All posts by Debbie Groom

Hannibal girls’ track team wants Sectional championship

By Rob Tetro

The Hannibal girls’ varsity track and field team comes into the 2014 season hoping to build off of its third place finish in last season’s Section 3, B-2 Meet.

This season, Hannibal has its sights set on winning the sectional championship. However, that’s not the only goal the Lady Warriors want to accomplish this season.

Coach Dan Pawlewicz said his athletes want to see 95 percent of the Hannibal runners improve on their times. Hannibal team members also are striving to be a team recognized for what they accomplish in the classroom.

It’s also important that the Lady Warriors have solid efforts in each invitational they participate in.

A year ago, the Lady Warriors sent two athletes to the New York State Qualifying Meet. This season, Hannibal also hopes to match or expand on the number of athletes who are invited to the state qualifying meet.

However, it all goes back to being the top team in Section 3, Class B-2 for the Lady Warriors. Pawlewicz said if his team can avoid injuries and maintain its impressive work ethic, sectional supremacy may be in the cards for Hannibal.

The Lady Warriors will feature a handful of both experienced and inexperienced athletes this season. In fact, 21 of the 31 athletes are in 10th grade or younger including four eighth-graders.

However, Hannibal has two juniors and two seniors who are expected to play key roles this season. Many of these athletes have the benefit of taking part in cross country and indoor track with Pawlewicz this year.

Some of the athletes have participated in all three sports for a number of seasons under Pawlewicz and have great familiarity with him. He feels his experienced athletes have a solid understanding of the expectations he has for them.

Yet, the future is now for two of the Lady Warriors eighth-graders.

McKenzie Mattison and Reilly Harris have already completed two seasons on Hannibal’s girls’ varsity cross country team and are embarking on their second season on the schools girls’ varsity track and field team.

Many Lady Warrior athletes who were part of Hannibal’s varsity cross country and/or varsity indoor track teams are also a part of their track and field team.

Pawlewicz said his athletes took part in an active but rather laid back summer program with the hope of peaking towards the end of last fall’s cross country season.

During indoor track season, varsity track and field athletes were prepared throughout the winter. They worked at a steady pace to build momentum throughout the winter.

These athletes have a chance to peak later on in the track and field season. For the athletes that did both varsity cross country and indoor track, they were in decent physical condition.

The athletes who didn’t take part in indoor track weren’t as physically prepared to begin practices. However, Pawlewicz is impressed with how hard these athletes are working to prepare themselves for the season. He is confident the physical conditioning of these athletes will develop as the season goes on.

The Lady Warriors will be led by seniors (Clarkson University bound) Devin Sorell and Gabby Griffin and juniors Micheala Sheldon and Kristen D’Angelo.

Pawlewicz points out the basic traits of a captain is leadership on and off the track and being a great role model for teammates and peers. Taking it a step farther, Pawlewicz feels a captain is someone who dedicates him or herself to working as hard to be a student as he or she does to being an athlete.

Not only does Pawlewicz believe his captains personify the expectations he has for his captains, but he also mentions his captains have so much familiarity with him that they could almost serve as secondary coaches.

The road to a Sectional Championship will be challenging one for the Lady Warriors.

This season, Hannibal takes on the likes of Cazenovia and Skaneateles. Pawlewicz considers those to be among the best teams in the state.

Jordan-Elbridge will also be a challenging meet for the Lady Warriors. Pawlewicz goes on to mention that meets against Westhill and Tully won’t come easily either.

Perhaps Hannibal will be tested the most when they compete in the numerous dual meets that have been scheduled.

First off, the Lady Warriors will host the Hannibal Sports Boosters Invitational April 26. Along with Jordan-Elbridge, Hannibal will face perennial powers Christian Brothers Academy and Holland Patent.

The Lady Warriors will also be competing in the Tully Invitational and the Fulton Athletic Boosters Invitational. Perhaps one of the more challenging events Hannibal will be taking part in this season will be the Oswego County Invitational. In this meet, the Lady Warriors will face the likes of Mexico, Fulton, Phoenix and Oswego.

If Hannibal is to achieve its goals this season, it will need to be a team with many strengths. The Lady Warriors are expected to have many.

Pawlewicz said athletes taking part in the shot put event have a lot of potential. Expectations are high for Micheala Sheldon in the 3000-meters and Mckenzie Mattison is expected to be solid in the steeplechase.

Pawlewicz said Reily Harris has what it takes to be a strong contender in the 1,500-meters and Hannibal’s 4×100 meter team could be one of the toughest in Section 3.

Tayler Dence might be in for an impressive season in the 100 meter and hurdles events. Senior Captain Devin Sorell is striving to return to the State Qualifiers in the long jump and fellow senior Gabby Griffin is expected to have a solid season in the 400-meters.

Pawlewicz said freshmen Sydney Alton, Callie Cacchione and Janejira Cooper and others have the potential to provide depth for the 4×100 meters team. He also  expects athletes participating in the pole vault and high jump to improve as the season goes on.

News in brief

As of April 30, 2014, The Valley News will only accept classified advertisements for the Wednesday and Saturday print editions.

We will no longer publish classifieds online. To submit a classified ad, call us at 598-6397 or visit our office at 67 S. Second St., Fulton.

**********************

The Pratt House Museum, at 177 S. First St., Fulton, is hosting a program from 7 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, April 23.

The speaker will be Mercedes Niess,  executive director of the H. Lee White Marine Museum in Oswego. She will talk about the H. Lee White museum programming for this season, celebrating the 80th Anniversary of the lighthouse in Oswego and an art exhibit which will start at the Canal Museum in Syracuse, then move to Phoenix, then Fulton, and ending in Oswego.

Admission is free.

*********************

Anyone who is not registered to vote in the upcoming Fulton school board and school budget election can register from  to 5 p.m. April 22 at the Education Center at 167 S. Fourth St., Fulton.

The school board election and budget vote is May 20.

***********************

A fundraiser for the Fulton Jazz Festival is scheduled for 6 to 9 p.m. Wednesday April 23 at Under the Moon in Canal Landing, Fulton.

The event will include great music, food and fun. Space is limited. Register by calling 343-7681 or going online to oswegofultonchamber.com

Marie E. Oeinck Myers, volunteered at Oswego County Humane Society

Marie E. Oeinck Myers, 49, of Hannibal, passed away Sunday April 13.

Born in Syracuse, she had lived in the Hannibal area for many years.

Marie enjoyed the time she volunteered for the Oswego County Humane Society and listening to music.

She was predeceased by her mother, Ida Myers.

Marie’s memory will forever be cherished by her wife, Laurie F. Oeinck Myers; children, Jessica Myers and Kassie Myers; sisters, Theresa and Kim; brothers, Chuck and Johnny; aunt Gladys Harris; grandchildren Nathaniel and Zachary; several nieces, nephews and cousins.

A graveside service will be 2 p.m. Monday, April 21 Assumption Cemetery, Court Street, Syracuse.

Arrangements have been entrusted to Foster Funeral Home in Hannibal.

Frances P. Cowan, home schooled her children

Frances P. Cowan, age 63, of San Antonio, Texas, caught the 11:47 a.m. Heavenly Express, on April 11 following a heart attack, and arrived in the arms of her Blessed Savior, Jesus Christ.

She is survrived by her husband, Joseph Wayne Cowan and three children, sons Christopher Joel Cowan of Bay Shore, NY, Jonathan Aaron Cowan (and wife Dr. Vanessa ) of New York City, and daughter Sarah Angela Cowan of the San Antonio home.

Also surviving is her mother, Mabel Whelply, of Kingsport, Tenn. and four sisters, Arlene (Whelply) Lorimer and husband Charles of Millington, Tenn., Barbara (Whelply) Barbe and husband Kenneth of Englewood, Colo., Nancy L. (Whelply) Shelton and husband Ronald of Kingsport, Tenn., Kathy (Whelply) Weller and husband Steve of Phoenix, NY.

She is preceded in death by her father, Robert E. Whelply, and one older sister, Carolyn M. (Whelply) McConnell.

Fran was a dedicated stay at home mother and especially being a home school mother for her three children which now have all been graduated from various colleges and being proud citizens for God and country.

She often said she learned more while home schooling than when she was in school herself. Fran was also an accomplished seamstress and quilt maker.

Visitation was Tuesday, April 15 at the Hillscest Funeral Home Chapel in San Antonio, Texas. A graveside service was held April 16 at the Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery.

The family wishes to thank The Cristus Santa Rose Hospital in Westover Hills for the care they afforded Frances.in the ICU.

Randy Lewis Wallace, racing fan, roofer

4-19_OBITwallace

 

Randy Lewis Wallace, 64, longtime West Phoenix, and Phoenix, NY resident, passed away Thursday April 10, 2014 at the V. A. Medical Center, Syracuse, NY.

He was born in Fulton, NY Sept. 10, 1949. He was a U.S. Army veteran serving from 1966-1968.

Randy was a roofer. He was an avid fan and participant in auto racing and was known for his famous Q-2 car, as well as the Car 99 NY with the Wallace and Waldron Racing Team.

Randy was a fisherman and enjoyed camping and spending time with his family and friends.

He was predeceased by his mother, Virginia Alice (Egan) Wallace on Feb. 5, 1965; his father, Lewis Wallace on Jan. 9, 1993; his step-mother, Evelyn Grace (Delaney) Wallace on July 4, 2000; his sister-in-law, L. Julie Wallace on April 24, 2003; and  a grandnephew Mitchell Wallace, II on Dec. 16, 1989.

Surviving are his life long partner, Nora J. Wallace of Gouverneur; his daughters, Virginia I. Wallace of Alexandria Bay, Regina L. (Christopher) Murphy of Martville; his three grandchildren, Jacob Alan, Mariah Wallace; and Christopher Murphy, Jr.; his brother, Roland J. “Ronnie” Wallace; his two nephews, Mitch Wallace, and Mark Wallace; his one niece, Michelle Wallace; grandnieces and nephews, his many friends; and a special friend Tommy Considine.

Calling hours were Monday April 14 at the Allanson-Glanville-Tappan Funeral Home, 431 Main St., Phoenix. The American flag was presented to the family.

Raymond “Skip” Abrams, NASCAR fan, construction foreman

4-19_OBITabrams

 

Raymond “Skip” Abrams, Sr., 63, of Sterling, passed away Tuesday, April 15 at Upstate University Hospital in Syracuse.

He was a life resident of the Sterling-Martville area. Skip worked as a construction foreman for Fastrak Services, Inc. in Liverpool for many years and previously for Truax & Hovey in Liverpool.

He was an avid NASCAR race fan attending the races at Dover and Bristol. Skip was a devoted family man who held annual pool parties at his home.

Surviving are his three children, Raymond (Laurie) Abrams, Jr. of Sterling, George Abrams of Lyons and Lisa (Michael) Granieri of Fayetteville; longtime companion, Paula Seymour of Sterling; 10 grandchildren; one great-granddaughter; siblings Linda Parrow, Lorrie Welsh, Trudy Abrams and Murray Abrams all of Martville, Dottie Sage of Volney, Terry Catchpaw of Palermo, Rusty Abrams of Sterling and Debbie Dishaw of Penn.; and many nieces and nephews.

He was predeceased by a sister, Elizabeth “Punk” Parsons.

Calling hours were Friday April 18 at Foster Funeral Home, 837 Cayuga St.,  Hannibal with services immediately following with Rev. Dean Flemming officiating.

Burial will be at a later date in Martville Cemetery.

Phoenix school board adopts budget; residents vote May 20

By Debra J. Groom

The Phoenix school board has adopted a $42,559,049 budget for the 2014-15 school year.

Residents will vote on the budget May 20. They also will elect three members to the board of education. Petitions to run for the school board must be turned in by Monday.

The proposed budget for 2014-15 is up 1.99 percent – or $550,122 – over the budget for the current school year. It does not cut any academic programs, athletics or extracurricular activities.

The OASIS summer reading program is being cut for the summer of 2014, but Superintendent Judith Belfield said it could be revisited for the summer of 2015.

Spending is up only 1.33 percent.   Mos of the increase comes from increased pension costs associated with the fiscal downturn of 2008.

Belfield the district received more state aid in the final state budget than originally was proposed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo. This additional aid – about $300,000 – and the retirement of 10 teachers and five teacher assistants this year helped the district put together a budget that did not include staff and/or teacher layoffs.

The proposed budget includes money to replace some of the teachers who are retiring.

“We are replacing two K-6 teachers, a chemistry teacher, an instructional specialist and a special education teacher,” Belfield said. The budget also includes two new positions – a special education teacher and an elementary reading teacher.

Also, two part-time teaching positions are being increased from half time to full time – a high school social studies teacher and a high school Spanish teacher.

Belfield said the budget increases the tax levy – which is the amount to be raised by taxes – by 1.99 percent or $326,858. The estimated tax rate for most towns in the school district would be about $28.26 per $1,000 of assessed value, an increase of 55 cents per $1,000 from the current rate of $27.71 per $1,000.

Since the tax levy increase is less than the state-mandated cap placed on municipalities and school districts, residents will qualify for a refund of the tax increase from the state due to a proposal in the new state budget.

In addition to the budget and school board members, residents also will decide on whether to spend $429,200 to buy three 60-passenger school buses, one special needs bus and a camera system.

The public hearing on the budget will be at 7 p.m.May 6 at John C. Birdlebough High School. The vote is noon to 9 p.m. May 20 at Emerson J. Dillon Middle School.

Jerry’s Journal

Blame it on old-age, forgetfulness, or whatever, that I forgot to list in my last column, along with the other neighborhood school of our past, Walradt Street School, St. Mary’s School and Holy Family School.

Walradt Street School

Tony Leotta emailed me almost immediately to say it was sad that his alma mater hadn’t been included and to remind me that “Some of the best students of the First Ward and Granby attended and graduated from Walradt Street School.”

The building, constructed in 1922, is still standing.

“The first- and second-grade teacher in 1939-1941 was Ms. Sullivan,” he wrote, “and the third-grade teacher in 1941-42 was Ms. Hunt (both wonderful ladies). Ms. Sullivan was old and strict. Ms. Hunt was young and a sweetheart. We learned arithmetic and spelling very well.

“Walradt Street School only taught first through third grades. Kindergarten was not available in 1939 for us farm kids from the suburbs of Granby. Furthermore, farm kids were expected to be more mature and better disciplined before entering first grade,” he continued.

“Upon leaving Walradt, we joined Ms. Bracy’s fourth-grade class at Phillips Street School in 1942 with the kids from Oak Street School. The following year we advanced to Ms. Black’s fifth-grade class.

“Ms. Black was a wonderful teacher and a sweetheart. We began “passing classes” in the sixth grade at Phillips Street. Ms. Elsie Schneider (from Oswego) was our homeroom teacher. Ms. Schneider was a very nice and compassionate social studies and English teacher.

“Ms. Ellen Frawley was our outstanding arithmetic teacher and very knowledgeable in her teaching methods. Mental arithmetic was taught and emphasized. Jane Rasmussen, Barbara Edison, Marianne Nucifora, and Margie Campbell were all extra special star students at Phillips Street.

“And then in 1947, we advanced to Good Old Fulton High School along with eastside students from Fairgrieve and St. Mary’s School. . . I cherish all the elementary and high school memories. .  . Now I am 80 and on the on the verge of retirement next month.”

Tony Leotta graduated Fulton High School in 1951 and attended Syracuse University. I wish him well upon his retirement from his long-time position as Oswego city engineer and I thank him so much for sharing his precious memories with us.

(PS: There’s a big plaque on a mound of earth between two of the new houses on Phillips Street where the school once stood. It reads: High School, Union Free School, Dist. #2, AD, 1900.)

St. Mary’s School and Holy Family School 

It was Jim “Hunky” McNamara who  informed me one night at dinner with him and his wife Marlene and Ed and me, that I had forgotten not one but two other old schools, St. Mary’s and Holy Family.

“Holy Family,” I said, “wasn’t like the other schools, it wasn’t here that long.”

Located just off Hart Street on the west side, near the church it was named after and closed like the church the past few years, it was nice and new just about the time my own kids started school in the late 1950s and 60s.

Although they didn’t go there, we did enjoy the dances and wedding receptions and other special events in the basement banquet hall, and I just bet the children who did attend class there must have many cherished memories, too, just like the students at Walradt Street and St. Mary’s do.

Hunky went to St. Mary’s — first through eighth grade, as did his siblings, Pat, Joe, John, Norma, Mike and Tom — until he entered Fulton High School, like Tony Leotta did, as a freshman in 1947 to became part of our graduating Class of 1951.

His children, Tim, Tom, Terry, Michele and Donna, also attended St. Mary’s, in the 1960s and 70s.

Truth be known, though, I probably didn’t even know St. Mary’s existed until my high school days.

The funny thing about it is that it was on Buffalo Street just around the corner from the old Fairgrieve School on South Fourth Street where I went to junior high.

We 1930s kids pretty much stuck to our own schools, friends, and neighborhoods — until high school, that is, when our small worlds met and grew a little in knowledge and friendship.

Hunky’s recollections of St. Mary’s include second-grade teacher Sister Rita Veronica, “a beautiful young nun;” a fifth-grade teacher, Sister Etia” (he wasn’t sure how to spell her name); and Sister John Dominick who was the school principal.

“Most of the guys were afraid of her,” Hunky declared. Did she rap their knuckles with a ruler? I wondered. “Maybe if they were bad,” was the reply.

“I remember the sandbox in first grade,” he laughed. “It was a table sandbox with about 12 inches of sand and we played with toy cars and trucks and there were little houses and trees in it.”

“We had to help Mr. Guilfoyle take out the trash,” he also remembered. “When you were little?” I inquired. “No! In seventh grade,” he said, as he recalled that it was expected of the boys to do this chore.

Bill and Dick Frawley, twin brothers who lived on Buffalo Street across from the high school, were among Hunky’s school buddies, he said, though a year ahead of him, while Mary Catherine O’Brien, Mary Ann Monforte, John Vogt, Joe Fox and Joe Muscolino he named as some of his classmates.

Asked if he was aware of the nearby Fairgrieve School, he said, “Yes, of course… I played softball with the guys… there were three softball fields in the park,” he recalled,

“The East Side Park, that’s what they used to call it, and I played basketball with them in the high school gym — I hung out with them in the park!” he said.

I thanked Hunky for his recollections and said I’d see him and Marlene at Mimi’s for dinner on Wednesday night at usual.

Now here’s my caveat: Readers beware! I write for fun. I am not a historian, nor a reporter. I write from memory and from what others want to share.

Sometimes I look things up; sometimes I mess things up. I hope you have fun reading my stuff.

Your comments, additions and corrections are always welcome.

You may contact me at 133 Tannery Lane, Fulton, phone 592-7580 or email JHogan808@aol.com. Please put Jerry’s Journal in the subject line. Thanks!