music to come to Oswego,” he said.

 

Fulton wrestlers compete today to go to New York State Tourney

By Dan Farfaglia

All wrestlers in Section 3 today (Saturday, Feb. 15) are competing at Onondaga Community College for the right to represent their weight class at the New York State Tournament,  which will be held in Albany Feb. 28 and March 1.

In order to take part in today’s event, they had to place in the top five in their Class tournament.

Last Saturday at Indian River High School, the Fulton Red Raider wrestling team finished in first place in the Section 3 Class As.

Overall they accumulated 264.5 points and 16 of their wrestlers earned the right to participate in today’s state qualifiers.

Mitch Woodworth (120 pounds), Travis Race (160 pounds) and Jonathan Earl (132 pounds) finished the day as champions in their individual weight classes.

Joe Abelgore (106 pounds) and Collin Flynn (145 pounds) came in second place.

Finishing in third were Kevin Tucker (113 pounds), Tim Holden (138 pounds), Kyle Ware (also at 145 pounds), Aaron Yablonski (152 pounds), James Bailey (170 pounds), Noah Gates (182 pounds) and Matt Marshall (220 pounds).

Coming in fourth place were Nick Noel (99 pounds), Mitch LaBeef (126 pounds) and Malachi Manford (285 pounds).

Jacob Bailey (152 pounds) won the fith place prize.

Hannibal, Phoenix compete in track championships

By Rob Tetro

The Hannibal and Phoenix boys’ and girls’ varsity indoor track teams took part in The Class B, Section 3 Championships Feb. 6 at SRC Arena at Onondaga Community College.

Hannibal’s girls’ varsity indoor track team earned a fifth place overall finish. The Warriors boys’ varsity indoor track team finished in seventh place overall.

The Phoenix girl’s varsity indoor track team placed seventh overall while the boys’ from Phoenix came in with a fourth place overall finish.

Hannibal girls

In the Girls 55 Meter Dash, Hannibal’s Tayler Dence placed third at 7.69 seconds. Dence had another successful showing in the 300 Meter Dash, where she placed fourth at 45.67 seconds.

In the Girls 100 Meter Run, eighth-grader Reilly Harris finished second with a time of 3:24.5 while Kristen D’Angelo came in seventh at 3:29.56. Harris was also impressive in the Girls 1500 Meter Run where she placed eighth with a time of 5:20.42.

In the Girls 300 Meter Run, Michaela Sheldon placed sixth at 12:02.89.

Perhaps one of most memorable moments for Hannibal’s Tayler Dence was still yet to come. Her time of 9.75 seconds earned her The Class B, Section 3 Championship in the Girls 55 Meters Hurdles event.

Led by Paige LaFurney, Katherine Martinez, Rebekah Mills and Kasi Blanchard, the Lady Warriors earned an eighth place finish in the Girls 4 x 200 Relay with a time of 2:17.32.

In the Girls 4 x 400 Meter Relay, Kasi Blanchard, Paige LaFurney, Rebekah Mills and Michaela Sheldon led Hannibal to seventh place at 5:17.49.

Led by Reilly Harris, Kristen D’Angelo, Rebekah Mills and Michaela Sheldon, the Lady Warriors clinched fourth in the 4 x 800 Meter Relay at 11:12.60. Kristen D’Angelo placed fifth with a distance of 14-08.75 in the Girls Long Jump.

Phoenix girls

The Phoenix girls’ varsity indoor track team had its fair share of success as well.

In the Girls 600 Meter Run, Haylie Virginia finished fourth at 1:48.73. Destiny Teel placed 12th with a time of 10.59 seconds the Girls 55 Meter Hurdles.

Led by Brandi Ashley, Destiny Maybe, Amanda Deryke and Alexis Gabrielle, the Lady Firebirds placed seventh in the Girls 4 x 2000 Meter Relay with a time of 2:15.50. In the Girls 4 x 800 Meter Relay, Meghan Lantz, Brianna Ball, Emma Brunell and Emilie Schneider led Phoenix to eighth with a time of 12:58.01.

In the Girls High Jump, Haylie Virginia placed fifth with a distance of 4-08.00. Destiny Teel placed second in the Girls Pole Vault at 8-06.00.

It seems Haylie Virginia saved her best for last. With a distance of 16-04.00, Virginia earned the Sectional Championship in The Girls Long Jump Event.

Hannibal boys

It was another stellar effort by the Hannibal boys’ varsity indoor track team.

In the Boys 600 Meter Run, Ben Slate placed seventh at 1:34.73. Slate later won the Sectional Championship in the Boys 1000 Meters with a time of 2:44.12.

In the Boys 1600 Meter Run, Jason McFarland finished sixth at 5:12.07. McFarland was also solid in the Boys 3200 Meter Run, finishing third at 10:29.36.

In the Boys 55 Meter Hurdles Event, Sean Lange earned ninth place with a time of 9.86 seconds. Led by Ben Raymond, Jared Mason, Austin Cooper and John Motell, the Warriors took fifth in the Boys 4 x 200 Meter Relay with a time of 1:46.70.

In The 4 x 400 Meter Relay, Ben Raymond, Blake Farnham, Austin Cooper and Sean Lange led Hannibal to seventh place at 4:04.93. The Warriors capped off the event by taking third in the Boys 4 x 800 Meter Relay, with Austin Baker, Jason Mc Farland, John Motell and Ben Slate posting a time of 9:14.94.

Phoenix boys

It was also a very impressive day for The Phoenix boys indoor track team.

In the Boys 600 Meter Run, Mike Leach placed fifth at 1:33.55. Following Leach was Anthony Brienza who finished eighth at 1:36.76.

With a time of 3:00.96, Eric Hillpot came in fifth in the Boys 1000 Meter Run.

In the Boys 3200 Meter Run, Mike Girard placed sixth at 11:30.91. Dylan Switzer placed sixth in the Boys 55 Meter Hurdles with a time of 9.41 seconds.

The team of Mike Leach, Anthony Brienza, Sean Madden and Dylan Switzer took third in the Boys 4 x 400 Meter Relay with a time of 3:44.60. The Firebirds were also stellar in the Boys 4 x 600 Meter Relay with Mike Leach, Eric Leach, Mike Girard and Anthony Brienza placing second in a time of 9:14.86.

Eric Hillpot won the Sectional Champions in the Boys High Jump with jump of  5-08.00. In the pole vault, Andy Padula came in second with a height of 12-00.00.

The Firebirds also had a decent showing in the Boys Long Jump, with Andy Padula in second with a distance of 18-11.00. Teammate Sean Madden came in fourth with a jump of 18-06.00 and Dylan Switzer placed eighth with a distance of 17-08.50.

The day concluded with another Sectional Championship for a Phoenix athlete, as Andy Padula won the Sectional Championship in the Boys Triple Jump with a distance of 41-02.50.

Hannibal girls’ hoops close season strongly

By Rob Tetro

The Hannibal girls’ varsity basketball team won 3 out of its last 4 games of the regular season, finishing a 11-6 campaign.

On Feb. 1, Hannibal knocked off Solvay, 44-35. The Lady Warriors rolled past Jordan-Elbridge, 60-27 on Feb. 3.

On Feb. 7, Hannibal fell to county rival, Altmar-Parish-Williamstown, 50-38. The wrapped up  the year with a win over Cazenovia, 46-41 on Feb. 11.

Hannibal and Solvay were tied at 9 after the first quarter of their game. Solvay pulled ahead in the second and took a 4-point lead at the half.

The Lady Warriors then took control of the game in the third quarter, outscoring  Solvay by 15 points to take an 11-point lead. Solvay couldn’t overtake the lead Hannibal had put on the board so the Lady Warriors won by 9 points.

Leading the way for the Lady Warriors was Devin Sorell with 20 points, followed by Spencer Kenney with 9, Sydney Alton with 7, McKenzie Mattison with 5 and Rachel Shute with 3.

The Lady Warriors pounded Jordan-Elbridge Feb. 3, with Devin Sorell scoring 22 points. Gabby Griffin scored 13, followed by McKenzie Mattison with 11 and Sarah Otis with 6.

A-P-W was trailing Hannibal after the first quarter of its game and then Hannibal doubled its lead for a score of 22-16 at the half.

But then, A-P-W began pouring it on, outscoring he Lady Warriors by 8 points in the third quarter and 10 points in the fourth quarter for the 50-38 win.

Leading the way for A-P-W were Devin Jones and Kylee Bartlett, who scored 11 points each against Hannibal. Following Jones and Bartlett was Katie Palmer with 9, Alexis Stevens with 8 and Erin Stever with 7.

Hannibal was led by Devin Sorell with 17 points, followed by Sydney Alton, Spencer Kenney and McKenzie Mattison with 5 points each. Gabby Griffin added 4 points.

Hannibal stormed past Cazenovia in the season finale, but the two teams were tied at 13 after the first quarter.

Caz pulled ahead during the second quarter, outscoring the Lady Warriors by 2 points to take a 24-22 lead into halftime.

Hannibal took care of business during the second half, outscoring Caz by 4 points in the third quarter and 3 points in the fourth quarter to win 46-41.

Leading the way for Hannibal was Devin Sorell with 24 points, followed by Spencer Kenney with 9, McKenzie Mattison with 6, Sydney Alton with 3 and Gabby Griffin added 3.

The Sportsman’s World — The Crossbow War

By Leon Archer

In July, 1863, when the armed forces of the Confederacy lost Vicksburg, their last stronghold on the Mississippi, and suffered the punishing defeat of Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia at Gettysburg, the South would have been wise to have sued for peace, but they soldiered on for nearly two more years before the civil war finally drew to a close.

The opponents in the Crossbow War could take a lesson from the misfortunes of Old Dixie.

Just as the Confederacy lost the war, imperceptibly at first, battlefield by battlefield, while the invading Yankees became stronger and more numerous, so the forces resisting the coming of the crossbow are facing defeat.

It may not be this year in New York state, but the results from battlefield to battlefield across this country leave little doubt who the winners will be in the end.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced his support for the legalization of the crossbow for hunting purposes in New York state during his State of the State message.

And just as importantly, he would give regulation authority for its use to the state Department of Environmental Conservation.

I don’t agree with a lot of what our governor has said and done, but I’m with him 100 percent on this.

Of course, we will need both houses of our legislature to produce legislation which the majority will support and pass in order for the governor’s proposal to become reality.

That legislation should include the final battlefield, which is that the classification of the crossbow would be as a legal bow for use in any season and any area where archery is allowed, including archery only areas.

If that final victory doesn’t come this year, it will come soon. The hand writing is on the wall, and further resistance can only damage both sides, not change the final outcome.

Since the early 1970s, when only Arkansas and Ohio allowed hunting with a crossbow, the number of states accepting its use has grown steadily. Today, a total of 34 states have loosened or dropped their restrictions on crossbows since the year 2000.

At present, the battle is completely over in 24 states which now allow the crossbow to be used during any hunting season where archery is allowed, a movement that is gaining popularity in other open-minded states.

This is a civil war, sportsmen fighting sportsmen, both sides believing they are right, but only one side can win, and the empirical evidence is clear, crossbows are in our future.

The strongest resistance comes from a sportsman’s group, The New York Bow Hunters. They argue the crossbow is some sort of superior weapon, a silent super weapon that will allow poachers to decimate the deer herd.

While they claim the crossbow has an effective range of nearly seventy yards, at the same time they suggest more deer will be wounded and run off if crossbows are allowed, because they claim the crossbow is not as efficient as the bow they use.

They say the crossbow is so easy to use that a novice can be slaughtering deer on the same day they buy it. They say the crossbow does not require the same amount of dedication and commitment that is necessary to become a good archer.

A lot of other things they say about the crossbow were used by opponents of the compound bow and releases back in the 70s. Those arguments don’t hold any more water today when applied to the crossbow than they did back when they were applied to the compound bow.

I have to admit that I have never hunted with a crossbow, but I have shot them at targets quite a bit. I can tell you one thing from my own experience. The crossbow is very accurate at close range out to 30 yards or so, but at 70 yards it leaves a great deal to be desired. I would hardly call it effective at that range. At the longer ranges, the compound is much better, but even then, few archers will chance shooting at a deer 70 yards away.

As far as a tool for poaching, it is too cumbersome and why use it when a 22 caliber rifle would do the job far better.

I have never been a poacher, but I knew an old fellow years ago who lived up on the Tug Hill east of Sandy Creek, and my father told me that man fed his family on venison year round that he took with a single shot 22 rifle. It is quiet, doesn’t draw attention, and it is lethal well beyond the effective range of the crossbow or compound.

As far as wounding more deer, think about this. There is no reason why a bolt from a crossbow should cause the loss of any more deer than one might expect from an arrow from a compound bow.

They both work exactly the same way, causing reasonably quick death from massive bleeding due to the razor sharp blades. To put down the crossbow on this account is to damn the compound bow as well.

When I bought my first compound bow, I was able to hit the bullseye at 30 yards after just a couple of shots to adjust my aiming pin. After that I was pretty consistent.

Later that week, I was shooting from the roof on my shed, putting arrows through styrofoam cups on the ground. It didn’t require any great amount of dedication and commitment to use the compound bow well enough to hit any deer that wandered by my tree stand.

The dedication and commitment has little to do with the ease of use of either the crossbow or the modern compound bow. It is learning to hunt successfully and consistently that requires dedication and commitment, and that is true whether you hunt with a rifle, shotgun, crossbow, compound bow or black powder rifle.

I truly believe that bow hunters just don’t want to share their archery season with anyone carrying a crossbow. They deny that, but the denial has a false ring to it in my ears.

I believe it is time to end the war. It is time for bow hunters and crossbow hunters to learn to live together. I’m pretty sure, in a few years, everyone will be wondering what all the fuss was about.

That’s what has happened in the 24 states that have led the way.

States Allowing Crossbow Hunting

Arkansas 

Ohio

Michigan

Florida

Kansas

Delaware

Indiana

Alabama

Maryland

Texas

Pennsylvania

Nebraska

Mississippi

Rhode Island

North Dakota

Virginia

New Jersey

Georgia

Kentucky

South Carolina

North Carolina

Tennessee

Oklahoma

Wyoming

 

Fulton varsity hockey finishes season on a sour note

By Rob Tetro

The Fulton varsity hockey team went 1-4 during its last 5 games of the season.

The team finished the season with a 2-18-1 overall record.

On Jan. 26, Lake Placid rolled past Fulton, 6-2. The Red Raiders knocked off Ontario Bay, 6-4 on Jan. 29. On Jan. 30, Watertown-IHC held off Fulton, 4-3. Watertown-IHC also won the Feb. 3 rematch with the Red Raiders, 5-1.

Syracuse (a team consisting of several Syracuse-area players) cruised past Fulton, 5-1 on Feb. 4.

Lake Placid jumped out to an early 3-0 lead over Fulton in th first period and carried the 3-goal advantage into the half.

The Red Raiders were unable to get any closer during the game, as Lake Placid outscored Fulton by a goal during the third period en route to the 6-2 win.

The Red Raiders were led by Bryce Knight and Austin Vashaw with a goal each. Following Knight and Vashaw were Seth DeLisle and Stan Kubis with an assist each. Goalies Spencer Evans and Brandon Ladd combined to save 35 shots.

After a hard-fought first period in the Ontario Bay game, the teams were tied at 1-1.

Fulton stormed ahead during the second period, outscoring Ontario Bay by 2 goals to take a 4-2 lead. Both teams scored 2 goals during the third period as the Red Raiders came away with a 6-4 win.

Leading for Fulton was Bryce Knight with 4 goals and an assist. Trae Sheldon had a goal and an assist. Seth DeLisle is credited with 3 assists and Ross Ryan tallied an assist. Goalie Brandon Ladd saved 21 shots Ontario Bay sent his way.

Watertown-IHC escaped with a hard fought win over the Red Raiders. the game was tied at 1-1 following the first period and then Fulton built a lead in the second to take a 3-2 lead into intermission.

Watertown-IHC made the most of the third period, putting the puck in the net to tie the game at 3 and force overtime. Watertown-IHC then scored the game winning goal in overtime.

Fulton was led by Bryce Knight wiht a goal and an assist. Seth DeLisle and Rocco Cannata had a goal each while Trae Sheldon is credited with 2 assists. Matt Billion also tallied an assist. Goalie Brandon Ladd saved 41 shots.

In the rematch with Watertown-IHC, Watertown jumped out to an early 3-0 lead in the first period. Both teams scored a goal in the second period and then Watertown-IHC scored again in the third period and held Fulton scoreless to win 5-1.

Leading the way for Fulton was Seth DeLisle with a goal assisted by Trae Sheldon. Goalie Brandon Ladd is credited with 31 saves.

In the Syracuse game, the Red Raiders trailed 1-0 after the first period. In the second, both teams scored one goal as Syracuse took a 2-1 lead into intermission.

Syracuse pulled away during the third period, outscoring Fulton by 3 goals to secure a 5-1 win.

The Red Raiders were led by Seth Cooney with one goal. Eric Forderkonz and Kris Grow had an assist each. Goalies Brandon Ladd and Landon VanAlstine combined to save 40 shots.

Fitzhugh Park elementary evacuated due to smoke

UPDATE from the police and fire departments:

At about 11:41 a.m., Oswego City Fire and Police crews were called to the Fitzhugh Park Elementary School (195 East Bridge Street Oswego, NY) in regard to a small fire
isolated in a trash can.
The school was evacuated as emergency crews arrived on scene. Upon arrival, the fire had already been extinguished by a school district employee.
The scene was evaluated by the Oswego Fire Department and deemed safe to allow reentry.
There were no injuries reported as a result of the incident, and Oswego Fire and Police personnel remain on scene investigating the cause of the fire in cooperation with Oswego City School District personnel.

Students at the Fitzhugh Park Elementary School in Oswego were evacuated from the building for a short time this morning as smoke was reported on the second floor.

Upon further investigation the source of the smoke was a fire in a waste basket.

The Oswego Fire Department and district personnel have been on the scene. 

There were no injuries.

Officials have allowed the students to return to their classrooms.

District officials are continuing their investigation  into the cause of the fire.

Snow now, tonight, tomorrow

The National Weather Service is calling for a winter storm warning for heavy snow to be in effect in Oswego County until 1 p.m. Friday (Feb. 14).

Snow will be heavy at time and there will be accumulations of an inch or less this afternoon, 4 to 7 inches tonight and 1 to 3 inches Friday.

Visibility will be as low as a quarter of a mile. Travel will be extremely hazardous with slippery snow covered roads and reduced visibilities.