All posts by Debbie Groom

Nine Mile 2 out of service for refueling

Operators removed Nine Mile Point Unit 2 from service at about 12:30 a.m. today to begin the station’s planned refueling outage.

During the outage, Constellation Energy Nuclear Group employees and more than 1,200 supplemental workers will perform more than 2,000 maintenance activities, tests and safety inspections on a variety of plant components and systems. Many of the activities performed during the outage cannot be accomplished while the unit is operational and all are designed to ensure the continued safe, efficient and reliable production of electricity.

“The safe, reliable operation of Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station is always our top priority,” said site vice president Chris Costanzo. “We’re also proud to stimulate our community’s economy by bringing to the area so many supplemental workers who will support local businesses.”

In addition to replacing nearly one third of the reactor’s fuel, outage workers will be performing a host of equipment enhancements and modifications while the unit is offline. Nine Mile’s two units are on a 24-month refueling cycle. Efficient completion of this necessary work, combined with longer operating cycles, helps the customer by optimizing nuclear energy’s benefits as a reliable source of emissions-free electricity.

 

Brindsley “Brin” McCann, retired from Sealright

Brindsley “Brin” McCann, 85, died Friday March 21, 2014 in University Hospital, Syracuse.

Mr. McCann was born in Volney, the son of Myron and Gertrude McCann.

Mr. McCann worked for Sealright Co. for 45 years before his retirement.

He served in the United States Army from 1950 until 1952.

He was a member of the Volney seniors and a communicant of Sacred Heart Church.

Mr. McCann was predeceased by his wife Mary F. McCann in 2014, and his siblings Fred, Richard, Maurice, Donald, Worden, Louis McCann and Eileen Mileskey, Dorothy Miller, Eleanor Lachut, and Gertrude Craw.

He is survived by several nieces and nephews.

Spring burial will be in New Haven Cemetery. There are no calling hours. The arrangements are in the care of the Sugar Funeral Home, 224 W. Second St. S., Fulton.

Veteran of the Year to be Fulton’s Memorial Day Parade Grand Marshal

Each fall, the Fulton Veterans’ Council chooses a Veteran of the Year from among the membership of several Fulton veterans’ organizations. This year, Jim Weinhold, center, was named Veteran of the Year and is seen with Fulton Mayor Ron Woodward (right) and Memorial Day Salute Chairman Larry Macner (left). Weinhold will be the Grand Marshal for the Memorial Day Salute Parade May 24. The parade is sponsored by the Fulton Lions, Kiwanis, Rotary and Sunrise Rotary service clubs, in cooperation with the Fulton Veteran’s Council.
Each fall, the Fulton Veterans’ Council chooses a Veteran of the Year from among the membership of several Fulton veterans’ organizations. This year, Jim Weinhold, center, was named Veteran of the Year and is seen with Fulton Mayor Ron Woodward (right) and Memorial Day Salute Chairman Larry Macner (left). Weinhold will be the Grand Marshal for the Memorial Day Salute Parade May 24. The parade is sponsored by the Fulton Lions, Kiwanis, Rotary and Sunrise Rotary service clubs, in cooperation with the Fulton Veteran’s Council.

Jim Weinhold, of Fulton, has been named Veteran of the Year and will be the grand marshal of Fulton’s Memorial Day Salute Parade May 24.

Weinhold, 83, has lived in Fulton for 31 years, coming here from Seneca Knolls outside Baldwinsville.

He is on his fourth year as commander of the Fulton VFW, is past commander of the Fulton American Legion, is a member of the Fulton Veterans’ Council and is captain of the VFW Color Guard, which presides at military funerals in the area.

Weinhold said he served seven years in the Navy and 15 years in the Air National Guard with the 174th “Boys from Syracuse.”

From 1953 to 1954, he served on a Navy ship near the 38th parallel just off Korea as the Korean War was winding down.

He was a radarman and petty officer third class in the Navy.

In the Air Guard, he was in the supply field and retired as a master sergeant.

Weinhold worked for Western Electric for years and after retiring, worked as a custodian for the Fulton school district at G. Ray Bodley High School, Volney Elementary School and the Education Center.

“I am very humbled to be named Veteran of the Year. I’m very appreciative,” he said. “This is not just about me, but about all veterans alive and deceased.”

The first Maple Weekend is this coming weekend

By Debra J. Groom

This coming Saturday and Sunday are the days to get out and visit area maple syrup producers.

It’s the first of two Maple Weekends, in which many producers open their operations so visitors can see how maple syrup is produced. Many also have pancake breakfasts so folks can taste that sweet nectar of the maple tree and have products people can buy.

So far this season, the weather hasn’t been ideal. There were a few days a couple of weeks ago that were warm enough for the sap to run. But then it got cold again.

“We’re scared,” said Kim Enders, who runs Red Schoolhouse Maple in Palermo. “We just boiled for the first time yesterday (Thursday March 13) but we didn’t make any syrup. We haven’t been able to get a string of good days in a row to get sap.”

Maple producers need temperatures during the day in the 40s and lows in the 20s to get a good sap flow. It has just been too darn cold for the sap to flow for a good number of consecutive days.

The temperatures for this week are OK for a four-day stretch in Onondaga County, but cooler in Oswego County, which means it is iffy how much sap will flow this week.

Some producers, like Timothy Whitens who runs Willow Creek Farm of just outside Fulton in the town of Granby, said he did get enough sap to make syrup in late February when there were four days of 40 degree temperatures.

“That first weekend, I made about 75 gallons, mostly medium amber,” Whitens said. “The sap ran again Monday and Tuesday (March 10 and 11) and I was able to make more.”

Feb. 19-23 all had temperatures of 40 or higher during the day and cold nights. But on Feb. 24, it got brutally cold again and shut off the taps.

While the temperatures this year have be too cold, in 2012, it was the opposite problem.

The weather during maple season began fine in January. But by early February, temperatures rose into the 50s. In mid-March, when sap should still be flowing and syrup would normally still be made, temperatures hit near 70.

Cornell University officials said the average temperature for the first 50 days of winter in Central New York is usually 24 degrees. In 2012, it was 32 degrees, the second warmest since 1950.

Anothr problem for maple producers in the Tug Hill area has been the amount of snow. Helen Thomas, executive director of the New York State Maple Producers Association, said with more than 300 inches of snow in some places, producers were having a difficult time getting to their lines and taps.

Enders said she hopes to have enough maple products to sell and offer for tasting during Maple Weekend. Red Schoolhouse Maple is open both days of the weekends, March 22 and 23 and March 29 and 30, and offers pancake breakfast, tours of the sugarbush and boiling area and tastings.

Whitens is open only Sunday, March 23 and March 30, and offers tours.

Maple Weekend hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Go to http://www.nysmaple.com/mapleweekend/ or www.mapleweekend.com for more information.

Fulton hockey overcomes adjustments

By Rob Tetro

Scholastic hockey season has ended and the Fulton team and coach Todd Terpening are reflecting on what happened in 2014.

Terpening said his team struggled to close out games this season and ended with a 2-18-1 record. Despite its struggles, Fulton’s seniors refused to give up.

In the six or seven tight games the Red Raiders had this season, it was the efforts of their seniors which allowed Fulton opportunities to clinch wins.

Terpening said the determination his seniors showed this season made them positive role models for Fulton’s younger players

“I hope that the underclassmen can take from the Seniors is to never give up no matter how bad things may look!” Terpening said.

With the conclusion of the season, Fulton says goodbye to four seniors: Eric Forderkonz, Matt Billion, Seth Delisle and Brandon Ladd.

As Forderkonz, Billion, DeLisle and Ladd move on to the next stage of their lives, Terpening hopes they do so understanding the importance of being prepared to work hard with dedication, no matter what a situation presents them. He feels his four seniors showed up for every practice and game ready to leave it all on the ice.

Terpening said the work ethic these athletes have shown will benefit them down the road, whether it’s in college or in the workforce.

Despite the teams’ record, he also hopes that the experience of playing high school hockey was a positive one for his seniors.

This season, the Red Raiders overcame the adjustments that came with welcoming nine new players from three other school districts. However, Terpening said the future is bright for his relatively young team. In fact, he suggests that it may not be very long until his team is stronger and more unified.

“I am very excited about the team that we have returning next year!” Terpening said.

The nine players from three different school districts who joined the Fulton varsity hockey team this season are: Landon VanAlstine, Bryce Phillips and Nicholas Meyer from Red Creek; Stanley Kubis, Eric Forderkonz, Austin Forte, Rocco Cannata and Seth Cooney from Central Square; and Spencer Evans from Phoenix.

Phoenix hoops finish successful season

By Rob Tetro

The Phoenix boys’ varsity basketball team recently concluded its season with an 11-8 record and having earned a second place finish in league play.

Four seniors also wrapped up their hoops career at Phoenix. As Nick Tassone, Emilio Tassone, Bryce Plante, Jeff Sawyer and Brandon Wood depart, they do so having made their impact felt on the Phoenix boys’ basketball program.

Coach Jim Rose sais his four seniors worked hard to improve from game to game and season to season. After failing to qualify for Sectional playoffs last season, the seniors and their work ethic were on display this season.

In fact, the work ethic seemed to have trickled down to the team’s younger players.The Firebirds worked hard to improve throughout the season, which put them in position to win more games than a year ago en route to returning to during the Sectional playoffs.

With Nick and Emilio Tassone, Plante and Sawyer set to graduate, Rose hopes they move from their participation in the Phoenix boys’ varsity basketball program having learned the importance of responsibility and hard work in a team setting.

Rose said a successful unit is one that is cohesive, which allows that unit to work together for common goals.

Phoenix accomplished many goals this season.Rose is proud his seniors will be able to move on after being a part of a team that succeeded while working together in a family atmosphere.

Rose also hopes his younger players move on from this season having learned as much from the seniors work ethic and dedication as it seems they have. This season, they were able to see firsthand how hard work and dedication during both the in-season and off-season can benefit a team.

He also hopes his returning players quickly regroup and renew or expand their determination with the expectation of building on the success from this season.

Looking ahead, two starters will be returning for the Firebirds next season. The team will also feature two key bench players from this year’s team.

Strong leadership will be expected from Zach Sisera next year as a senior. Also as a senior, Connor Haney will be looking to improve at the center position next season.

Walker Connoly and Shaun Turner came off the bench last season, but will be looked upon to fill the voids left behind that this year’s group of seniors. Rose hopes to see the trend of hard work, dedication and improvement trickling down to the program’a younger players continuing.

He said having players who work hard and have the success to show for it will be great examples for new players who lack basketball experience at the varsity level.

Poetry Corner

March Madness, by Jim Farfaglia

 

Somebody above missed the message

that winter’s officially done;

the white stuff keeps fallin’,

the big trucks keep plowin’

and nobody’s having much fun.

 

We’ve had enough of skiing,

of sledding and cute snowmen;

still the temperature ain’t risin’,

and golfers are agonizin’

over when they’ll see green grass again.

 

I’d be happy to deliver the word

if I could just find Mr. Sun.

It sure would be pleasin’,

if we had a new season;

here’s hoping he sends the right one!

Willy Wonka Jr. on stage again this week

 

More performances of ‘Willy Wonka Jr.’ are being presented this week.

The play is being staged at 7:30 p.m. March 21 and 3 p.m. March 22 and 23. CNY Arts Center presents the children’s musical as part of its Kids Onstage program at 357 State St. Methodist Church, in Fulton (use the Park Street entrance).

For tickets and reservations visit www.CNYArtsCenter.com or call 592-3373.