All posts by Nicole Reitz

Fulton High School Class of 1962 met in July for their 50th class reunion at Lakeview Lanes. In front from left are Lois Kring Proietto, Kathy Wilcox, Shirley Zellar, Carol Clemons Case, Ellen Mayer Barbagallo, Sharon Hastings, Nanci Blaich Blance, Jennifer Allen Killian, Phyllis Cole O’Grady, Jim Bonnie, and Carol Harbottle Alburger. In second row are Nancy Hudyma Close, Judy Falanga, Sally Diffin Smith, Marilyn Papaleo Brown, Sharon Ducharme Moody, Roxanne Taylor Wooding, Jeri Ure Cole, Terry Patrick Burnett, Linda Tetro Quinlan, Mary Jacobs Follenweider, Charlene Wilcox Fitzgerald, Gerald (Jake) Ballard,  Jim Meagher, Joyce Shambo Lee, and Mary Rogozinksi Lalone. In third row are Mervyn Gaylard, Peter Poulakis, Neill Anderson, Lyle (Jerry) Salsbury, John LeClair, Ed Kerfein, John (Jack) Rodger, Bob Misch, Chris Keller, Lee Williams, Glenn Barker, and Joyce Lamay McDowell. In fourth row are Joy Young, Bill Roy, Clancy Peters, Eileen Salls Oliver, Theron (Skeeter) Scoville, Roger Stewart, Bob Salvage, Ken Reynolds, Eunice Demperio Pomeroy, Roger Huss, Jim Growe, Bill Spaulding, Wayne Beardsley, Don Slokowski, Peter Bock, Linda Peck Greene, Neil Osborne, Eric Black, Lee Stanton, Joe Tetro, Axel Luther, and Joe Cosimano.

Class of 1962 holds 50th reunion

Fulton High School Class of 1962 met in July for their 50th class reunion at Lakeview Lanes. In front from left are Lois Kring Proietto, Kathy Wilcox, Shirley Zellar, Carol Clemons Case, Ellen Mayer Barbagallo, Sharon Hastings, Nanci Blaich Blance, Jennifer Allen Killian, Phyllis Cole O’Grady, Jim Bonnie, and Carol Harbottle Alburger. In second row are Nancy Hudyma Close, Judy Falanga, Sally Diffin Smith, Marilyn Papaleo Brown, Sharon Ducharme Moody, Roxanne Taylor Wooding, Jeri Ure Cole, Terry Patrick Burnett, Linda Tetro Quinlan, Mary Jacobs Follenweider, Charlene Wilcox Fitzgerald, Gerald (Jake) Ballard, Jim Meagher, Joyce Shambo Lee, and Mary Rogozinksi Lalone. In third row are Mervyn Gaylard, Peter Poulakis, Neill Anderson, Lyle (Jerry) Salsbury, John LeClair, Ed Kerfein, John (Jack) Rodger, Bob Misch, Chris Keller, Lee Williams, Glenn Barker, and Joyce Lamay McDowell. In fourth row are Joy Young, Bill Roy, Clancy Peters, Eileen Salls Oliver, Theron (Skeeter) Scoville, Roger Stewart, Bob Salvage, Ken Reynolds, Eunice Demperio Pomeroy, Roger Huss, Jim Growe, Bill Spaulding, Wayne Beardsley, Don Slokowski, Peter Bock, Linda Peck Greene, Neil Osborne, Eric Black, Lee Stanton, Joe Tetro, Axel Luther, and Joe Cosimano.

Valley Viewpoints: Caring 12-year-old

by Amy M. Tresidder, Legislator

Emily Bradshaw, a 12-year old Oswego city resident, attended the most recent meeting of the Oswego County Legislature. Emily stood in front of the legislature and the many citizens in attendance and with confidence and poise spoke to the plight of the homeless in Oswego.

Before the meeting, Emily had contacted every legislator, as well as her city councilor and the Mayor of Oswego.

Emily is a caring, compassionate person who is not afraid to stand up for what she feels is a need in our community.

Thank you, Emily, for being a concerned citizen, for speaking up, and for being the face of homeless in Oswego County.

Valley Viewpoints: Nobody home

by Frank Castiglia of Fulton

I’m going to give you all the Reader’s Digest version of what happened this past week in my neighborhood.

It all started Thursday morning with a call from my neighbor who had just had buried her husband of 61 years the day before. I thought it must be a real emergency or she wouldn’t be calling at 6 a.m. She was very upset because she had found more cockroaches in her driveway the night before and she was crying and wanted the number of our common councilor.

She said she couldn’t take it anymore. The problem roaches were coming from the rental property next door to her.

Later Thursday, I saw her outside her house and she said she had called our councilor and also the mayor. I told her that I would call both of them myself. I also called the code enforcement office.

When talking to the mayor’s office, I was told that the problem was going to be taken care of. When I got back from work Thursday, I was told by my neighbor that the councilor had been there earlier in the day and made sure all the trash was picked up.

I asked if the mayor had called or been there and she said, “No.” She was told he would call her of Friday.

The code-enforcement officer had been there but did not go in the apartment house at all. I asked her why not and she didn’t know. We then talked to the councilor and found out that the code-enforcement officer that takes care of these problems is out of town for a least a week. I said, “Well, our mayor has said more then a few times how he is a code enforcement officer, why doesn’t he come up here?” She didn’t know why.

Friday came and went and there was no visit from the mayor and no one came to treat the apartment house for the roach problem. The only visitors were the roaches that were passing through the driveway. The neighbor said that the mayor’s office said he would call on Monday.

Over the weekend, the landlord came and spot sprayed for the roach problem. Meanwhile, my neighbor had many people come and treat both her house and lawn and also half way around the apartment building.

Monday came and by 9:30 a.m. no call from the mayor to my neighbor. She called him again. This time she was put on hold and then got to talk to him.

In the conversation, she said that the mayor knew the landlord and they had dealt with her before and they would take care of it (That means he will call her and ask her if she has taken care of the problem: at least that is what has happened in the past).

He also tried to smooth things over with telling her that anything she puts out for collection will be picked up.

I didn’t bother calling the mayor again because once I’ve heard a bad song, I don’t care to hear it again.

Now the point is that nobody from codes office has been inside the apartment house to see for themselves. So I guess nobody is at home.

When you call the cable company they give you a four-hour window for when they will show up to fix the problem. I guess that when you call the city (not the councilor) they give you a five-day or two-week window or don’t show up at all.

Now I would have taken this to the common council meeting Tuesday night but the council has forbid anyone from saying anything negative about any city workers and that includes the mayor. Just another way of “Silencing the Lambs.”

I would like to say thank you to our fine Fourth Ward councilor. She was right up here and did all she could.

Kenneth Coant Sr., Marine veteran

Kenneth William Coant, Sr., 72, formerly of Fulton died in Bowling Green, FL Aug. 24, 2012 after a sudden illness.

He was a Marine veteran. He was a life member of B.P.O.E # 830 in Fulton. He was a deputy for the Oswego County Sheriff’s Department. He retired from Nestle after 35 years. He owned a restaurant in Fulton called Jim’s Soda Spot.

He was an avid race fan. He enjoyed races at Oswego Speedway. He enjoyed cooking, playing bingo, shopping and having fun at the casino.

He was predeceased by his wife, Mary Susan Coant, in 2010; a grandson, Samuel William Heer, in 2010; and a son, Ronald James Coant in 2004.

Surviving are his children, Kenneth William Coant Jr. of Florida, Kathy Coant-Heer and Samuel Arthur Heer of Central Square; Two sisters, Gert Dann and Betty Hayle of Fulton; a brother, Herman Coant of Fulton; his grandchildren, Ashley Pittsley of Oswego, Joshua Pittsley, and Koa Clark of Mexico, Brandon Pittsley and Dylan Pittsley of Central Square and Tiffany and Chelsea Coant of Fulton; And a great-grandson, Hunter James Pettit of Oswego.

A memorial service will be held at a later date in New York.

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Hannibal soccer defeats Phoenix

by Rob Tetro

The Hannibal girls varsity soccer team cruised past Phoenix Wednesday afternoon.

The Lady Warriors jumped out to a five-goal first half lead and didn’t look back. Though Phoenix was more competitive during the second half, Hannibal came away with an 8-2 win.

The Lady Firebirds were led by Kylie Wallace and Brooke Dolbear, who each scored a goal. Keepers Kylie Wallace and Jessica Lord combined to save 18 shots on goal.

With the loss, Phoenix falls to 0-5 on the season. Up next for the Lady Firebirds are games against Jordan-Elbridge Monday and Cazenovia Wednesday.

The Lady Warriors were led by Kassi Jones and Devin Sorrell. They both had two goals and an assist against Phoenix.

 To read the rest of the story, pick up the latest copy of The Valley News. You may also subscribe to the paper by calling 598-6397

In And Around Hannibal: September 22, 2012

by Rita Hooper

“For Brave Men and Adventurous Women,” a play written by Hannibal resident John Donohue about the famous Yukon Gold Rush will be performed at St. Clare’s Theater, 812 N. Salina St., Syracuse, Saturday, Sept. 22 at 7 p.m. Tickets are discounted if you’re in costume.

What was Hannibal like in the times of the Yukon Gold Rush?

The population of Hannibal Town was 2,148 people.

Hannibal Fire Co. was incorporated in 1910; Rienza Bradt was the first fire chief and remained in that position until 1923. He operated a flour and feed store in the Village. They purchased a two wheeled, hand drawn, chemical cart for $500 from American LaFrance Fire Engine Co. Jay Campbell put it in a Ford Chassis.

Joel Sprague was master of the Golden Sheaf Grange #587, which had been formed in 1889 with a charter membership of 40 “in response to the deep felt need of many people of Hannibal and vicinity for a more abundant social and intellectual life.” The Hannibal Center Grange formed in 1912.

James V. Burt was president of the village.

Teachers in rural school districts were lucky to be paid $2 a day

Harry Wheeler, Rockwell Powers and Melzar Van Auken were the rural route mail carriers serving Routes 1, 2 and 3 respectively.

The Masonic Lodge in Hannibal was about 85 years old and W.C. Matteson was the Master of the Lodge and JR Chamberlain secretary.

World War I had not yet happened but Hannibal was still suffering the effects of the Civil War. The Grand Army of the Republic was a fraternal organization of Civil War veterans. O.A. Kipp was the Hannibal commander.

Other officers were A.L. Elridge, John Kennedy, Dr. D.F. Acker, and John H. Baker.

The GAR Auxiliary was organized about 1902. Helen Tucker was its first president. In order to be a member you had to be a wife or daughter of a Civil War veteran. Their meetings were held over Cooper’s store, later owned by William Shutts and operated as a restaurant…some of my older readers may have childhood memories of this!

About 400 men served in the Civil War from Hannibal. The majority of these soldiers nationally were under 18. Twenty-five of them under 10, 105,000 were 15, sounds more like children to me!

Harry Lockwood was the town’s outstanding athlete. “He acted as the spark plug for his teammates.” In 1910 and 1911, he played first base for Hannibal; in 1942 he coached Hannibal’s team onto a 18-2 record. World War II cut into his plans for a future career. During the ‘48 season he had a .320 batting average and 12 home runs. He later went on to play for Geneva in the Border League, Wilkes-Barre in Class B and later played in the Canadian League.

During this period of time, the Presbyterian Church was served by Rev. W.A. McKenzie DD an Rev. B.A. Matzen. The Baptist Church was served by Rev. Paul Brown. The Baptist Church later federated with the Presbyterian Church in 1926 forming the Community Church

The Baptist Church is the current library.

In 1910, Rev. Beldin E. Pratt was appointed pastor at the Hannibal Methodist Church, “as he was the only resident pastor, there was plenty of work for his to do.”

S.R. Lockwood was principal of the Hannibal Village School and oversaw the building of the current high school after a fire destroyed the previous one. The average graduating class size for this period was 5 – 6. I think the school colors at the time were red and black – did they become purple at centralization? One of my readers must have the answer!

Vocational agriculture and academic housemaking courses were introduced, with Hannibal being one of the very first in New York State and one of the oldest in the US.

Lena Cox Hewitt was alumni president in 1912. The Alumni Association was formed in 1904.

Electricity had not yet come to Hannibal. The roads were not paved.

The NY Central railroad served Hannibal with 3 daily trains west and 4 east. The Hannibal Agent was Lincoln Stopellben (1905 – 1938.)

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Now back to the news – the current news!

There will be no school on Monday – Superintendent’s Conference Day

The Hannibal Senior Meals program will meet this Monday, Wednesday and Friday at noon for lunch. Most of the folks come earlier for cards and games, conversation and coffee. They meet at the Community Center (Library) on Oswego St. To make your reservation, please call Rosemary at 564-5471.

By the way, Rosemary is busy preparing for the Hawaiian Candlelight Dinner, set for Oct. 10 from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Fire Department, with a great menu, entertainment and door prizes. This year’s theme is a Hawaiian one – Remember it’s always fun to dress for the occasion.

The Hannibal Historical Society will begin its 2012 – 2013 program season on Monday, Sept. 24 at the Hannibal Community Center, located across from the firehouse on Oswego Street in Hannibal. The group will meet at 6 p.m. for a business meeting, followed by the evening’s program, which will begin at 7 p.m. Kirk Coates, an adjunct professor at SUNY Oswego, will speak about “Reconstruction – America’s Second Civil War.” The public is invited and refreshments will be served.

Hannibal Historical Society is planning on offering another Christmas ornament for sale this holiday season. This one is pewter and will feature the Baptist Church/Community Center on it. Its delivery is expected soon and once inspected they will be available for  purchase – hopefully by the Sept. 24 meeting. It’s not too early to be working on your Christmas list – it will help you cut down on the holiday anxiety and let us remember the reason for the season.

The Hannibal Jammers will be meeting this Monday at 7 p.m. at the American Legion on Rochester St.

TOPS will meet at Our Lady of the Rosary on Wednesday at 5:45 p.m.

The Hannibal Methodist Church hosts a free chili and soup lunch Thursdays at 11:30 a.m. Good food and good people to talk with. Take-outs available.

Hannibal Music Boosters will be meeting at 7:30 to 9 p.m. at the High School Library on Thursday, Sept. 27.

The Hannibal Fire Company’s next breakfast buffet will be Sunday, Sept. 30 beginning at 8 a.m at the Hannibal Firehouse, Oswego Street, Hannibal.

The menu includes pancakes, French toast, bacon, sausage, scrambled eggs, home fries, toast, sausage gravy, biscuits, and beverages.

Oct. 7, from noon until 5 there will be a benefit for the Wounded Warriors Project at the American Legion. Included will be a spaghetti dinner and entertainment and a motorcycle ride to several other American Legion Posts in the afternoon for those so inclined.

Oct. 10 from noon to 4 p.m. and Oct. 13 at 2 p.m., the Municipal Building will be open for people to register for voting.

The Friends of the Hannibal Free Library will be holding a book and bake sale Saturday, Oct. 13 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Sunday, Oct. 14 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. There will be hundreds of books, videos, and CD’s for all ages and interests. There will also be a wide variety of baked goods for sale. For more information please call Faith at 564-5192.

Don’t forget too include the food pantry at the Hannibal Resource Center on your shopping list. Lend a hand to your neighbors who need a hand up – remember some day it could be you! The center is located in the basement of Our Lady of the Rosary’s rectory across from the High School.

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Hodgepodge: September 22, 2012

by Roy Hodge

Looking through old issues of The Fulton Patriot this week, I came across a column I wrote that brought back memories. It told of my grandparents spending the evening with their friends and neighbors, the Cranes, on Halloween. It seemed to be a tradition.

The good friends would get together at one of their homes, which were across the street from each other. After asking us grandchildren and neighborhood friends to “come early” to get our treats, they would turn the lights down low, and share door answering duties while fitting in some conversation and some treats of their own.

Living across the street from each other wasn’t their only connection. My grandfather and Mr. Crane worked together for many years at the Lasher Hardware Co. in downtown Syracuse.

The Cranes were quite a few years older than my grandparents, and fittingly, their car was much older than the jaunty 1940-something bright blue Pontiac that my grandfather drove. But I thought Mr. Crane’s old car was “neat.” It seemed to be a couple of feet taller than my grandfather’s car; it had “running boards”, and an “ooga-ooga” horn.

I also remember for some reason that the Crane’s telephone had to be cranked to get an operator to place a call for them. Boy, they must have been old.

The Cranes’ home was different than the other houses on Kenmore Ave. My grandfather told me that it was the oldest house on the street, and at one time was part of a busy farm.  The barn was still standing and was used by Mr. Crane as a garage.

When my grandparents lived across the street their home and the other houses on the street were much newer than the Crane house – but not new.

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I told you last week about a law that I thought might still be in the books in Gary, Indiana: “It is illegal to take a street car or go to the theater within four hours of eating garlic.”

I first came up with that information several years ago when I was reading “The Book of Garlic,” the garlic lovers’ bible. That very useful book also offers the following advice: “For an earache: Place a peeled but uncut clove of garlic in the ear. Let it sit in the ear through the day.

“If it’s a headache that’s bothering you, apply garlic to the temples in a poultice. For whooping cough place a poultice of chopped garlic on the feet.  If acne is your problem, rub the pimples with a cut clove of garlic several times a day.”

Garlic is also described as just the thing to cure poison ivy, athlete’s foot, insomnia, and as a perfect aphrodisiac.

To read the rest of the column, pick up the latest copy of The Valley News. You may also subscribe to the paper by calling 598-6397

Raewynn Matthews, former Oswego resident

Raewynn “Red” James Matthews, a Las Vegas resident for more than 45 years, died Sept. 5, 2012.

He was born Feb. 26, 1935 to Henry James and Thelma Matthews of Oswego.

He was preceded in death by his brother, Brian, and twin brother, Corwynn.

Starting out his young life at Nellis Air Force Base, he continued working hard as a member of the Las Vegas Labor Union Local 872. He was a master mechanic and was well-known for his workmanship of collecting and restoring old John Deere tractors.

Fishing, hunting and bird watching were also his passions

He is survived by his wife of 52 years, Janice; his son, Tod and his wife, Jodee, and their children, Kyle, Clayton, Lauren and Brian; and his son, Henry and his son Dylan; and other family members.

Services will be held at 11:20 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 26, at Southern Nevada Veterans Memorial Cemetery, 1900 Buchanan Blvd., Boulder City, Nevada.