All posts by Nicole Reitz

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Reapportionment may be costly for taxpayers

by Carol Thompson

The Oswego County Legislature’s Community and Consumer Affairs Committee was warned that the current reapportionment map could cost taxpayers an additional $20,000 to $30,000.

County Board of Elections Commissioner Donald Wart said during Wednesday’s meeting that the reapportionment, as it now stands, will require the addition of election districts.

“Based on the fact that our budget has been submitted and what I saw on the map, I would just like to call to the committee’s attention, based on the new lines that we probably will be looking at more election districts,” he said, adding that the budget will be left $20,000 to $30,000 short.

Wart said it was his understanding that the maps are still being looked at and that the elections budget will be short of funds.

Legislature Chairman Fred Beardsley said he didn’t understand. If there are the same number of legislators and the same districts in each town, why the need for more districts, he asked.

Wart said it’s because there are two legislators on the same ballot in a town. If you carve out a corner, that creates additional election districts, he noted.

To read the rest of the story, pick up the latest copy of The Valley News. You may also subscribe to the paper by calling 598-6397
Doyle’s Bike Sales is beginning to collect used bikes to be given to children this upcoming holiday season. Owner Tracy Doyle began the annual holiday bike give-away in the late 1990s. Since then, he has given hundreds and perhaps thousands of bikes to needy children in the Fulton and Oswego areas. Pictured with Doyle (left) is Joe Arnold.

Unwanted bikes sought for annual Christmas give-away

Doyle’s Bike Sales is beginning to collect used bikes to be given to children this upcoming holiday season. Owner Tracy Doyle began the annual holiday bike give-away in the late 1990s. Since then, he has given hundreds and perhaps thousands of bikes to needy children in the Fulton and Oswego areas. Pictured with Doyle (left) is Joe Arnold.

by Andrew Henderson

‘Tis the season…to donate bikes for children in need.

Doyle’s Bike Sales is beginning to collect used bikes to be given to children this upcoming holiday season.

Owner Tracy Doyle began the annual holiday bike give-away in the late 1990s. Since then, he has given hundreds and perhaps thousands of bikes to needy children in the Fulton and Oswego areas.

“It started with some teachers coming in asking me if I had a bicycle here and there that I could help out a kid with,” said Doyle. “They explained to me that some of these kids in grade school would come to school with shoes that had to be taped on. These teachers would actually go to the store and buy clothes for these kids. I couldn’t believe it. These poor kids have nothing — and it ain’t there fault.”

At the time, Doyle would receive some bikes that the owners did not want anymore. He was told to use them for parts.

“I started to fix them up and I would give some of the needy kids bikes,” he said. “At one time, we had so many that we did it down at the park — and I filled the skating rink with bikes.”

Since then, Doyle has teamed with the Salvation Army, local churches, and area businesses in holding the bike give-away.

“I didn’t want a free-for-all,” he said. “There’s a guy in Syracuse who does it every year at Christmas. Anyone can show up and get a bike.”

Doyle also wanted to make sure that those in need receive the bikes. One year, Doyle teamed with the Fulton Police Department and its annual bike rodeo.

“There were people standing in line to get bikes for their kids and they had more money than I do,” he said. “Not that I am loaded  or anything, but they are well-off people. That’s not what it was meant for.”

This year, the bike giveaway will be held at Fred Raynor Ford in Fulton.

  To read the rest of the story, pick up the latest copy of The Valley News. You may also subscribe to the paper by calling 598-6397
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Fulton Community Theatre to present suspense and horror tales

Classic tales of horror and suspense are the offering this Halloween season as Fulton Community Theatre will stage “Foretold Tales.”

The production, featuring a quartet of one-act plays drawn from stage, old time radio, and pulp fiction, will run weekends Oct. 19, 20, 21, 27, and 28 at the theatre’s home performance space, Jubilee Hall in Holy Trinity Church, 309 Buffalo St., Fulton.

Curtain times for the Friday and Saturday night performances are 8 p.m.; the Sunday matinees will begin at 3 p.m. Tickets may be reserved by calling 315-598-7840.

“Foretold Tales” includes the Lucille Fletcher plays “Sorry, Wrong Number” and “The Hitchhiker”; the classic horror story “The Monkey’s Paw”; and “I of Newton,” based on the short-story by science fiction author Joe Haldeman and adapted for the stage by the production’s director and FCT Artistic Director William Edward White.

“These are the kind of stories that kept several generations of American kids – including myself – looking for the monster under their beds,” White quipped about the anthology evening that makes up FCT’s first Halloween offering.

“Be it ‘The Twilight Zone’ or ‘Alfred Hitchcock’ or ‘Monster Movie Matinee’ on the old WSYR Channel 3 in Syracuse, or even the CBS Radio Mystery theatre and reruns of Orson Welles, ‘Lights Out’, and ‘Suspense’ on WRVO in Oswego, scary, well told stories just stay with you,” he added about the genre.

The production features the talents of Betsy York, Michael A. Bolio, Scott Pflanz, Renee Fenske, Adam Schmidtman, Beverly Poznoski, Sabrina Woodward, and Rita Lapage portraying over 24 roles.

“Sorry, Wrong Number” — made famous on 1940s radio by Agnes Moorehead — tells the story of Leona Stevenson, a neurotic invalid, whose only contact with the outside world is her phone. Over this one night, because of a crossed wire, she hears plans for a murder. York plays Leona, with Fenske as the operator.

In “I of Newton,” Faust takes a comic turn through the chalk-dusted world of advanced calculus when mathematical prodigy Samuel Ingard accidentally conjures up a Demon while trying to solve an advanced equation. Schmidtmann plays Sam, with Bolio as the Demon.

“The Hitchhiker” — originally written for the voice of Orson Welles — is a modern take on an old folktale about Ronald Adams, an average motorist, who sets out to drive from Brooklyn to California, and his encounters with a strange and inexplicable hitch hiker. Pflanz plays Adams, with Bolio as the titular hitch hiker.

“The Monkey’s Paw” — adapted from W. W. Jacobs classic “Be Careful What You Wish For Story” — recounts the story of the White family, who while entertaining an old friend, come into the possession of an object that is said to grant its owner three wishes. Bolio plays Mr. White, with York as Mrs. White, Schmidtmann at Herbert, and Pflanz as the mysterious Sergeant Major Morris.

Those seeking more information may visit  www.fultoncommunitytheatre.net, or send an e-mail at fultoncommunitytheatre@gmail.com.

Leon Archer

The Sportsman’s World: September 29, 2012

Leon Archer

by Leon Archer

I sacrificed the early goose season so that Sweet Thing and I could go to Sammamish, Wash. (just a ways east of Seattle) to visit my son, Ben, and our daughter-in-law, Meghan.

We spent a wonderful couple of weeks getting reacquainted with the sights and sounds of Western Washington.

Last Monday, I watched Green Bay play the Seattle Seahawks. It wasn’t just the final play that was goofed, there were poor calls or no calls all through the game.

That didn’t have much effect on our trip; I just thought I’d mention it since it seems like everyone else in the U.S. has done so, including the president.

This is the dry season in the Northwest – no, it doesn’t always rain in Seattle. We had one day of light drizzle, but for the most part it was sunny or partly overcast.

Washington desperately needs some rain, but the weather patterns don’t look promising. They have some huge forest fires in the Wenachee Mountains that had burned more than 140 square miles the last time I heard, which was about four days ago. They were not overly optimistic about getting them under control right away.

In the meantime, we took advantage of the tourist type weather to visit Pike’s market, where we picked up some smoked salmon and some fruit and vegetables. We bought some of the best peaches and mangos that I have ever tasted. The peaches were from Washington; I think the mangos were from Honduras.

We also visited the precinct office that my son works out of as a Seattle policeman. This is his seventh year on the force, which about makes him a veteran. Seattle has its own problems just like any city, but I feel pretty safe there, especially walking around with a policeman as a guide — off duty and in plain clothes, of course.

Ben’s wife has some relatives who are big time pheasant and duck hunters and I wanted to get to know them. I saw some of their bags from past hunts and they were impressive.

On one hunt, they limited out with just green head mallards. I’ve done that a few times, and they remain very memorable hunts for me. They also get quite a variety of birds at times.

In their pictures, I could easily identify pintails, widgeon, shovelers, ring bills, blue wing teal, cinnamon teal, mallards, and wood ducks. I am hoping I might be able to finagle myself into a hunt or two with those guys.

They hunt pheasants in Eastern Washington, which is a big grain growing section of the state. Mostly the farmers grow wheat, which doesn’t make for really fat birds like corn will produce, but they are good eating all the same.

They had all cock birds in their pictures, but I don’t know if they are the only ones legal or if they just pass up hens.

Of course, when you are near a fish hatchery, you just have to visit it, especially if the fish are running. There is a salmon hatchery in nearby Issaqua and the king salmon had started showing up, so we went to have a look. It isn’t quite the state of the art hatchery like we have in Altmar, but it does raise and release a lot of king and coho salmon.

To read the rest of the column, pick up the latest copy of The Valley News. You may also subscribe to the paper by calling 598-6397

Valley Viewpoints: Circle of Friends

by Dean Norton, President of the New York Farm Bureau

I am pleased to announce that New York Farm Bureau has recently named Senator Patty Ritchie to our annual “Circle of Friends” list.

This legislative award is granted based upon her record of legislative support for New York agriculture and the Farm Bureau. New York Farm Bureau is a non-partisan organization and does not endorse elected officials or political candidates.

Senator Ritchie joins a number of other legislators in the Senate and Assembly that have a superior voting record on issues and have shown strong support for New York farming during the 2012 state legislative session.

Each member of the Farm Bureau “Circle of Friends” has demonstrated an understanding of the important issues impacting farmers and the considerable impact the industry has on our economy and quality of life.

New York Farm Bureau, the state’s largest general farm advocacy organization, works closely with the state legislature to strengthen and enhance the agricultural industry in New York State.

This year’s legislative session proved to be a challenging one for farmers, but with significant support from key legislators, such as Senator Ritchie, agriculture will continue to be one of New York’s most important industries.

We are pleased to provide the “Circle of Friends” designation to Senator Patty Ritchie to thank her for her hard work on behalf of farmers in her District and across New York State.

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Legislators discuss clerk memo behind closed doors

by Carol Thompson

A memo issued by acting Oswego County Clerk Georgiana Mansfield was the subject of a closed-door session during Wednesday’s meeting of the legislature’s Community and Consumer Affairs Committee.

The memo, issued Sept. 20 states, “Any contact with representatives of the public, media or legislators concerning the functioning of the Oswego County Clerk’s office or any topic concerning this office not related to the filing, recording or searching of documents will be handled solely by the acting county clerk or the deputy clerk.”

Legislators held a lengthy executive session and adjourned the meeting as soon as reconvened. Legislator Terry Wilbur, who serves as committee chairman, said after the meeting that he could not comment on the executive session.

Legislator Jake Mulcahey attempted to discuss the memo in the public session and the executive session was called for the reason of “proposed litigation or arbitration” as well as Article 14 of the Taylor Law.

County Attorney Richard Mitchell added the session was for pending or proposed litigation and/or arbitration and the employment history of a particular person or persons or matters leading to the appointment, employment, promotion, demotion, discipline, suspension, dismissal or removal of a particular person or persons.

While legislators are being tip-lipped following the executive session, they were vocal prior to the meeting.

 To read the rest of the story, pick up the latest copy of The Valley News. You may also subscribe to the paper by calling 598-6397

In And Around Hannibal: September 29, 2012

by Rita Hooper 

This week, an era came to an end in Hannibal. After 53 years, Dr. Arena has closed his office door for the last time.

Doc Arena moved to Hannibal in November of 1959 and has faithfully maintained his medical practice to those of us in the Hannibal area. When he first came to town he did everything, even delivering babies!

Though born in Brooklyn, he and his family moved to Fulton when he was a young lad of five. After graduating high school in Fulton, and a year stint in the army, he went to NYU on his path to becoming a medical doctor.

In 1956, he graduated from the Rome Faculty of Medicine in Italy where he obtained his medical degree. He did his internship and residency at Rochester General Hosital in Rochester. He went back to NYU and did a post-graduate year of study at their College of Medicine. He’s moved his office three times while remaining in Hannibal. He was on the attending staff at Lee Memorial and the courtesy staff at Oswego Hospital. He has watched as medicine went from yellow pad to computer, the hospital to an urgent care center and to the hospital, staffed by hospitalists.

Aside from his dedication to his patients, he will probably be most remembered for the displeasure he would display to patients who did not do what he told them to do.

Willis Cook used to delight in telling me the story of walking into Doc’s office and putting the phone in the waste paper basket – when Doc looked at him qith questioning eyes, Willis simply said – “I thought I’d save you the trouble.”

I remember when I called him one night probably after 10, when my infant was running a high temp – he bellowed at me “how do you know he has a temp?” I was new to town but had heard of Doc by his reputation so I bellowed back, “cause I took it.”

I never told him I lied and hadn’t really taken his temp but a mother knows things like that. After that, we treated each other with mutual respect. I appreciated that he would take calls after hours and if you called his office, he’d often answer the phone himself. Doc was never hesitant to make referrals.

As a patient at the hospital, you knew he would see you at least once and usually twice a day. He kept his distance but many in this town thought of him as family. Curmudgen would be a good word to describe him… I bet every one if his patients has stories to tell.

On behalf of a grateful community Doc Arena, we wish you well in your next adventure! You will be missed!

*  *  *  *  *

Received a note this week from Town Supervisor Ron Greenleaf. If you are interested in serving on a new committee to seek and promote new businesses and to bring new families to town, Ron and members of the town board would like to hear from you.

He also mentioned that several folks had approached him regarding bringing natural gas to Hannibal. If this is of interest to you, please let Ron know so that they can determine the interest and where the people are that would like it, before they approach National Grid.

The Hannibal Fire Company’s will be hosting their breakfast buffet Sunday beginning at 8 a.m. at the fire house on Oswego Street. Menu includes pancakes, French toast, bacon, sausage, eggs, home fries, toast, sausage gravy and biscuit.

The Senior Meals Program will be meeting this Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at noon for lunch. The menu includes Italian sausage on a roll with onions and peppers, baked beans, corn, cookie on Monday; tuna salad sandwich, homemade cream soup, juice, cookie on Wednesday; and ham steak, scalloped potatoes, green beans and fruit on Friday. For reservations call Rosemary at 564-5471. They meet at the Senior Center, in the same building as the Library.

Rosemary is busy preparing for the Hawaiian Candlelight Dinner Oct. 10 from 5 – 7 p.m. to be held at the fire department with a great menu, entertainment, and door prizes. This year’s theme is a Hawaiian one. Give Rosemary a call now and reserve your spot.

The Hannibal Jammers will be meeting this Monday at 7 p.m. at the American Legion on Rochester Street.

Home and School will meet Tuesday, Oct. 2 at 6:30 p.m. at the Kenney Middle School.

TOPS will meet at Our Lady of the Rosary Wednesday at 5:45 p.m.

The Hannibal Methodist Church hosts a free chili and soup lunch Thursdays at 11:30 a.m. Good food and good people to talk with. Take-outs available.

In other news, the Hannibal Historical Society celebrated the 33rd anniversary of the approval of its Constitution Sept. 24. The Constitution has had only two revisions in 33 years and is once again in need of an update. Jack Pope has agreed to chair the Constitution Committee, and is looking for help. If you are interested in viewing a small piece of Hannibal History and helping us bring it up to date, call Jack at 564-3079.

Hannibal Sports Schedule

• Homecoming Friday: Varsity soccer vs. Cazenovia

• Homecoming Saturday: Varsity football game and chicken barbecue at 1 p.m.

Hannibal cross country teams took part in the 61st annual Baldwnsville Invitational recently. The boys varsity team earned another first-place finish. The girls varsity team finished in eighth place while Hannibal’s boys junior varsity team earned a second-place finish.

Hannibal cross country finishes first in Baldwinsville Invitational

Hannibal cross country teams took part in the 61st annual Baldwnsville Invitational recently. The boys varsity team earned another first-place finish. The girls varsity team finished in eighth place while Hannibal’s boys junior varsity team earned a second-place finish.

by Rob Tetro

Hannibal cross country coach Dan Pawlewicz has his teams off to another tremendous start. Last Saturday, all of his teams took part in the 61st annual Baldwnsville Invitational.

The boys varsity team earned another first-place finish. The girls varsity team finished in eighth place while Hannibal’s boys junior varsity team earned a second-place finish.

Pawlewicz’s junior varsity team was led by Jordan Skipworth, who had a time of 18:29.

The girls varsity team was led by McKenzie Mattison, who finished with a time of 20:29, which was the 23rd best time overall.

The boys varsity team was led by Ryan Perry, who finished with a time of 16:11, which was the 6th best time overall.

Today, the teams are looking to build upon their recent success as they take part in the 48th annual McQuaid Invitational.