Hodgepodge: Congratulations, Camden Hodge!

A Little Hodgepodge

As a testimony to how swiftly time escapes us, the following was part of this column on October 18, 1992:

There’s a new little Hodgepodge in our lives these days. Courtney is a proud big sister. The new little brother arrived almost on schedule last month in Roanoke, Va.

His name is Camden Stephen Hodge, our first grandson. Camden weighed in at 9 pounds, 11 ounces.

A hefty, healthy kid, he was able to play two quarters with the local football team the next day. (Just kidding, it was really only a couple of plays.)

I talked to Courtney Sunday and asked her if Camden could come to the phone. She said, “No, Papa, he’s swinging . . . but don’t worry, you won’t have to push him . . . it’s not my big swing outside . . . he’s got his own swing in the house.”

Courtney also informed me that she can still hold her new brother on her lap but he’s getting “pretty big” and wiggles a lot. Big sister also confided that “he’s cute.”

By the way, Courtney attended the first day of kindergarten a few days before Camden was born. According to her father, she’s still a student, not the teacher.  I’m surprised.

And this the next year:

An Ambidextrous Eater

I can’t say that I wasn’t given a fair warning.

“You shouldn’t sit next to Camden,” Courtney told me shortly after my arrival at her house last week.

“Why?” I asked.

“You’ll see,” she answered.

I did.

Camden is an ambidextrous eater and doesn’t always practice perfect aim with either hand. One-year-old ambidextrous eaters, who don’t have any attachment to forks or spoons, soon learn that their little hands are looked upon by everyone within touching distance as dangerous weapons.

It’s a game. Get those little fingers well lubricated and touch everything that moves. Camden is good at this eating thing. He does a lot of it.

For latecomers, I should tell you that Camden is Courtney’s little brother. He’s 14 months old, wakes his mommy up at 6 a.m. most days, ready for breakfast and, growing boy that he is, doesn’t stop eating until he goes to bed, about three changes of clothes later.

He is an expert on execution of the high five, and keeps busy each day by constantly redecorating the family room with an unending supply of toys.

“Little Brother” a College Graduate?

Yes, there is a reason for this background information on Camden. As some of you read this we are in Virginia where we are attending this weekend the festivities surrounding the graduation of Courtney’s “little brother” from college.

Camden will be among the recipients of diplomas at Radford University’s graduation ceremony.  Camden will join his parents, Craig and Penny, as proud Radford alumni.

Congratulations, Camden.

Radford University is located in a very scenic area of southwest Virginia, alongside the beautiful New River in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Looking at a list of “notable alumni,” I haven’t yet come across Penny or Craig’s names, but I have discovered that Dave Mattingly, whose voice I hear regularly on daytime radio, is listed as a Radford graduate and a National Public Radio producer and newscaster.

Also among Radford alumni are actors Barry Ratcliffe, Regan Burns and Jayma Mays; Frank Beamer, head football coach at Virginia Tech; and ESPN Nascar analyst Marty Smith.

The “Mountain Goats” Were Here

It was time again last weekend for the “Mountain Goat Run” to take over our neighborhood for a couple of hours. The “Run” usually isn’t one of my favorite area events.

In the past, I have been annoyed on “Mountain Goat” day – because I was an hour late getting home from church; because I had to deal with a policeman who had apparently listened to one more than enough complaints; because it is difficult to adjust to change — especially on what is usually a lazy Sunday morning/early afternoon; and because … well, just because.

The organizers of the event seem to have an equal opportunity attitude as far as the mountain goaters are concerned.  They seem to be giving every resident of the area a chance to be tormented by the runners by altering the course at least a little bit every year

Instead of having the runners turn left at a certain intersection they are directed to turn right; they have them proceeding three blocks instead of two, and a new set of residents have their cars blocked in their garages each year.

Oh well, no mountain goats until next year.

Mother’s Day Snow

With a picture sent to The Valley News, my friend, Mary West, helped remind Fultonians and others of the snowfall that the city received on Mother’s Day, May 12, 1996.

According to weather observers, that was the latest date Fulton ever received snow. I didn’t know the exact date but I am familiar with the occasion.

When I call John Florek regarding a late-season snow accumulation, I am often told, ‘Don’t be so sure that this is the last snow of the year.  We have received snow on Mother’s Day before.”  Now, thanks to Mary, we have proof of that.

To mothers and others, enjoy a pleasant, and a snowless, Mother’s Day.

One More Thing:

You can believe this if you want to — or not:

A university lecturer asked her students to describe in a page or less the difference between ignorance and apathy.

The top mark went to a student who wrote: “I don’t know and I don’t care.”

… Roy Hodge 

 

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