Category Archives: Featured Stories

If it’s spring, then Rudy’s is open

Rudy’s Lakeside Drive-In opened for the season Wednesday March 19 with a full house of patrons. Cars were parked in both lots and across the front and sides of the building at lunchtime. The stand, famous for its seafood and hot sauce, has spring hours of 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. The eatery uses 200 gallons of ketchup every week  and cooks 2,000 pounds of fish every week — a total of 60,000 pounds of fish a season. Rudy’s rice pudding, macaroni salad, cole slaw and tzatziki are all proprietary recipes prepared fresh daily. And local butcher, Boscos, has supplied beef to Rudy’s for more than 50 years and fresh produce comes daily from Ontario Orchards, which is right down the road. For more info on Rudy’s, go to 222.rudyshot.com
Rudy’s Lakeside Drive-In opened for the season Wednesday March 19 with a full house of patrons. Cars were parked in both lots and across the front and sides of the building at lunchtime. The stand, famous for its seafood and hot sauce, has spring hours of 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. The eatery uses 200 gallons of ketchup every week and cooks 2,000 pounds of fish every week — a total of 60,000 pounds of fish a season. Rudy’s rice pudding, macaroni salad, cole slaw and tzatziki are all proprietary recipes prepared fresh daily. And local butcher, Boscos, has supplied beef to Rudy’s for more than 50 years and fresh produce comes daily from Ontario Orchards, which is right down the road.
For more info on Rudy’s, go to 222.rudyshot.com

Nine Mile 2 out of service for refueling

Operators removed Nine Mile Point Unit 2 from service at about 12:30 a.m. today to begin the station’s planned refueling outage.

During the outage, Constellation Energy Nuclear Group employees and more than 1,200 supplemental workers will perform more than 2,000 maintenance activities, tests and safety inspections on a variety of plant components and systems. Many of the activities performed during the outage cannot be accomplished while the unit is operational and all are designed to ensure the continued safe, efficient and reliable production of electricity.

“The safe, reliable operation of Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station is always our top priority,” said site vice president Chris Costanzo. “We’re also proud to stimulate our community’s economy by bringing to the area so many supplemental workers who will support local businesses.”

In addition to replacing nearly one third of the reactor’s fuel, outage workers will be performing a host of equipment enhancements and modifications while the unit is offline. Nine Mile’s two units are on a 24-month refueling cycle. Efficient completion of this necessary work, combined with longer operating cycles, helps the customer by optimizing nuclear energy’s benefits as a reliable source of emissions-free electricity.

 

Veteran of the Year to be Fulton’s Memorial Day Parade Grand Marshal

Each fall, the Fulton Veterans’ Council chooses a Veteran of the Year from among the membership of several Fulton veterans’ organizations. This year, Jim Weinhold, center, was named Veteran of the Year and is seen with Fulton Mayor Ron Woodward (right) and Memorial Day Salute Chairman Larry Macner (left). Weinhold will be the Grand Marshal for the Memorial Day Salute Parade May 24. The parade is sponsored by the Fulton Lions, Kiwanis, Rotary and Sunrise Rotary service clubs, in cooperation with the Fulton Veteran’s Council.
Each fall, the Fulton Veterans’ Council chooses a Veteran of the Year from among the membership of several Fulton veterans’ organizations. This year, Jim Weinhold, center, was named Veteran of the Year and is seen with Fulton Mayor Ron Woodward (right) and Memorial Day Salute Chairman Larry Macner (left). Weinhold will be the Grand Marshal for the Memorial Day Salute Parade May 24. The parade is sponsored by the Fulton Lions, Kiwanis, Rotary and Sunrise Rotary service clubs, in cooperation with the Fulton Veteran’s Council.

Jim Weinhold, of Fulton, has been named Veteran of the Year and will be the grand marshal of Fulton’s Memorial Day Salute Parade May 24.

Weinhold, 83, has lived in Fulton for 31 years, coming here from Seneca Knolls outside Baldwinsville.

He is on his fourth year as commander of the Fulton VFW, is past commander of the Fulton American Legion, is a member of the Fulton Veterans’ Council and is captain of the VFW Color Guard, which presides at military funerals in the area.

Weinhold said he served seven years in the Navy and 15 years in the Air National Guard with the 174th “Boys from Syracuse.”

From 1953 to 1954, he served on a Navy ship near the 38th parallel just off Korea as the Korean War was winding down.

He was a radarman and petty officer third class in the Navy.

In the Air Guard, he was in the supply field and retired as a master sergeant.

Weinhold worked for Western Electric for years and after retiring, worked as a custodian for the Fulton school district at G. Ray Bodley High School, Volney Elementary School and the Education Center.

“I am very humbled to be named Veteran of the Year. I’m very appreciative,” he said. “This is not just about me, but about all veterans alive and deceased.”

Zone changes reduce nuisances in Fulton

By Ashley M. Casey

At the March 18 meeting, the Fulton Common Council approved two public hearings for residential zone changes in the Fifth Ward.

Properties enclosed within North Sixth, Ontario, Erie and North Seventh streets, and North Third, Oneida, Seneca and North Fourth streets block are both currently zoned as Residential R-2, which allows multi-family units.

The city seeks to change the zones to R-1A, which requires more than 50 percent of the properties to be single-family units.

Mayor Ronald S. Woodward Sr. told The Valley News the zone change will eliminate disturbances that occur in multi-family rental properties, which have contributed to the “deterioration of certain neighborhoods.”

Woodward said most of these problem properties are located in the Fifth and Sixth wards on the east side of the city.

“They generate a lot of police calls, a lot of ambulance calls, a lot of fire calls,” Woodward said.

“When one of these calls is generated, first responders have to stay until the ambulance comes. … If you’ve got somewhere else where the emergency services are needed, they’re tied up,” he said.

Woodward said city first responders received 69 calls from one resident in this area alone in 2013, and the person has called 17 times already this year.

The mayor said once more homes are filled with “working families,” the problems associated with these renters will go away. But he stressed it will take time.

“They weren’t (created) overnight, and they won’t go away overnight,” Woodward said.

Of the 33 properties between the two blocks in question, nine contain two or more families. After the zone change, these homes will be grandfathered in.

If a multi-family residence becomes vacant for more than a year, however, the property must be converted to a single-family unit or demolished.

The hearings will be held at the next Common Council meeting, at 7 p.m. April 1 in the Common Council chambers at the Fulton Municipal Building, 141 S. First St.

 

Other business

• The Common Council struck a discussion of the East Side Pool from the agenda.

Mayor Woodward said even if Fulton applied for a grant to cover the cost of the engineering study, the city would not be able to match the funds required.

“The council is not going to vote for that study because they know there’d be a 25 to 50 percent match that they’d have to bond for, and they’re not going to do that,” Woodward told The Valley News. “We’ve got to just quit spinning our wheels over it.”

Woodward said at the council meeting that the city has asked New York state’s Financial Restructuring Board about alternative funding sources for the pool study.

• A public hearing for a proposed local law that would prohibit feeding wild animals and waterfowl on public property will be held at the next council meeting, April 1.

“We’ve had quite a problem downtown with people feeding seagulls,” Woodward told the council.

He said the seagulls have made messes on cars and a mural on the Fulton Savings Bank building on South First Street.

Feral cats have been an issue, and people have been feeding geese at Stevenson Beach as well.

“The DEC frowns upon it. They claim if the feeding stops, the waterfowl will seek more remote areas for wild feeding,” Woodward said.

• Carolyn Mosier has been appointed to fill the Fulton Public Library Board of Trustees position vacated by Elizabeth Mirabito.

Mosher’s term will expire Dec. 31, 2015.

Fulton, Oswego residents take part in tough bike race

From left to right, Ron Molinari, Chris Caza, Scott Somers, Bryan Blake, Greg Mills, Jim Nicholson and Rick Bush. Absent are Teddy Volkomer, Josh Molinari and Jeff Ballard.
From left to right, Ron Molinari, Chris Caza, Scott Somers, Bryan Blake, Greg Mills, Jim Nicholson and Rick Bush. Absent are Teddy Volkomer, Josh Molinari and Jeff Ballard.

By Rob Tetro

Ten cyclists from Fulton and Oswego are in training for The Tour Of The Battenkill, considered “The Toughest Single Day Race In America”.

Bryan Blake of Central Square, Jim Nicholson, Chris Caza and Jeff Ballard of Fulton, and Scott Somers, Ron Molinari, Josh Molinari, Teddy Volkomer, Greg Mills and Rick Bush of Oswego will have their endurance put to the test when they take part in the 63-mile race in Cambridge, Washington County, April 5-6.

Cyclist Rick Bush said the team began training in November. The training process involves preparation for four basic periods: Base Training, Build, Peak and Race periods. Each period is designed to prepare cyclists for various parts of a race.

“Each period targets specific elements experienced in a given race.”, Bush said.

This year’s race will mark the third trip Bush and his teammates have made to Cambridge.

The Tour Of The Battenkill is known as “The Toughest Single Day Race In America” for a reason. As if the distance of the race wasn’t challenging enough, the participants face an uphill battle in more ways than one.

There is a section of the race that is a little more than 10 miles long that travels uphill on dirt and gravel roads. The challenge presented by the elements of the race aside, Bush points out The Tour Of The Battenkill also attracts an impressive array of cyclists.

Amateur and professional cyclists consider The Tour Of The Battenkill to be one of the premier events of their season. For Bush, being a part of this event means being a part of what he considers the most prestigious, challenging and rewarding races of the year.

He said the intensity of the training matches the difficulty of the race itself.

“The training for this one race is by far the most intense training of the season.”, Bush said.

For more information about The Tour Of The Battenkill, visit WWW.TOUROFTHE BATTENKILL.COM

Bush and his teammates express sincere gratitude to the sponsors who helped them make their third appearance in The Tour Of The Battenkill a reality — Murdock’s Bicycle and Sports, J&A Mechanical, Homestead Funding Group, Nicholson Law Firm, Summit Physical Therapy, Pathfinder Bank and Fajita Grill.

Fulton hoops on the up and up

By Rob Tetro

Seniors Mark Pollock, Seth Britton, Jeremy Langdon and Austin Haskins left their mark on the Fulton boys’ basketball program.

Despite facing some rough moments throughout their careers, they didn’t quit. Coach Matt Kimpland said it was the efforts of his seniors that set the groundwork for the improvements Fulton showed this season.

As his seniors move to the next phase of their lives, Kimpland hopes they are physically and mentally prepared to give their best efforts regardless of the challenge they face.

As it is every season, the Red Raiders faced some of the best teams Section 3 has to offer. Despite taking its lumps against some of these premier teams, Fulton proved to be far more of a formidable opponent than they were in other seasons.

In a season that saw the Red Raiders score 150 more points than they did a season ago, they also had a 5-13 overall record, which left them one game shy of qualify for Sectional play.

Kimpland said some of his younger guys can move on toward next season feeling confident, having seen what it takes to be competitive with the impressive opponents Fulton plays against year in and year out.

Looking ahead, 2014-15 figures to be an exciting season for Fulton.

After moving up to varsity last year as a freshman, Cody Green will return as junior.

This season, Green met every expectation coaches had for him. Even with teams striving to slow him down, Green scored 311 points this season.

Sophomores and juniors got a lot of playing this season and the Red Raiders hope to benefit from this next season.

A junior who had a memorable season was Chris Jones, with nearly a double-double in every game, including games against perennial powers Jamesville-DeWitt and Christian Brothers Academy.

Kimpland considers Jones to be the most improved player in the program. Despite showing progress over the summer, his breakout season was a bit of a surprise to his coaches.

Kimpland credits Green and Jones for how consistent their outside/inside play was this season and he is excited about what the duo can accomplish next season. Fulton also will see the return of third-leading scorer Josh Hudson next season.

Overall, the team appears excited and motivated headed into the off-season having doubled their win total from last season. Determined to build on the momentum the team established this season, seven of eight returning Red Raiders wasted little time beginning their preparation for next season.

The initiative his players have shown hasn’t gone unnoticed by Kimpland. In fact, he said Fulton’s future is even brighter because of the natural drive and enthusiasm his young team has displayed.

SUNY Oswego to increase its study abroad program

Submitted by SUNY Oswego

SUNY Oswego has signed on with the newly launched Generation Study Abroad program, agreeing to increase the college’s participation in study-abroad opportunities to 20 percent of undergraduates — 1 in 5 — by 2019.

Citing the challenges of rapid globalization, the Institute of International Education announced the five-year Generation Study Abroad in early March.

Its ambitious goal: bringing leaders in education, business and government together to double study-abroad participation nationally, reaching 600,000 students by the end of the decade.

Oswego joined 150 higher education institutions in 41 states as early partners in the effort, including large universities such as Cornell, Ohio State, Texas A&M and Purdue, as well as four other SUNY colleges and universities.

Joshua McKeown, Oswego’s director of international education and programs, said the help of new short-term options for study-travel, the Global Laboratory summer-research program and other initiatives have increased participation in the last five years to 15 percent of the college’s undergraduates from about 5 percent, and Oswego is poised to make the next move upward.

“I think this is the perfect time to take on this challenge,” McKeown said. “As an institution, we have moved deliberately and strategically towards expanding education abroad over the past decade, embedding it well into the curriculum of all four schools and colleges, creating more experiential programs abroad, research and service opportunities, and ways for our faculty to teach and lead students abroad in every discipline where there is interest. This represents a further growth opportunity that we are ready for as a campus.”

The college has sent students to 40 countries the past seven years, from Argentina to United Kingdom, from Mexico to China.

“We recently made the top 10 list nationally (in Institute of International Education’s Open Doors report) for master’s level study abroad enrollments, regularly are at or near the top rank for SUNY comprehensive college study abroad enrollments, and were cited by the Middle States reaccreditation team for our international programs,” McKeown said.

The Institute of International Education found in its annual study conducted with the State Department’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs that with 295,000 students in credit and non-credit programs abroad in 2011-12, less than 10 percent of U.S. college students participate.

“Globalization has changed the way the world works, and employers are increasingly looking for workers who have international skills and expertise,” said Allan Goodman, president of the institute. “Studying abroad must be viewed as an essential component of a college degree and critical to preparing future leaders.”

Rice Creek lists spring programs

Submitted by SUNY Oswego

SUNY Oswego’s Rice Creek Field Station has unveiled its spring lineup of free nature education programs on Saturdays, including naturalist-led walks, story hours and hands-on science activities.

Rice Creek Rambles beckon the public to the field station’s 400 acres of mixed terrain for guided walks at 11 a.m. Saturday, April 5 and May 10.

“Spring Awakenings” on April 5 will give walkers a chance to observe new appearances in the forests, fields and wetlands as seasons change. “Birds, Bugs and Blooms” will await walkers on May 10.

Call 312-6677 to check trail conditions on the morning of each hike.

The ways of wildlife will engage children at 11 a.m. Saturday, April 26 and May 31, for Rice Creek Story Hour.

“Rainbow Crow” on April 26 will relate the Lenape legend with beautiful illustrations and a lesson of service to others. On May 31, “The Salamander Room” will capture young imaginations while demonstrating what living things need to survive.

The field station will feature Sharing Science at 11 a.m. on three other Saturdays, April 12, May 3 and May 17.

“Composting Fundamentals” will help attendees sort out whether they need a bin, a pile or a tumbler to put such things as kitchen scraps and yard waste to good use in a healthy compost pile. Visitors can hear about Rice Creek’s three-bin system and share their own composting tips.

On May 3, the family-oriented “Wildlife Games and Activities” will present a fun-filled session featuring hands-on activities from Project Wild and other sources that simulate key natural concepts and stewardship of resources.

The May 17 “Rain Gardens” presentation will cover this new edition at Rice Creek and the many functions such gardens serve.

Since program size is limited, the field station is unable to accommodate groups. An adult needs to accompany children.

Visitors may tour the new headquarters of Rice Creek — the 7,200-square-foot, energy-efficient field station — during building hours, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday to Friday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.

Trails are open for hiking during daylight hours at Rice Creek Field Station; the entrance is on Thompson Road about a mile south of State Route 104.

For information, visit www.oswego.edu/ricecreek or call 312-6677.