All posts by Andrew Henderson

Richard LaDue, owned Sunshine Produce

OBITS-LaDueRichRichard “Rich” LaDue, 61, of Fulton, died Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at home surrounded by his family and friends.

He was a 1970 graduate of G. Ray Bodley High School where he was a member of the varsity gymnastics team. He owned and operated Sunshine Produce on West Broadway in Fulton since 1975.

He was an avid hunter and snowmobiler. He was predeceased by his parents, Julian and Rose West LaDue.

Surviving are his son, Richard (Kelly) LaDue of Ontario; significant other, Wendy LeVea of Fulton; step-children, Jeremy and Jessica Shepard and John LeVea; grandchildren, Devin and Brandon LaDue, Carly and Macy Chirdo, Chloe Hurlbut and Calie and Cadie Shepard; siblings, Darlene Noel of Fulton, Robert (Debi) LaDue of Vineland, N.J., James (Cathy Sosenko) LaDue, Julie (Scott Seguin) LaDue, and William (Cindy) LaDue, all of Fulton; and many nieces and nephews.

Calling hours are from 4 to 8 p.m. Friday, May 31 at Foster Funeral Home, 910 Fay Street, Fulton. Services will be held 10 a.m. Saturday, June 1 at the funeral home with burial at Mt. Adnah Cemetery in Fulton.

Fulton police to hold annual bike rodeo Saturday

The Fulton Police Department’s annual bike rodeo will be held June 1 from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. at the Fulton Community Center.

This free event is focused on youth bicycle education and safety and there will be other information and attractions including air hop rides and food and drinks.

The event will be held rain or shine. Weather permitting it will be in the Fulton Community Center/War Memorial Parking Lot located on West Broadway.

In the event of bad weather, it will be held inside the Community Center’s ice rink area. Children can complete an obstacle course with the assistance of a Fulton Police Bicycle Officer. Children can bring their own bike or use one provided by the Department.

For those who bring their bikes, they can register them with the Fulton Police and have a safety inspection done by Doyle’s Bike shop. Bicycle safety educational material will be given out to all children.

There will be a bicycle raffle sponsored by Dunkin Donuts and Menter Ambulance. Representatives from Oswego Health will be present to fit and give away helmets which have been purchased with a grant from the New York Governor’s Traffic Safety Committee.

Other organizations scheduled to be present are the Oswego County Sheriff’s Department, who will be making child identification cards; Menter Ambulance will have an ambulance present for children to tour; and the Fulton Fire Department will have a fire truck present to tour also.

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Top two students in Phoenix

Top Firebirds – Zach Manzer and Kyle Fisk, seniors at John C Birdlebough High School, have been named valedictorian and salutatorian for the Class of 2013. –Valley News photo by Nicole Reitz
Top Firebirds – Zach Manzer and Kyle Fisk, seniors at John C Birdlebough High School, have been named valedictorian and salutatorian for the Class of 2013.
–Valley News photo by Nicole Reitz

by Nicole Reitz

Zach Manzer and Kyle Fisk, seniors at John C Birdlebough High School, have been named valedictorian and salutatorian for the Class of 2013.

Manzer, son of Alan and Janice Manzer, has a weighted grade point average of 103.8. He has taken many advanced placement courses in his high school career, including AP American History, European History, Chemistry, Biology and Physics.

He is also a member of the National Honor Society, and a member of the track and field and cross country teams.

Manzer will attend the University at Buffalo for chemical engineering. He received the Provost scholarship from the college and wants to continue track and field at a collegiate level. The University at Buffalo is a Division 1 school and track and field at this level would be a time commitment.

“I love doing track, exercising and staying in shape,” said Manzer, who joked about keeping the freshman 15 at bay.

Manzer chose the University at Buffalo because he wanted to attend an accredited engineering school without having to go out of state.

To read the rest of the story, pick up a copy of The Valley News

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Fulton Public Library offer summer reading programs

Library fun – The Fulton Public Library is offering a variety of summer programs for children and families, beginning with Every Child Ready To Read, a program designed for prekindergarten children and families. Pictured is Kim Raabe as “Mamapajamas” as she leads children and their families in a fun, music activity at a recent program.
Library fun – The Fulton Public Library is offering a variety of summer programs for children and families, beginning with Every Child Ready To Read, a program designed for prekindergarten children and families. Pictured is Kim Raabe as “Mamapajamas” as she leads children and their families in a fun, music activity at a recent program.

The Fulton Public Library is introducing “Every Child Ready To Read,” a program designed for prekindergarten children and families.

“We’re excited to add Every Child Ready To Read,” Director Betty Maute said. “The program works with children from birth to age 5 in a free, exciting workshop series that will help prepare children with the skills they will need to learn to read before they start school.”

The program will be offered June 11, 18 and 25, and July 2, 9 and 16. Children ages 3-5 years workshops are at 10 a.m. and sessions for children under 3 years are at 3:30 p.m.

The morning session will be conducted by Cathy King, author of several books on craft projects that can be used by libraries during children’s story hour. Sallyann Danforth, president of the Friends of the Fulton Public Library, will lead the afternoon session.

“Workshops will include a fun story time, and make-and-take games for children and grown ups so parents can continue to work with their children at home,” said Maute. “This program is made possible by a grant from the Oswego County Youth Bureau.”

Registration for the library’s summer reading program, “Dig Into Reading,” begins June 28. The summer reading program offers awards and incentives to participants for keeping up with reading through the summer.

To kick-off the program June 28, the Milton J. Rubenstein Museum of Science and Technology will present “Dig Into Dirt.” Aug. 2, at the conclusion of the summer reading program, the MOST returns with “Water Filtration,” a hands-on workshop that is limited to 25 children.

The library will also be offering a one-week summer writing camp for children ages 8-13, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., July 29 through Aug. 2. It’s entitled: “What Do Your Words Say About You” and the instructors are Jim Farfaglia and Karen Burke.

“This series is for you if you: love to write and want to get better; want to learn to edit your work and prepare it for an audience; and are ready to share your work but aren’t sure how,” Maute said. “Seating is limited to 12. All those interested should call 592-5159 to register. Your name will be added to a lottery to be drawn July 12 when participants will be selected randomly.”

Among the library’s regular programs are Story Hour, every Wednesday at 10 a.m. with a craft or activity, Maute said.

“We also have eight personal computers available to the public with internet access,” she noted. “All you need is a library card or to stop by the front desk to find out about other options. We also offer free Wi-Fi for your laptop, smart phone, or tablet device.”

Meetings of the library’s board of trustees are at noon on the third Tuesday of each month. They are open to the public. Friends of the Fulton Public Library meet the third Thursday of each month at 6 p.m. and anyone who is interested is encouraged to attend, Maute said.

Checkerboard Feed Store

by Jerry Kasperek

Let’s begin with The Checkerboard Feed Store: it was painted red and white, as Roy Abbott reminded me per a recent phone call, not black and white as I had written in my last column.

And it was on Gansvoort Street, behind the building that today houses the Gift Shop on West First Street. Roy also reminisced that he had worked at the GLF on West Broadway in 1961 and 1962 before it became Agway.

About Agway, Dave Coant wrote me a letter saying: “In the late 60’s until 1972, the Agway Feed Store was managed by a man from Painted Post, NY, Howard Duane Potter. He also ran a small beef cow farm in Volney on the Howard Road across from where the Niagara Mohawk building is now. Part of that farm, that is now gone, is behind the fence that was put up around the old dump at the corner of Howard Road and Silk Road.”

Mr. Potter went back to Painted Post, ran another Agway, and farmed “the best sweet corn and red potatoes in the southern tier,” Dave wrote, recalling his youth. He said he became best friends with Howard Potter Jr. and he “spent many summers planting corn and digging potatoes and selling the vegetables from West High School parking lot.”

Howard senior passed away in 2010, Dave said.

To read the rest of the column, pick up a copy of The Valley News

Legislators to discuss computer pornography behind closed doors

by Carol Thompson

Oswego County Legislature Chairman Kevin Gardner said Wednesday that the matter of pornography found in a county highway department employee’s computer will be discussed during a closed-door executive session some time in the near future.

There has been no updates on the issue since the April 11 meeting when County Administrator Phil Church stated that one employee had been disciplined and two other computers were being checked.

he allegation that a highway employee spent time at work viewing pornographic pictures and videos was brought to the attention of Legislator Doug Malone by several highway employees, who claimed their complaints to management went unaddressed.

Malone went to District Attorney Gregory Oakes and requested the allegations be looked into. That resulted in a finding of pornography in the employee’s computer.

To read the rest of the story, pick up a copy of The Valley News

In and Around Hannibal: New Jersey Mission

by Rita Hooper

I write you today from Hamilton Square, N.J., a short 45 minute drive to Ortley Beach. Ortley Beach is one of the town’s most severely damaged by Hurricane Sandy — not far at all from the famous roller coaster that was seen by millions resting in the ocean. I am here with members of Cayuga-Syracuse Presbytery and four members of a Presbytery (think district) from South Korean.

Some of my readers will remember that three years ago the Women’s Choir from Korea was here visiting and three of the ladies stayed with me in Hannibal. We had a ball despite the fact that they didn’t speak English and I don’t speak Korean. I took them to the Osteo class in Hannibal, Ontario Orchards and the Jammers among other stops.

This year the delegations wanted to do a joint mission project together, which led us to Ortley Beach. Time has sort of stood still since the hurricane. Many of the homes have been demolished and their foundations and crawl spaces have been reclaimed by sand and debris. Many stand or lean waiting for demolition and others are in varying stages of rehabilitation.

But these houses were once homes as evidenced by an odd shoe here and a puzzle piece there, a clothesline partially buried in the sand, a NY Yankees kick ball in need of air, a Giants towel serving as a curtain in the living room window and an American flag hanging across a front door. The curbs are littered with piles of siding and wood scraps — trash is picked up several times a week. There are signs of hope.

The streets are a buzz with activity as the homes are being worked on — you can see evidence that many groups have sent people to volunteer and help. Trucks carrying building materials and construction workers are easily spotted. The house next door to the house we were working on, was surrounded by scaffolding as new windows and siding were being put in.

To read the rest of the column, pick up a copy of The Valley News

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Fulton Area Snow Travelers Snowmobile Club supports CYO

Sporting goods – Members of the Fulton Area Snow Travelers club present Coordinator George Timmins with a donation of sporting goods for the CYO program. From left are Mike Schmidt, Bill Monette, Timmins, Tracey Doyle, and Ken Wheelock.
Sporting goods – Members of the Fulton Area Snow Travelers club present Coordinator George Timmins with a donation of sporting goods for the CYO program. From left are Mike Schmidt, Bill Monette, Timmins, Tracey Doyle, and Ken Wheelock.

The CYO program at Catholic Charities of Oswego County recently received a generous donation of sporting goods supplies courtesy of the Fulton Area Snow Travelers Snowmobile Club.

Catholic Charities was one of several organizations that benefited from the Great Eastern Whiteout, the club’s annual vintage snowmobile show and race held at the Fulton War Memorial. Established in 2000 in Sandy Creek, the event relocated to Fulton in 2010 and draws more than 400 snowmobiles each year.

Strong supporters of the CYO program, Fulton Area Snow Travelers Snowmobile Club have made regular donations to the CYO program including game stations and video games, sports equipment and more.

“Each year, proceeds from our Great Eastern Whiteout are used to benefit the youth of our community,” said Tracy Doyle, Snow Travelers member and owner of Doyle’s Bike Shop. “As a boy, I remember how much I enjoyed going to the CYO program at Catholic Charities. I know that today the kids still love going to CYO after school to be with their friends and they enjoy participating in the many games and activities that CYO offers for both boys and girls.

CYO Coordinator George Timmins said, “We are very appreciative of the donation we received from the Snow Travelers. Their donation included flag football equipment, which the kids have been asking for and are excited that we will add that to our list of activities.”

Open to youth in grades 2-12, Catholic Charities’ CYO program is available Monday through Friday from 2:30 to 6:30 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Activities include basketball, foosball, dodge ball, ping-pong, billiards, computer games, and more.

There are also a number of computers available for youth including several that have computer access to assist them in doing their homework. All activities are free of charge and are supervised by trained staff.

The staff encourages youth involvement in both structured and non-structured activities, and assists all participants as needed to insure that they receive the full benefits of the program as well as help in their physical and mental development.