Category Archives: Church

Members of the First United Methodist Church are pictured getting ready for the first annual Strawberry Extravaganza, which will be held Saturday, Sept. 8 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

First United Church to hold Strawberry Extravaganza

Members of the First United Methodist Church are pictured getting ready for the first annual Strawberry Extravaganza, which will be held Saturday, Sept. 8 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The First United Methodist Church of Fulton will be holding its first annual Strawberry Extravaganza Saturday, Sept. 8 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event is open to the public and there is no admission fee.

The Strawberry Extravaganza will feature food and auctions.

For the adults, there will be a silent auction, a Christmas in September booth, a Granny’s Attic and a New-To-You booth, an Avon Treasure Chest, and a Mom’s Pantry of homemade goods.

For the children, there will be a Children’s Toy Chest, bounce houses, arts and crafts, face painting, free balloons and more.

Food will include a chicken barbecue, strawberry shortcake, an ice cream “Sundae School,” popcorn and penny candy.

The First United Methodist Church of Fulton is located at 1408 N.Y.S. Rte. 176 (Curtis Street), just across from the Fulton Junior High School.

Those seeking more information, may visit www.fultonfumc.org or call the church office at 592-7347.

Light In The Darkness: August 29, 2012

by Pastor David Grey

“Our Father…” The opening words to the prayer Jesus told His disciples to pray.” – Matthew 6:9

I begin by saying a word about what we have come to know as “The Lord’s Prayer.”

It was customary for every public teacher among the Jews of Jesus’ day to compose a prayer that would also embody the doctrines that teacher considered most important. The teacher then gave that prayer to his disciples for their own use.

Some of those prayers were of considerable length and contained great detail. Often when this was the case, an outline was made from that prayer, so that one could memorize the main points upon which to base his personal, spontaneous petition to God.

Thus, the outline was not the prayer itself, but the template for prayer. The prayer that Jesus gave to His disciples is one of these. It is the outline form of the prayer Jesus gave His disciples.

We were never intended to pray only the outline but rather to pray consistent with that outline; to flesh it out as it were.

Now to my main point. What a surprise it was to the disciples when they heard Jesus tell them to pray, “Our Father.” Nothing in the scriptures to that point referred to God as one who had or desired such an intimate relationship with mankind as to be called “Father.”

The name “Father,” as applied to God in the Old Testament, nearly always referred to God as the father of the nation of Israel and never by someone referring to Him as “my Father.”

To read the rest of the story, subscribe to The Valley News by calling 315-598-6397

Light In The Darkness: August 22, 2012

by Pastor David Grey

“I will sing of Your power;  Yes, I will sing aloud of Your mercy in the morning;  For You have been my defense and refuge in the day of my trouble. To You, O my Strength, I will sing praises; For God is my defense, My God of mercy.” – Psalm 59:16-17

It is good to meditate upon the mercy of God — the mercy He extends to all who humbly acknowledge their need. For it is through His great mercy that we experience His gentle, loving touch.

The touch that heals the broken hearted and binds our wounds, whether self-inflicted or caused by others. It is a great mercy.

Charles Spurgeon wrote, “There is nothing little in God; His mercy is like Himself — it is infinite. You cannot measure it. His mercy is so great that it forgives great sins to great sinners, after great lengths of time, and then gives great favors and great privileges, and raises us up to great enjoyments in the great heaven of the great God.”

Mercy is by definition, of course, totally unmerited. The sinner has no right whatever to the kindness of the Most High. It is death that is the wages of his sin. That is the only thing men have earned.

Mercy is that great and wonderful gift the Father bestows upon those who recognize the justice of those wages and mourn that they can of themselves do nothing about them. Mercy is a gift both rich and unfailing.

It is a mercy that will never leave us nor forsake us. It is a mercy that during times of temptation gives strength to stand firm.

 To read the rest of the column, subscribe to The Valley News by calling 315-598-6397

Church to hold school supply giveaway

The Trinity United Methodist Church in Oswego will be holding a school supply giveaway Saturday, Aug. 25 from 10 a.m. until supplies are exhausted.

The church is requesting that children be in attendance and that they have their class supply lists with them.

Supplies will be on a first-come, first-served basis. The church will be focusing on the elementary grade lists only.

Trinity United Methodist Church is located at 45 E. Utica St., Oswego.

Those seeking more information may call the church at 343-1715.

Light In The Darkness: August 15, 2012

by Pastor David Grey

“Lord knows how to rescue godly men from trials and to hold the unrighteous for the day of judgment.” 2 Peter 2:9

Last week my column was on the reality and joys of heaven. I would much rather write about heaven every week than to do so on the realities of hell and eternal punishment. However, in recent years the topic of hell has not only been  neglected but it would seem purposely avoided in far too many churches, and scripture says that both are very real places.

The time to learn that there is a heaven seek and a hell to shun is today, while there is yet hope.  Someone simply calling himself,  “The email Preacher” nailed this departure from the truth about hell when he wrote,  “If someone still believes in Hell, he is called old-fashioned, out of touch, out of step with reality, foolish and ignorant. Many appeal to rationality and reason, as they tell us that the concept of an eternal hell… is ludicrous and demeaning.

Others,  appealing to the nature of God, say that it flies in the face of everything God is to teach that He will consign some people to that awful place. Still others, turning to religion, tell us that man is capable of redeeming himself and therefore, every man is working out his own heaven and there will be hell for no one. That sounds good, but it is a lie!”

To read the rest of the column, subscribe to The Valley News by calling 315-598-6397

Bristol Hill Congregational United Church of Christ will celebrate its 200th anniversary with a tent revival Saturday, Aug. 18 from 1 to 6:45 p.m. Pictured is Pastor Andrew Hinman with his daughter, Audrey, and father Jim Hinman. Audrey holds a photo of James Seward, a free African American who joined the church in the 1800’s. His grandmother was the first member of Bristol Hill UCC, a historic church tied to the Underground Railroad.

Bristol Hill to celebrate 200 years with interdenominational event

Bristol Hill Congregational United Church of Christ will celebrate its 200th anniversary with a tent revival Saturday, Aug. 18 from 1 to 6:45 p.m. Pictured is Pastor Andrew Hinman with his daughter, Audrey, and father Jim Hinman. Audrey holds a photo of James Seward, a free African American who joined the church in the 1800’s. His grandmother was the first member of Bristol Hill UCC, a historic church tied to the Underground Railroad.

by Nicole Reitz

Bristol Hill Congregational United Church of Christ will celebrate its 200th anniversary with a tent revival and chicken barbecue Saturday, Aug. 18 from 1 to 6:45 p.m.

“Our congregations’ history speaks of revivals during the mid-1800s, which people would come from all around for days to participate and enjoy in each other’s fellowship and various ways to celebrate God,” said Pastor Andrew Hinman.

“When the church first started out in 1812, denomination wasn’t an issue,” Hinman added. “The people who came together all believed in God. For our event, we wanted to scrap the denominational differences and just celebrate each others different styles and customs.”

The event begins at 1 p.m. with an opening by Hinman. At 1:30 p.m., there will be a piano accordion performance by Janet Carp of Palermo United Methodist Church.

At 2 p.m., youth minister Christopher Green of the Fulton Nazarence Church will speak. At 3 p.m. Pastors Willie and Eva Mitchell of the Christ Cultivating Community Church of Syracuse will preach with their praise dancers.

Evangelist Gene Addison will speak at 4 p.m. Addison has brought the word of God to people around the world, and has recorded his testimonials on CDs.

Brian Pribis of Fulton Alliance Church is slated at 5 p.m. while Les and Linda Green will minister at 5:30 p.m. The Greens perform each year in over 200 churches, preaching and singing the news of Jesus in a variety of musical styles.

Bristol Hill started in the 1800s as a Presbyterian church and over the years, the church has seen a change in the make up of the congregation.

Two hundred years ago, when church was the center of Volney’s social life, there were several parishioners from large farm families.

“The church was the center of society at the time,” said Jim Hinman, a former pastor at Bristol Hill. “In the old records, it tells of people getting excommunicated for not coming to church. Now, you don’t hear of people getting excommunicated. We just pray that they join us.”

Hinman explained how the church was once surrounded by houses, which created more of a centralized community in Volney. Bristol Hill now has an average of 32 people, who live in Oswego, Phoenix, Fulton and Mexico.

To read the rest of the story, subscribe to The Valley News by calling 315-598-6397

First United Church of Fulton to present outdoor movie

The 2011 family film “Dolphin Tale” will be featured at an outdoor movie event at Open Doors Neighborhood Center at First United Church of Fulton Friday, Aug. 17 at 8:30 p.m. The movie is free.

The film will be shown on a screen outside in the parking lot of the church, which is located at 33 S. Third St.

Those attending are encouraged to bring lawn chairs and blankets for the viewing. If it rains, the movie will be viewed inside.

The church and its Open Doors Neighborhood Center is showing the film with permission through CVLI. It is an opportunity for the community to have access to a free movie and enjoy the mild summer weather.

“We think this will be a fun evening,” said Pastor Rev. David Nethercott. “We do hope people will take advantage of a n opportunity for a free movie and a time of fellowship.”

Popcorn and beverages will be served.

“Dolphin Tale” is a 2011 family drama film directed by Charles Martin Smith from screenplay by Karen Janszen and Noam Dromi and a book of the same name.

The film stars Harry Connick, Jr., Ashley Judd and Morgan Freeman. The book and film are inspired by the true story of Winter, a bottlenose dolphin that was rescued in December 2005 off the Florida coast and taken in by the Clearwater Marine Aquarium. Winter lost her tail after becoming entangled with a rope attached to a crab trap and was fitted with a prosthetic one.

The Open Doors Neighborhood Center, which has teams that focus on families as well as older adults, opened in October of 2011 in hopes of offering the community a safe place to gather to make friends and learn new things.

Carol Dexter, president of the center’s board, explained that the center continues to work with neighbors and school groups to find out the best ways to meet the needs of the neighborhood and community.

All Saints Episcopal Church to hold festival

All Saints Episcopal Church will celebrate its anniversary with a community festival in September.

The church, which has been located for its entire existence at the corner of South First and Academy streets, will hold the festival from Friday, Sept. 14 to Sunday, Sept. 16.

Members of the festival committee are reaching out to all of Fulton’s churches, civic groups and the public to join the celebration. Any legitimate group may have space for a booth to offer arts, crafts, food, activities, information, displays and more.

Booths are free and will be available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Church officials only ask that groups taking a booth consider making a donation to the church in return for the space, especially for those booths selling products.

Proceeds from the festival will support the church’s programs and outreach, including it’s successful Tuesday Night dinner program, which offers a free meal to members of the community.

The dinner program has served thousands of meals in its three-year existence. It operates on volunteer labor, donations and grants.

The event will also feature rides from Ontario Amusements. Tours of the historic church are planned. Tours of the church will include history, historic windows, organ and carillon.

The carillon chimed 175 times Jan. 15 to begin the church’s anniversary celebration. The year has also been marked by a rededication of the church. With Bishop Gladstone “Skip” Adams in attendance, a joyous event marked Rev. Harold Avery’s 60th anniversary of his Episcopalian ordination.

Still to come is a dinner and special Sunday service on the weekend of Nov. 3-4.

Zion, the name of the first Episcopal church in Fulton, was changed to All Saints November 7, 1915. According to the Liturgical Calendar, All Saints Sunday is the Sunday following Nov. 1, All Saints Day.

Those seeking additional information may call Sonja Shoen-Delong at 378-3744, Marilou Santoro at 343-0172 or Lynn Bullard at 598-9535.