All posts by Nicole Reitz

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Paul Santore, former legislator

Paul A. Santore, 68, died Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012 in St. Joseph Hospital, Syracuse.

He was born in Oswego, the son of Angeline (Zappala) Santore and the late Carmen Santore. He was employed with General Electric, Syracuse in the management analysis department and he was later plant manager for ARCOM Labs, Syracuse.

He served in the United States Army from 1961 until 1964.

He was the Oswego County Republican Committee treasurer, county legislator for eight years, and the Republican city chairman for five years.

He was president of the Oswego County Salvation Army board and a communicant of St. Mary’s Church. He was a member of Literacy Volunteers, Oswego County Veterans Museum, Oswego Library, and many more community organization.

In addition to his mother, he is survived by his wife, Judith Santore of Oswego; children, Paul (Karyn) Santore II of Hannibal and Lisa (Joseph) Miller of Kentucky; stepdaughters, Virginia Haney of Macedon and Carolee Haney of Florida; sisters, Joanne (Michael) Segretto of Oswego, Jane (Paul) Santore Talbot of Baldwinsville, and Marian (Steve) Bischof of Indiana; brother, Robert (Kate) Santore of East Syracuse; and grandchildren, Christianna, Alyssa, Carmyn, Zachary, Dominique, Matthew, Paul, and Mario.

Funeral services were held Monday at St. Mary of the Assumption Church, Oswego where Rev. Richard Morisette celebrated a Mass of Christian Burial. Burial was in St. Paul’s Cemetery.

Calling hours were held Sunday at Sugar & Scanlon Funeral Home, Oswego.

Contributions may be made to St. Mary’s Restoration Fund or the Oswego County Salvation Army.

Light In The Darkness: September 19, 2012

by Pastor David Grey

“For I received from the Lord what I also passed on to you: The Lord Jesus, on the night he was betrayed, took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it and said, “This is my body, which is for you; do this in remembrance of me. In the same way, after supper he took the cup, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood; do this, whenever you drink it, in remembrance of me.”  — 1 Corinthians 11:23-25

We are instructed to eat and drink the bread and wine of the Lord’s Supper in “a worthy manner,” meaning that we are to be careful to recognize the body and blood of the One it represents.

Adam Clarke, the pastor/theologian who lived in the 19th century, said, “To eat and drink the bread and wine in the Lord’s Supper unworthily is to eat and drink as the Corinthians did, who ate it not in reference to Jesus Christ’s sacrificial death; but rather in such a way as the Israelites did the Passover, which they celebrated in remembrance of their deliverance from Egyptian bondage. Likewise, these mongrel Christians at Corinth used it as a kind of historical commemoration of the death of Christ; and did not…discern the Lord’s body and blood as a sacrificial offering for sin…in their celebration…they acted in a way utterly unbecoming the gravity of a sacred ordinance.”

If I understand him correctly, he is saying that if we celebrate the Lord’s supper simply as a commemoration of the fact that we have been delivered from the fear and future of hell, we are doing so in an unworthy manner.

To read the rest of the column, pick up the latest copy of The Valley News. You may also subscribe to the paper by calling 598-6397
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Laughing Through Life: September 19, 2012

by Andrew Henderson

As I write this column, my back is still killing me.

I know what you are thinking and no, I did not play any type of sport — nor did I sleep in an awkward position in my super-duper comfy Tempur-Pedic bed.

The reason why my back hurts? My wife is a harpist.

She likes to harp, I mean, play the harp. And she is good at it, too, which means that she is asked to play at special functions, including weddings. This was the case during a recent weekend.

So, my job as the husband of the harpist to get the harp to and from the wedding. It’s no easy task…

First of all, let me introduce you to Petunia, the harp (yep, my wife named it). She is not one of those small hand-held harps you see in the cartoons when one of the characters dies and floats off to heaven, strumming an old hymn from the 1700s.

Nope, Petunia is large. She is a big ole’ pedal harp, which can also be defined in the musical circles as a concert harp — but don’t confuse it with a lever harp or a Celtic harp.

Yep, I’ve become an expert in all things harp. I think I need to watch some sports right about now…just to get an ounce of my “manly”-ness back.

A pedal harp typically has six and a half octaves (46 or 47 strings), weighs about 80 pounds, is approximately 6-feet high, has a depth of four feet, and is 21.5 inches wide at the bass end of the soundboard.

Eighty pounds, you say? That’s not bad, you proclaim? Well, there is also a harp “case,” which looks like a coffin big enough for a small person. It also weighs like one.

Petunia’s cage, ah I mean, case weighs just over 200 pounds by itself. The case is taller than me and is about twice as wide than me.

Luckily, it has wheels, but unfortunately the wheels are not the same distance from front to back. The wheels in front are just under 20-inches apart while the wheels in the back are roughly 30-inches apart.

So, in my Tim the Toolman Taylor mind, I tried coming up with a ramp design to allow the harp to be transported down a flight of stairs. That is the tricky part. It’s not too hard getting the Petunia off an on my truck. It’s those stairs. Those bloody stairs!

The thought of me being run over by a runaway harp in a coffin scared me, so I went the old fashioned route. I decided to carry it — with the help of two others — down the stairs on its way to the truck.

Then the proverbial light bulb illuminated over my head. Why don’t we just carry the case down the stairs first without Petunia and then carry Petunia second. Once we reached the bottom of the stairs, we could then strap Petunia into her case.

It’s easier to carry an 80-pound harp down the stairs than to carry a nearly 300-pound harp/case. I’m brilliant!

To read the rest of the column, pick up the latest copy of The Valley News. You may also subscribe to the paper by calling 598-6397
Carol Miller, sector coordinator and instructor with SUNY Oswego RSVP’s Osteo Bone Builders program, lifts hand weights used in the exercise and education program for those wishing to mitigate the effects of osteoporosis. RSVP will conduct a daylong instructor training session Sept. 27 at First United Methodist Church in Mexico.

RSVP to offer instructor training for Osteo Bone Builders program

Carol Miller, sector coordinator and instructor with SUNY Oswego RSVP’s Osteo Bone Builders program, lifts hand weights used in the exercise and education program for those wishing to mitigate the effects of osteoporosis. RSVP will conduct a daylong instructor training session Sept. 27 at First United Methodist Church in Mexico.

SUNY Oswego’s Retired and Senior Volunteer Program will conduct a volunteer training session Thursday, Sept. 27, for the Osteoporosis Bone Builders program. The training, set for 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., will take place at First United Methodist Church, 4372 Church St. in Mexico.

The instructor training is free and lunch will be provided. Class size is limited and the deadline for registration is Thursday, Sept. 20.

Virginia Gilbert, a retired RSVP director from the Albany area, will conduct the daylong session. She is now a consultant for the implementation of the Bone Builders program nationwide.

Bone Builders is a peer-led program of exercise and education for the control of osteoporosis. Helping people control osteoporosis through weight-bearing exercise led by volunteer instructors is one of many volunteer opportunities offered through RSVP.

A prerequisite for the training is a background in physical education or experience with senior fitness and exercise. Prospective instructors are encouraged to visit a current Bone Builders site.

RSVP held its initial training for Bone Builders instructors in May 1999, and the program has grown to 25 sites, 67 instructors and more than 400 participants. Research scientists at Tufts University in Boston developed the prototype for Bone Builders with support from the Massachusetts Department of Health and the National Osteoporosis Foundation.

In her book “Strong Women Stay Young,” Dr. Miriam Nelson reported, “After a year of strength training twice a week, women’s bodies were 15 to 20 years more youthful. They had less fat and more muscle; bone loss was prevented or reversed; their strength and energy increased dramatically; and they showed surprising gains in balance and flexibility. No other program — whether diet, medication or aerobic exercise — has ever achieved comparable results.”

RSVP, sponsored locally by SUNY Oswego and the United Way, enables people ages 55 and older to remain productive through volunteerism.

In each county, RSVP, a federal initiative of the Corporation for National and Community Service, assists nonprofit agencies by recruiting, placing and supporting volunteers.

Those seeking to register for the training session, to receive RSVP’s bimonthly Mature Living newsletter or for more information, may contact RSVP at 312-2317 or rsvp@oswego.edu.

Oswego County loses two more public servants

by Carol Thompson

Oswego County government has suffered the loss of two more public servants.

Former legislator Paul Santore died Thursday, Sept. 13. Santore, 68, of Oswego, served as the Oswego County Republican Committee treasurer and was the Republican City chairman for five years.

Santore served eight years in the county legislature. After leaving the legislature, he was a regular fixture at committee meetings.  He sat in the same seat during each meeting and it became known as his reserved seat.

Santore was employed with General Electric, Syracuse, in the management analysis department, and he was later plant manager for ARCOM Labs, Syracuse. He served in the United States Army from 1961 until 1964

Also passing Thursday was William Brouse, a former county legislator and county treasurer.

 To read the rest of the story, pick up the latest copy of The Valley News. You may also subscribe to the paper by calling 598-6397

Poetry Corner: A New Home in the Neighborhood

by Jim Farfaglia

A New Home in the Neighborhood

 

Someone has used the long arm of their dreams

to dig a hole in the earth,

then squared its sides with their strong will.

 

An old men stands at the edge of that hole

to peer into such a noble beginning,

watching as it fills with his memories:

 

the solid foundation of a growing family,

the heavy bricks of life’s long, steady climb,

the crushed stone of regret.

 

Off to the side he sees wheelbarrows and rakes,

tools that bore the loads he once carried,

that smoothed the roads he has traveled.

 

He takes note of the inventory: stacks of lumber,

coils of wire, tunnels of piping –

raw material to make something of this space

 

that a younger man will use

to raise his own dreams, to build himself

a life worth remembering.

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Camp Hollis to hold family-oriented Hollis Harvest Day

Oswego County youth and family members may celebrate the autumn season Saturday, October 20, 2012 at the Hollis Harvest Day. This free event runs from 3 to 8 p.m. at Camp Hollis just off Lakeshore Road in Oswego.

Guests may participate in games and outdoor activities including fall-themed games, a costume parade, trick-or-treating from cabin to cabin, pumpkin decorating, arts and crafts, trail walks, a campfire and much more.

Many of the activities at Hollis Harvest will be held outside, so participants should dress accordingly.

There will also be an indoor space where visitors can enjoy craft projects and refreshments.

Admission is free; however, donations of new and gently used gloves and winter hats will be accepted. Registration is not required.

Youth age 12 and younger must have an adult attend the event with them.

Those seeking more information may call the Oswego County Youth Bureau at 349-3451.

Christian writer Lisa M. Buske unveils the cover of her book “Where’s Heidi, One Sister’s Journey” at a ceremony held Friday at the Heidi Allen Memorial Garden, located on the property of the convenience store where Heidi was working when she disappeared. Friday marked Heidi Allen’s 37th birthday.

‘Where’s Heidi’ book cover unveiled

Christian writer Lisa M. Buske unveils the cover of her book “Where’s Heidi, One Sister’s Journey” at a ceremony held Friday at the Heidi Allen Memorial Garden, located on the property of the convenience store where Heidi was working when she disappeared. Friday marked Heidi Allen’s 37th birthday.

by Carol Thompson

New Haven author Lisa M. Buske revealed the cover to her book, “Where’s Heidi” at an emotional ceremony held Friday at the location where her sister, Heidi Allen, disappeared.

“Losing Heidi over 19 years ago was difficult. We also worried about Lisa,” Sue Allen, the mother of Heidi and Lisa, said.

Through tears, Allen said that you can turn your life around from tragedy.

“We hope it will help others,” she said of her daughter’s book.

Allen was introduced by Oswego County Sheriff Reuel “Moe” Todd, who said the goal is to bring Heidi home.

“That’s what we’re here for,” he said.

Todd noted that every lead is followed as the investigation continues.

Heidi Allen disappeared from the convenience store where she was working on Easter morning 1994.

The 18 year old was working alone as a cashier at the D&W Convenience Store, located at the intersection of State Routes 104 and 104B in the Town of New Haven and had opened the store at approximately 5:45 a.m.

About 7:50 a.m., a marked Oswego County Sheriff’s Department patrol unit was flagged down in the area by a citizen who reported that the convenience store was open with lights and gas pumps on, but no one tending the business.

Allen had apparently vanished from the store. Additional sheriff’s units were called to the scene and an investigation commenced. Intense scrutiny revealed that the cause of her disappearance was foul play.

The book cover unveiling was held at the Heidi Allen Memorial Garden, located at the store property, on the late afternoon of the missing sibling’s birthday.

Buske, a Christian author, thanked Todd for being at the event and also thanked her parents for giving her permission to write the book.

The first draft was written in 2006. She said, “It was emotional vomit.”

She rewrote her manuscript and in 2010, she attended her first writers conference and proceeded through the process of finding a publisher. She ultimately chose to self-publish her book because, she said, publishers take too much control of what you can do and when you can speak.

“I want to keep it community and I want to keep it home,” Buske said.

 To read the rest of the story, pick up the latest copy of The Valley News. You may also subscribe to the paper by calling 598-6397