Category Archives: Arts & Entertainment

Interactive exhibition opens with reception Oct. 18 in Oswego

Submitted by SUNY Oswego

SUNY Oswego will open an interactive exhibition of digital-print artist Cara Brewer Thompson’s work with a free public reception from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 18, at Tyler Art Gallery.

Thompson, a member of the college’s art department faculty, will give a talk at 6 p.m. about her display, titled “Wisdom() & Other Things,” of digital-imagery-inspired drawings that explore “soft, hard-to-define pockets of consciousness.”

“Many of the images are influenced by spirit photography, light, shadow and dusk,” she wrote in an artist’s statement. “Much of the imagery deals with vastness and silence. Physical expanse gives birth to mental stillness, silence, quiet and rest.”

The exhibition will run through Nov. 9, in tandem with an annual exhibition of the recent work of other full- and part-time members of the art faculty.

Thompson, who has taught traditional and digital media at SUNY Oswego since 2004 and more than 20 years in all, noted that her exhibition will have an interactive component.

“Randomness has always intrigued me as a creative trigger. My current drawings are inspired by quick glimpses of imagery (partially displayed photographs) that are seen for a matter of seconds,” she wrote. “I work quickly to capture what I can before the imagery is ‘taken away.’ I’ve tried to create this experience with an interactive piece called ‘Draw This.’ This invites the audience to create traditional drawings using random, timed digital prompts.”

Thompson explained that Wisdom() is a body of generative postcards, created using computer code.

“The Wisdom() software randomly selects parts of iconic philosophical writings and generates postcards from them,” she wrote.

Faculty exhibition

Twenty-five artists have been invited to display their work in the companion exhibition of art faculty work in a variety of media, including ceramics, digital media, drawing, graphic design, painting, photography, printmaking and sculpture.

“This annual exhibition allows our gallery audience to catch up with the art faculty’s latest creative developments,” said Michael Flanagan, director of Tyler Art Gallery. “Often their works are shown around the globe but rarely in Oswego. Having the faculty all together in a single exhibition can also foster a sense of camaraderie within the department as a whole.”

Tyler Art Gallery is open 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays when the college is in session. Parking is $1 for those without a SUNY Oswego parking sticker; see www.oswego.edu/administration/parking for more information.

Anthony Joseph Swingtet performs Oct. 18 at Under the Moon

The Anthony Joseph Swingtet will be the first featured performer Oct. 18 at Under the Moon.

The band will perform from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. as Under The Moon launches “Under The Moon: Where The Stars Come Out” live cabaret entertainment and dining, said co-owners Bill and Karen Hubel.

Under the Moon is located directly beneath Blue Moon Grill, also owned by the Hubels, in Fulton’s Canal Landing.

“We will have a full bar and table service featuring our special Tapas menu,” said Bill Hubel. “There is no cover charge and reservations are welcome, but not necessary.

“We anticipate a very enthusiastic response to this opportunity to enjoy soft, intimate live music in Under The Moon’s warm ambiance,” he said.

The Anthony Joseph Swingtet has become especially popular among jazz enthusiasts who appreciate the refreshing new energy the group brings to various classic jazz standards and ballads that have stood the test of time.

The group was among the featured performers at the 2013 Fulton Jazz Festival and they appeared Under The Moon as part of two benefit performances that preceded the Fulton Jazz Festival.

The Swingtet’s 2007 CD was recorded as a trio and received a 2008 SAMMY Award nomination.

The Swingtet performers for Under The Moon are: Anthony Joseph, clarinet and vocals; Bill Palange, trombone; Tom Bronzetti, guitar; and Dave Welsch, acoustic bass.

The group provides the listener with a ‘swingin’ sound that is smooth, sweet, and in the groove. Usually performing as a small combo (trio, quartet or quintet), the group has been described as providing a ‘chamber music-like jazz setting, creating a pleasant atmosphere that is comfortable for the listener to enjoy the music.’

It is also quite obvious that the band genuinely enjoys performing and will naturally develop a friendly rapport with their audience.

“Tony Joseph is a master at connecting with his audience through both music and conversation,” Bill Hubel said.

For more information, contact Karen or Bill Hubel at 598-4770.

Sewing classes offered for National Sewing Month

September as National Sewing Month is the perfect connection for CNY Arts Center to offer a return to the basics of sewing for a new generation.

Sew You Can classes for ages 6-18 start Saturday, Sept. 28 and run throughout the fall at the Arts Center location at 357 State St. Methodist Church through the Park St entrance in Fulton.

Students will learn how to use a sewing machine, know all the parts of the machine and learn basic stitches.

Each class will create a project and receive a special patch on completion of training. Creative sewing classes with individual sewing projects will be open to those students who have completed training on the sewing machines.

The observance of National Sewing Month began in 1982 with a proclamation from President Ronald Reagan declaring September as National Sewing Month “in recognition of the importance of home sewing to our Nation.”

Subsequent proclamations signed by President Reagan state that “tens of millions of Americans sew at home. Their efforts demonstrate the industry, the skill and the self-reliance which are so characteristic of this Nation.”

Citing the creative, “therapeutic and calming effects of sewing” at NationalSewingMonth.org, the annual observance is a national effort to sustain the art of sewing in all its many forms with a belief that sewing reduces stress in adults and gives kids a creative edge.

“Since sewing is no longer taught in schools as a basic skill, these classes meet a need for learning and experience many children, and adults, do not have access to,” said Nancy Fox, executive director. “This sewing class series for kids will empower them for a lifetime with the skills they learn and take with them.”

“The art of sewing is a satisfying and limitless skill within the reach of everyone from the basic sewing on a button to creating individual and imaginative works of art. Fiber arts are an exciting part of the textile industry with many new textures and fabrics and threads. Sewing quickly becomes a passion.”

From sewing to culinary to painting, drawing or writing, CNY Arts Center offers all arts for all ages. “Our fall calendar is a feast of options for every artistic palette,” Fox continues. “We look for classes that meet the need for every skill level and interest.”

For more information and to register for classes, visit www.CNYArtsCenter.com or call 592-3373.

SUNY Oswego troupe takes to stage in Scotland

Six students and two theater faculty members from State University College at Oswego participated in August in the world’s largest performing arts festival, taking their production of “Desdemona, A Play About a Handkerchief” to the stages and streets of Edinburgh, Scotland.

The Edinburgh Fringe Festival — a monthlong kaleidoscope of more than 2,100 theater, music, dance and comedy productions — drew the SUNY Oswego troupe for a jam-packed 11-day trip.

“It was really inspiring,” said Joan Hart Willard, adjunct instructor of theater and director for the college’s production of the Paula Vogel play.

“The most valuable part for the students was they learned they were competing with these different professional (and other college) actors, and it takes a very strong commitment to go out and do your best all the time. It’s hard work, but it pays off,” she said.

Dana Ernest (Desdemona), Robin Rubeo (Emilia), Clare Bawarski (Bianca) and stage manager Kelly McMenemon, backstage and props manager Carlos Clemenz and lighting director Tyler Eldred made the trip with theater chair and professor Jessica Hester and Willard.

An “Othello” spinoff, “Desdemona” played in SUNY Oswego’s lab theater in March.

The troupe left Aug. 1, stayed at the University of Edinburgh and could walk to the festival’s stages and “the Royal Mile” (High Street) where they did two 20-minute performances — a traditional form of promotion known as busking — and handed out postcards inviting passersby to their four productions in Surgeons Hall, one of six theaters collectively known as The Space.

“It was a lot of fun,” Willard said. “They are a great group of students, very mature and responsible. They were real troupers.”

Competitors from some other colleges around the world produced homegrown plays, another object lesson for the Oswego group.

“If you want to make a living doing this profession, you sometimes have to plan the production, find the money and do it yourself,” Willard said.

Research and funding

The road to Edinburgh was paved with research, planning and funding.

“I took a theater group from Syracuse University years ago and it was a very positive experience,” said Willard, who is also a playwright and actor.

She spoke about the idea a couple of years ago with Hester, who journeyed to Edinburgh for the festival last year during the international college competition.

Hester returned and started writing grant applications, receiving support from the International College Theater Festival as well as numerous on-campus resources. She said the effort was well worth it in terms of educational value for the students.

“They were able to perform in the largest performing arts festival in the world,” Hester said. “They saw so many different types of performances from so many countries, their understanding of what theater can be has expanded far beyond their experiences in New York. It was literally a life- and career-changing experience.”

Quilting in the woods weekend retreat starts Oct. 11

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Oswego County announces the eighth annual Quilting in the Woods Retreat to be held at the Amboy 4-H Environmental Education Center.

This retreat will begin at 6 p.m. Oct. 11 and run through noon Oct. 13.

Whether a participant is an experienced quilter who has been making quilts for years or is just discovering the rewards of quilting, this retreat is perfect.

It’s packed full of great projects, quilting instruction, good food and lots of fun.

Saturday evening is social time with games and prizes. Participants will make new friends while spending the weekend quilting with people who share the same interests and love for quilting.

Workshops for the weekend include: Trade Winds (pinwheel), Piece of Cake, Zig a Zag table-runner or bed scarf from Quilt in a Day; and Take Five Quilts the Takes a Tumble pattern.

The weekend will end on Sunday with a mini-workshop including continuous bias binding, and measuring for borders.

Quilting in the Woods Retreat also includes a break from the sewing machine with a nature walk on the trails at Amboy with an environmental educator.

If they are unable to attend the whole weekend, quilters can attend individual workshops. Registration deadline with payment is Sept. 23. Materials lists will be sent after registration and payment are received.

For more information, or to register,  call the Oswego County 4-H office at 963-7286, ext. 302 or email mmm65@cornell.edu.

Please contact the office if you have any special needs.

What’s Happening at CNY Arts Center?

September’s off and running with our third annual outdoor Arts Market 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 14 with nearly 50 vendors in the old Nestle parking lot.

Shoppers will find original handmade art, crafts, vintage items, yard sale treasures, Christmas gifts and a great shopping experience with plenty of room to stroll among the vendors in Fulton’s largest outdoor market.

Drama Club for seventh- and eighth- graders begins Sept. 16, meeting Mondays and Wednesdays from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the Arts Center.

This great new activity is free and open to all seventh- and eighth-grade students in the area regardless of school or home school affiliation. A commitment to the entire 10 weeks is the only requirement.

This group will work throughout the fall to develop a new theater group for teens with a production scheduled for mid-November. The club will meet at CNY Arts Center at State Street United Methodist Church.

Auditions for the Christmas production of Little Women will take place 6 to 8 p.m. Sept. 19, from noon to 3 p.m. Sept. 21 and 6 to 8 p.m. Sept. 24 at the Arts Center.

Ages 15 and older are invited to audition for the beloved classic, which will premiere Dec. 13 to 22.  For more information about the production, visit CNYArtsCenter.com.

Kids Onstage for all kids ages 7 to 18 will start Sept. 21 and meet from 5 to 7 p.m. for eight Saturdays at the Arts Center.

This drama class will develop skills and techniques for stage presence, creative problem solving, team building, and character development.

Children who complete Kids Onstage classes will be allowed to audition for the spring all youth production. Kids Onscreen will start in early October. This is the great film class where kids develop a short script that is filmed and edited by the class instructor.

More new classes on tap for the fall include sewing classes for all skill levels,  popular culinary adventures, a writing critique workshop and capturing memories in story and in collage; story time art, oil painting, pumpkin carving and more all take place at the center in the church.

Get all the latest news and updates at CNYArtsCenter.com. Students are reminded to pre-register for all classes and workshops to avoid missing out.

Classes and workshops charge a modest fee. Visit CNYArtsCenter.com for more information or call 592-3373 for details and updates.

Remember, we bring all arts for all ages at two separate locations. Classes, Writer’s Café, Author Spotlight, live theater and Arty Camp are held in CNY Arts Center located in the lower level of State Street United Methodist Church, 357 State St., Fulton.

Arts in the HeART Gallery is located at 47 S. First St. in downtown Fulton across from the gazebo for local artists who want to display their artistry. Artists can apply for gallery space online at CNYArtsCenter.com.

Writing class focuses on school memories

The river’s end bookstore in Oswego is offering the next in its series of programs for writers and those interested in becoming writers.

“School Days, School Ways: Recalling How and What We Learned” will explore the memories we have related to our school years: favorite teachers, best friends, embarrassing classroom moments, first crushes, etc.

The class begins Sept. 12.

“We have so much emotion stemming from our school years,” said Jim Farfaglia, writing instructor.

“It was a time when our minds and bodies were rapidly developing and we were learning new things — both in and out of the classroom,” he said. “By tapping into our school-related memories, we can discover how those years continue to inform who we are today — and we can have a little fun remembering.”

Class time will be spent participating in activities to rekindle memories and inspire writing.

Each week, the class will focus on a different aspect of school and participants will have the opportunity to share the stories they have written. No previous writing experience is necessary.

The class will be held at the bookstore, West Second and Bridge streets in Oswego, and will run for six Thursdays, beginning Sept. 12 and continuing through Oct. 17.

Class time will run from 6 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. There is a fee for the class.

For more information, or to register, contact the river’s end bookstore at 342-0077, or visit Farfaglia’s website at jimfarfaglia.weebly.com and click on “Writing Classes.”

Calling all amateur ham radio operators

Fulton Amateur Radio Club is pleased to announce another free amateur radio entry level technician course starting 7 p.m. Sept. 16 in the County Building, Fulton, across from Mimi’s.

The only cost to students will be the purchase of the study guide.

The technician class license is designed for beginning level hams. This is where you will open the door and go inside to the exciting world of Ham Radio and learn more about Amateur Radio as you progress. It authorizes you all ham radio privileges above 30 Megahertz (MHz).

1500 watts of power and these privileges include the very popular 2-meter band. Many technician licensees enjoy using small 2-meter hand-held radios to stay in touch with other hams in their area or operate from just about any vehicle, boat, etc.

Imagine sending live TV in real time over the air or just still pictures over the air! Technician class Hams may operate FM voice, many digital modes including packet (computers), television, single-sideband voice and several other interesting modes.

As a technician class ham radio operator, you can even make international radio contacts via ham radio satellites, and actually communicate directly to hams aboard the International Space Station using relatively simple and inexpensive equipment.

Imagine the thrill of talking to the astronauts, many of whom are licensed ham radio operators, aboard the space station, talking directly to ham radio satellites in space that relay your signals to earth far beyond your horizon, or just around the block or around the world using your own licensed station and equipment!

Using the computer and ham radio, you can “talk” using your voice or the keyboard to ham friends or make new ones literally around the world using less power than a 100 watt light bulb! Hams know how to do this!

Our goal is to provide comprehensive, regular training for the ham radio community around Oswego County. We primarily conduct licensing courses, but we seek ideas for other types of training as well.

If you would like to become a licensed amateur radio operator, contact Fred Koch at 652- 8441 or Rick Boutell at 963-3814 to register.