All posts by Debbie Groom

Repeal of SAFE Act fails in Assembly

Assemblyman Will Barclay, R-Pulaski, reported today that the Assembly has failed to repeal the SAFE Act, the gun control law that went into effect in 2013. .

Here is his statement:   “The Majority controlled Assembly Codes Committee stopped all efforts to repeal the SAFE Act this week. They ensured that this repeal would not make it to the floor for a full Assembly vote. The message was clear: they do not care about our right to bear arms or the questionable constitutionality of the SAFE Act,” said Barclay. “Instead, our laws remain unnecessarily hostile toward law-abiding citizens. It was my hope that we could have at least changed more aspects of the law this session if a complete repeal was not possible. Unfortunately, those efforts too were stopped short in committee. With Remington (Arms, a gun factory in Ilion, Herkimer County) choosing to expand out of New York, this ill-conceived SAFE Act proved bad for gun owners as well as our economy.”

 

Want to run for Phoenix school board? Get those petitions out now

Submitted by Oswego County BOCES

The Phoenix Central School District is accepting petitions for the board of education.

There are three seats open for election during the vote on May 20. The seats hold three-year terms and there is no salary.

The incumbents are Paul Gilchriest, Debbie St. Phillips and Keith Watkins.

Petitions to nominate candidates for the school board election can be obtained from the District Clerk’s office, located at the 116 Volney St., Phoenix.

Petitions must be signed by at least 25 qualified voters of the Phoenix Central School District and must state the name and address of the candidate. Residential address of each signer must also be provided.

The petitions must be filed with the District Clerk’s office no later than 5 p.m. Monday, April 21. The budget vote and elections will take place May 20.

Astrophysics symposium April 25-26 at SUNY Oswego

Submitted by SUNY Oswego

SUNY Oswego will host the “Astrophysics for the New Century” symposium April 25-26, featuring a keynote speech on computational astrophysics by a University of Rochester faculty member.

Dr. Adam Frank, assistant professor of physics and astronomy, will deliver a free, public talk at 7:15 p.m. Friday, April 25, in Sheldon Hall ballroom.

With interests at the intersection of astrophysical fluid dynamics, stellar evolution and supercomputer simulations, Frank will speak about his research in hypersonic outflows in stellar environments, which produce “some of the most beautiful structures in the night sky,” he said.

“Much of my work to date has focused on the origin and evolution of these outflows,” Frank said. “Currently my group is working to understand the formation of ‘bipolar’ (double-lobed) outflows at the extremes of stellar evolution.”

In addition to his research and teaching, Frank is a freelance science journalist with articles in Discover and Astronomy magazines.

Parking for Frank’s talk is available in the employee and commuter lots adjacent to and across Washington Boulevard from Sheldon Hall.

The symposium is a joint meeting of the state section of the American Physical Society and the Astronomical Society of New York.

For more information, contact physics professors Shashi Kanbur, shashi.kanbur@oswego.edu, or Dale Zych, dale.zych@oswego.edu.

Bishop’s Commons celebrates 14th anniversary

Residents and staff at Bishop’s Commons in Oswego gathered recently to mark the enriched living residence’s 14th anniversary of providing care and services for seniors in the community.

A special luncheon helped mark the milestone and afforded staff and residents alike an opportunity to celebrate together.

Addressing all those gathered for the event, Executive Director Karen Murray said the most important role Bishop’s Commons has played is providing for the physical, social and emotional wellbeing of residents in a setting that allows them to continue to be a part of the community they helped build.

As part of the day’s celebration, Murray took a moment to recognize a number of residents who have called Bishop’s Commons home for some time, including one who has lived at the enriched living residence for 12 years.

“No matter how long you have been with us,” observed Murray, “It has been a privilege to get to know each of you and each has added something unique and very special to our community.”

Murray also used the occasion to present awards to a number of Bishop’s Commons staff, some having been with the enriched living residence since the doors opened in 2000.

“In our 14 year history, Bishop’s Commons has served over 400 people from across our area, said Murray.

“During this time we are fortunate to have a number of dedicated staff that have a great deal of experience with our organization; experience that certainly benefits those who call Bishop’s Commons home and certainly reflects well on our organization,” she said.

Buccaneer Bulletin launches website

Buccaneer Bulletin, the official newspaper of Oswego High School, has begun a new website.

The website is accessed at www.buccaneerbulletin.com and opened for public access April 1.

“This has been a fun collaboration between the people at iHeart Oswego and the staff at Buc Bulletin,” said Rachel Purtell, webmaster of the new Buccaneer Bulletin website.

“We wanted a site that we could access, make changes to every day and had relevancy to the student body. iHeart helped make that happen for us,” she said.

“They donated their services, expertise and time to create an up-to-date, eye appealing website that offers the flexibility we needed. Students can access a gallery of photos taken by the staff, sports and clubs announcements, lunch menus and current weather conditions.”

“In addition you will be able to view the live feed from our Facebook page.” said Editor-in-Chief Tara Stacy. “We feel the new website will give our peers instant access to our content and will allow us to better adapt to the ever-changing world of journalism.”

The website will feature both current and past issues back to 2005.  The staff wants people who are more comfortable with online reading to be able to check out the newspaper from their computer, phone or tablet.

The online version will also offer additional advertising opportunities for businesses and organizations.

For more information about the Buccaneer Bulletin, call 341-2200 and ask for Room 129 and visit us on www.BuccaneerBulletin.com.

Program put SUNY Oswego students on bikes

Submitted by SUNY Oswego

The new SUNY Oswego Bike Share program provides refurbished bicycles to students up to a semester at a time to encourage fitness and cost savings while helping cut down on car trips.

Cycling and recycling come naturally to Alex Elkins, a senior technology education major and founder of SUNY Oswego Bike Share.

He races mountain bikes on a national level, rides about 10,000 miles year-round and works in a Rochester bicycle shop, where he applies skills he needed to learn to afford racing.

“We’re going to teach basic maintenance to borrowers. To those so inclined, we’ll teach advanced maintenance,” Elkins said. “That’s a big part of sustainability, along with fitness and saving gas — you can save a lot of money fixing your own bike.”

Bike Share’s headquarters are in the basement of Hewitt Union on campus, where students can apply for one of 15 bicycles the club has ready to go.

With other two-wheelers scavenged for parts, Bike Share has received about 25 donations of used bicycles from the Oswego community, Elkins and his contacts in Rochester, University Police and other campus staff, and from roadside discards.

Contact sustainability@oswego.edu to make a donation.

SUNY Oswego Bike Share has received assistance from the college’s Facilities Design and Construction office. Graduate assistant Jason MacLeod recruited Elkins and has helped him launch the program, and campus sustainability coordinators Mike Lotito and Jamie Adams encouraged the program with new tools, repurposed space in Hewitt Union and other startup necessities.

Adams and Lotito pointed out that vehicular traffic accounts for about a third of Oswego’s contribution to greenhouse gases as a lot of people drive around campus, as well as to and from it.

“The bike-sharing program is right up there on our roadmap for strategically reducing the college’s carbon footprint, and at the same time proving health and wellness on campus,” Adams said. SUNY Oswego, through its Climate Action Plan and the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment, is pursuing strategies to reduce emissions up to 40 percent by 2020.

Elkins said Bike Share has built accountability into its program: statements of need, waivers, locks to go with each bicycle, encouragement to share the two-wheeler with others and, as experience and growth dictate, perhaps a deposit that includes a fee to help the program safeguard its investment and pay its way.

“I want to see people take responsibility for the bikes,” he said.

Elkins, who will student teach in technology this fall, said he minors in sustainability and comes by his interest in cycling through his parents, who both ride and minimize driving.

“Bike Share is right on point with what I’m interested in,” he said. “My passion is cycling and the outdoors. Why not share that in this way?”

For more information on sustainability initiatives at the college, visit www.oswego.edu/sustainability.