All posts by Nicole Reitz

GRB Class of 1983 to hold 30th year reunion

G. Ray Bodley High School’s graduating class of 1983 is having its 30th year reunion celebration Friday, July 19 and Saturday, July 20.

The Reunion Committee is looking for lost classmates.

The reunion weekend kicks off at Tavern on the Lock located at 24 South First Street at 6 p.m. Friday and the highlight of the weekend will be held at Battle Island Clubhouse at 6 p.m. on Saturday.

Other activities planned include a golf tournament at Battle Island Saturday afternoon, bowling and more.

Those seeking more information may visit www.g-raybodley83.com.

The events are also open to any of friends and family of the Class of 83, regardless of what year they graduated.

Those seeking more information or tickets may call Beth Pappalardo at 240-5501.

Senior athletes honored by Fulton Athletic Boosters Club

by Rob Tetro

The Fulton Athletic Boosters Club honored several senior athletes during a banquet held at the Oasis at Thunder Island in Fulton Tuesday.

There were 12 total acknowledgements given. Seven of those acknowledgements were awards while the remaining five were scholarships.

A new award debuted this year in honor of the late Dave and Judy Trepasso.

Known as the Dave and Judy Trepasso Fan of the Year Award, this is award is given to a local supporter who expresses devotion to Fulton athletics just as The Trepasso’s did.

The inaugural recipient of this award was Bob Weston.

The Dale Tombs Baseball Award went to Cody Dick. Hannah Geitner and Pat Fink were named recipients of the Barney Naioti Leadership Award.

The Joe Castiglia Effort Award went to Mary West and Tim Conners. The Gene Adams Most Improved Athlete Award was given to Allyson Bricker and Mitch Lalik.

To read the rest of the article, pick up a copy of The Valley News. You can subscribe by calling 598-6397 or click on the link on our home page.
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Fulton’s Hope Fest 2013 continues tonight and tomorrow

Pictured are John and Mary Lou Palm in front of the sign at the Fulton War Memorial. Palm will speak for two nights at Hope Fest, which continues tonight and tomorrow night at the Fulton War Memorial. Doors will open at 5 p.m. The event will feature testimonies, Christian worship bands, and sermons.
Pictured are John and Mary Lou Palm in front of the sign at the Fulton War Memorial. Palm will speak for two nights at Hope Fest, which continues tonight and tomorrow night at the Fulton War Memorial. Doors will open at 5 p.m. The event will feature testimonies, Christian worship bands, and sermons.

by Nicole Reitz

A Christian outreach event called Hope Fest 2013 will continue tonight and tomorrow night at the Fulton War Memorial.

Doors open at 5 p.m., and the event begins at 7 p.m. The event is free and is presented by the Fulton Evangelism Committee.

Hope Fest will feature local christian bands, testimonies and preaching from organizer John Palm and his son, Joe Palm, a pastor in Orlando, Fla.

The other guest speaker is Julio Roque, a former drug addict and gang member who now pastors Lighthouse Christian Center in Baltimore, Md., the Palms’ home church.

Fifth Ward Councilor Jay Foster will give a brief testimony on the first night speaking about how Jesus changed his life.  Valley News Managing Editor Andrew Henderson will also speak at Hope Fest.

Palm and his wife Mary Lou were drawn to Oswego County after serving as American missionaries in Newcastle, Australia. Palm said that he was given a vision in the middle of the night of the word “Oswego,” which he then looked up on a map.

From there he began writing letters to the churches in the Oswego area and pastors from the Rive of Life Assembly of God in Fulton and Martville Assembly of God both responded.

The Palms then travelled to upstate New York because of the vision that God shared with them. Palm said he found it interesting that the Native American definition of Oswego is “outpouring.”

“As Christians we are always praying for an outpouring,” said Palm.

Over the past 14 months, Palm has stayed mainly in Oswego County, meeting and praying with different denominations.

To read the rest of the article, pick up a copy of The Valley News. You can subscribe by calling 598-6397 or click on the link on our home page.

West Broadway

JerryHoganKasperek_Wby Jerry Kasperek

By now, Dear Readers, you must have figured out that I’m not really a historian. I write mostly from memory and from what others tell me they remember.

Thus, I want you to know how happy and grateful I am for your input and for your corrections.

Now, before I move on to another subject, I still have a couple of items to address about West Broadway.

According to Elaine Rowlee Knight, it was Dick Candee and not Jim Candee, as I reported in a previous column, who ran a restaurant there many years ago.

Elaine’s mother was a Candee, so Dick was Elaine’s uncle, and she remembers the restaurant very well. It was long and narrow, with a showcase of pies in the front, a small space for the ice cream counter, and booths along both sides in the back.

The family slept in an apartment over the diner. Elaine remembers the high ceilings, as were usually found in tall brick buildings of yesterday. This particular one also had an intercom, which apparently came in very handy.

While Dick did all the cooking — always with a folded apron over his clothes, he was a great cook — Elaine said, his wife did all the baking.

And if it got busy, they called upstairs on an intercom for their children, Polly and Ann to help out. Jimmy was their younger brother.

And, if she happened to be visiting her cousins, Elaine pitched in, too. “I took water to the tables,” she laughed. “That was before child labor laws!”

Dick Candee had many interests. He trained dogs, English Setters and Pointers, and horses for Frank Ash, who used them in local field trials. Mr. Ash, as we in the older population  will recall, was the head man at the Sealright Corporation and lived right here in town.

When Bill Myers took over the restaurant and Dick Candee retired, he spent the rest of  his life on his farm. The old homestead, at the end of Chestnut Street, was on a prime piece of property near our lake, which eventually became the site of G. Ray Bodley High School.

To read the rest of the column, pick up a copy of The Valley News. You can subscribe by calling 598-6397 or click on the link on our home page.

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Hannibal names 2013 valedictorian and salutatorian

Taylor Beckwith (right) and Adrienne Shortslef, seniors at Hannibal High School, have been named as this year’s valedictorian and salutatorian. Both students received final grade point averages of above 100 percent.
Taylor Beckwith (right) and Adrienne Shortslef, seniors at Hannibal High School, have been named as this year’s valedictorian and salutatorian. Both students received final grade point averages of above 100 percent.

by Nicole Reitz

Taylor Beckwith and Adrienne Shortslef, seniors at Hannibal High School, have been named as this year’s valedictorian and salutatorian.

Beckwith, daughter of Scott and Kimberly Beckwith of Hannibal, will attend Hillsdale College in Michigan and major in chemistry. She was attracted to the school’s graduate programs and small campus.

She also received a $6,000 a year merit scholarship from the college.

Beckwith is going for Hillsdale’s pre-med program and hopes to become a surgeon. She discovered that she wanted to become a surgeon during the dissection unit in biology.

“Everyone in our group was afraid of doing it, but I had a ball and loved it,” said Beckwith.

She did not always want to be a surgeon. Beckwith said that she went through a phase where she wanted to be a marine biologist. She lost interest after realizing that the job requires diving, something she has a fear of.

Beckwith’s favorite subjects are chemistry, followed by calculus. “I like puzzle solving and with chemistry everything just clicks and fits together, whereas English is more interpretive,” she said. “I like things to be exact and calculated.”

For the past four years, Beckwith has been a part of the ski club. She has also participated in a writer’s open forum, OCAY League and National Honor Society.

As part of the National Honor Society, Beckwith was required to do a five-hour service project. She volunteered at Fairley Elementary School’s Celebration Day and helped out with the sports boosters, running the snack bar during games.

Beckwith is looking forward to more freedom in college and more input in the classes she takes. She also wants to take advantage of the nearly free piano lessons offered to Hillsdale students. Beckwith has been playing piano since elementary school.

She will miss her best friends Megan and Colleen, who will be attending school in Buffalo.

“I will miss being around here (Hannibal) and seeing the same faces passing in the hallway,” she said.

Beckwith’s most memorable teacher was Mrs. Dunn, her Spanish teacher who retired last year. “She was so enthusiastic, she’d always make comments in Spanish that some of the class wouldn’t understand,” she noted.

Beckwith credited her love of learning to her parents. “I think my dad has been my biggest influence education wise,” she noted. “He’s always told me to work hard and taught me to think for myself and how to figure things out on my own without being dependent on people.”

Shortslef, daughter of Lisa and Chas Shortslef of Sterling, will attend the Albany College of Pharmacy in the fall and work towards her doctor of pharmacy degree.

She chose Albany because of its small size and the opportunity to take mostly pharmacy courses without many general education courses.

To read the rest of the article, pick up a copy of The Valley News. You can subscribe by calling 598-6397 or click on the link on our home page. 

Food

RoyHodge_WEBby Roy Hodge

When I was looking through the list of columns that I have written since 1979, I discovered that a lot of them were about (guess what?) — food. Is it surprising that I have often written about food and eating?

I have written columns about Crackerjacks, sauerkraut making, soft drinks, and Toll House cookies:

“I have been thinking a lot about the famous Toll House Cookie this week. It all started Saturday when I found a little recipe booklet in an antique shop. The booklet, ‘Delicious Recipes Including Toll House Cookies,’ said the cookies were made with Nestle’s Semi-Sweet Chocolate, and features a photo of the yellow-wrapped bar with Peter Cailler Kohler Swiss Chocolate Co., Inc., Fulton, N.Y. clearly printed on the wrapper.”

I have also written about potato chips, Grandma Brown’s beans, ice cream, Girl Scout cookies, and several times about Peeps. There have been articles about French onion soup, breakfast cereals, Mrs. Pringle’s Christmas Cookies, and, of course, pizza:

“Can you believe that when I was a young child pizza wasn’t a staple in the average home. I can’t believe it either, but it’s true. It must have been the late forties or early fifties when pizza showed up in my life. It was sometime around then that my father discovered “Frank’s Pizza Shop” and pizza became a once a week menu item at our house.

“I don’t know why, but pizza was the only food that my father would even think about eating if it came smeared with an abundance of tomato sauce. And, he really seemed to like pizza.”

There have been columns about my mother’s and grandmother’s cooking, about fruitcakes, the New Orleans Cooking School, chili contests, and about my favorite neighborhood restaurant Enrico’s:

“I have probably had over 300 meals at Enrico’s Restaurant over the years. Enrico’s is located in the neighborhood where I grew up in Syracuse. When I went to grade school at McKinley, I passed Enrico’s four times every day.

“When I was fifteen I went to Enrico’s with my friends; my wife and I dated there; we celebrated birthdays and anniversaries there; we took our kids and friends there through the years.

To read the rest of the column, pick up a copy of The Valley News. You can subscribe by calling 598-6397 or click on the link on our home page.

Moe Harrington selected as lead in ‘Mame’

Director Inez Manor Parker has cast Moe Harrington as the lead in the Oswego Players’ 75th anniversary season musical, “Mame.”  

Although Harrington is making her debut with the Players, she is no stranger to local theatre, being well-known particularly in the Syracuse area.

Harrington said she is thrilled to be under the direction of Parker with whom she shared a stage in the Oswego Summer Theatre production of “Anything Goes,” playing the part of Reno Sweeney.

She is the associate development director for the Q Center, a safe place for LGBTQ youth; a state licensed massage therapist for 18 years; and a board member at the Redhouse Theatre in Syracuse.

She has toured the east coast extensively, with favorite credits including “The Graduate,” “Funny Girl,” “Pete ‘n Keeley,” “The Unsinkable Molly Brown,” “Romance/Romance” and her SAMMY nominated one-woman show, “One Moe Time,” with music director, Jeff Unaitis.

Harrington has appeared in the original cast of Jeff Kramer’s “Lowdown Lies” and “Reaching for Marsby.”

Skilled also as a director, Harrington’s credits include “Torch Song Trilogy,” and “Blue Plate Special,” starring Oswego Players producer and actress, Tammy Wilkinson.

In addition, she has appeared in over 20 titles for Full Cast Audio and is the voice of Rosethorn in the “Circle of Magic” book series, written by New York Times Bestselling author, Tamora Pierce.

The show is scheduled for production July 5, 6, 7, 12 and 13 at 8 p.m.; July 14 matinee at 2 p.m.

Ticket information may be obtained by visiting Oswego Players’ website at www.oswegoplayers.org.

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Fairgrieve school holds Health and Science Fair

Devyne Ferebee not only researched the habitat of the peacock, he created his own paper mache model of the bird for visitors to the Fairgrieve Health and Science Fair to see.
Devyne Ferebee not only researched the habitat of the peacock, he created his own paper mache model of the bird for visitors to the Fairgrieve Health and Science Fair to see.

The recent Health and Science Fair at Fairgrieve Elementary School was packed with student-made projects and health-related activities and information.

Parents and community members turned out to see what budding scientists and researchers at the school have been working on and visit with some of the local community health and wellness organizations in the gymnasium.

Submissions for the science fair covered a plethora of topics and areas of interests.

Participation in the science fair requires students to research and/or develop and test a hypothesis; write a report on their findings; and create an eye-catching display that explains their topic, experiment and/or results.

The Health and Science Fair is coordinated annually by Fairgrieve teacher Sharon LaChut as a way to encourage the students to explore areas of interest, learn new things, and also learn about commitment and follow through.

Each student who completed a project was presented with a certificate of participation along with a scholarly ribbon to recognize their creativity, effort and dedication to learning.